27

Update: In Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite and later, it seems the zoom button has been replaced by the fullscreen button. The green widget no longer contains a plus sign, but two outward-pointing arrows, and places the window in fullscreen mode. To zoom a window, you now option-click this button. The green button isn't for maximizing. If you want to maximize, use ...


23

The window expands to fit the content, and don't add additional whitespace like windows OS does. Now let’s look at Apple’s website in Safari. Notice the first image below is a very small window with both vertical and horizontal scrollbars. The second image shows what the window looks like after clicking the Zoom button. Again, it takes up all of the ...


17

It's because Apple explicitly mentions in its Human Interface Guidelines that all software providers should provide all functions available with a single click and they don't see any use case for providing a right click. That said, it does support an option to have a secondary click as shown below which brings up the contextual menu Now coming to the ...


15

Two thoughts that come immediately to mind is to include a slider that is always at 100%, and allow the user to adjust the size of different segments. Allow the user to add, or remove, segments as needed. Another option might be to do the same with your graph. A slider plus a pie chart is visually busy, so why not combine the two? Be careful of adding ...


12

Apple removed scrollbars from appearing, unless in use, from viewports in 2011 with the release of Lion, immediately sparking multiple articles about how to get them back. The usability rationale and merit of this can still be debated today. Not showing it until it is needed is a clean design and does not clutter the display, but the user must figure out ...


10

In the original MacOS versions (pre-10), there was a close button in the top left and maximize (if available) in the top right, as shown here: Putting them together seems like a reasonable choice to tidy up the interface. So, perhaps the real question is why was the close button in the top left corner originally? My best guess: Mac users use Command-Q (or ...


8

it's a status bar. it's not specific to osx, all browsers have one. it used to show the url of hovered links, status of requests, etc and then some add-ons/plugins started using it to show information. Recently it's been reduced to a something like a tooltip in most browsers (it only appears on mouse over links or when something is loading, etc).


8

Steve Jobs was fairly inspired by Xerox's Xerox Star, which was the first to introduce a User Interface in their system. Demo video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYvxgNhUwBk Xerox's Xerox Star was poorly marketed, and hence wasn't well known. With the inspiration of the Xerox Star, Apple launched Mac OS 1.0 and placed the Window Commands/Actions to the ...


7

Document vs App This has to do with the distinction between: Document windows App windows Close means close. The only question is whether you are closing a document in a multi-document application, or a singular app window and thus the application itself. (For more: Human Interface Guidelines for MacOs). Document window With some applications it makes ...


6

The mice that come with Macs today have effectively more than one button, a press on one side is considered the primary button and the other side the secondary button. The primary button is associated with selecting and dragging and activating (with double click), the secondary button usually pops up a context dependent menu. Earlier Macs had only one ...


6

This is a status bar. In Cocoa programming you can create this by adding a custom view on the bottom of a window and using a text field to show information as required. Note that in OS X programming, the "Status Bar" (class NSStatusBar) refers to the the rightmost portion of the system-wide menu bar, with all the little icons, the clock, spotlight and so ...


6

First, I think a better name for what you are asking about is mouse pointer, not mouse cursor. For me cursor evokes the mouse-unrelated text input positioner (as in the Terminal or text editor cursor that you move around with the cursor keys). Why isn't the pointer choice on clickable areas a Pointing Hand Finger which suggests an area to click on? ...


5

In addition to the cut and paste option mentioned above, you can also right-click to cut and paste. As you can see from the screencap there are both cut and past options. Cut will dim the text of an icon until it is pasted elsewhere, at which time it moves the item to the new location. Dim text indicates the item has been cut.


5

Maintaining 100% will be impossible without adjusting other sectors any time the user changes something. That is likely to be confusing. Perhaps you could use visual feedback to show the unallocated amount or overflow. Instead of a pie chart, show a progress bar with a segment for each amount. If the total is less than 100% show the unallocated amount at ...


4

Apple has created the OS X Human Interface Guidelines, which describes the user interface, and other aspects, ought to behave on OS X. Moreso than Microsoft or other companies, Apple strongly encourages developers to follow these guidelines and I believe that OS X users have an underlying assumption, whether they realize it or not, that an app they use will ...


4

Without looking through the internet for help it is a steep learning curve for some new users. A massive part of Apple's product is having the support to complement it, in this case the Genius Bar, and also telephone support. I first got a macbook around 6 years ago, and I also struggled to work out how to rename a folder. I achieved this learning by ...


4

Some small issues about the current UI: The destination is before the source. The first dropdown has "---" pre-filled, but not the other one. The "Setup Enterprise Automatically" checkbox is not clear. You explain it right below but as a user, I would expect the whole setup to be done automatically. I would use such a phrase on a button, not a checkbox. The ...


4

Yes, it’s a mess and there’s no easy way out. The international standard ISO/IEC 9995-7 specifies several symbols for keyboard labels. Most of them have been added to Unicode and exist in at least one supplied font on most modern operating systems, by the way. They are known to a varying, mostly limited degree. Power users, who are the primary target group ...


4

Is there a reason they're on the left? Yes. It's that the ultimate button in this little micro "dialog" box (Window title bar) is the destructive action of closing the window, and Apple determined the ideal order of actions to be from left to right: | Destructive || Neutral || Constructive | Since the button on the far left closes the window, and is ...


3

Just so it's explicit, the full list of default point sizes for type in OS X is as follows: 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 18, 24, 36, 48, 64, 72, 96, 144, 288 There are two competing historical reasons why this set was probably chosen. Before System 7 (released in 1997), all fonts on the Mac were bitmap fonts, rather than TrueType outline fonts (chiefly because ...


3

The device reports its Capacity in base-2, whereas 32 GB is the capacity in base-10. You can see 32 GB as an easy to remember number which represents your particular iOS device model. Apple recently changed OS X to report disk sizes and file sizes in base-10. I don't know why Apple didn't change reporting of iOS devices capacity to base-10 as well. I ...


3

Apple design guidelines state: Discoverability. Encourage your users to discover functionality by providing cues about how to use user interface elements. If an element is clickable, for example, it must appear that way, or a user may never try clicking it. The idea is that clickable elements should be recognised as such without hover. This is even more ...


3

Microsoft and Apple have slightly different UI guidelines, which I think you should adhere to. It may be important to note that the latest OS X Human Interface Guide hints a near-future shift towards touch supportive desktop interfaces. Which, if complied with, could mean a radical application redesign. The same is also already true for windows 8 ...


3

for a first-time user, who never worked with any computer, its really confusing I don't think that's Apple's target demographic. For that matter, I don't think that, in 2014, that's any OS manufacturers target demographic. So, if accommodating that demographic results in a cluttered UI for others, it's understandable why they may omit it. As for Apple, ...


3

Companies such as Apple and Facebook can somewhat get away with being trendsetters and dictating behaviour to their users. This is because they have such market penetration and users will spend more time using them than others. ie, if you propose a different 'Like' button behaviour on your low-traffic website than Facebook or Google+ do, then you are likely ...


3

I'd add a tiny cross next to the title the user entered, that shows up on hover (i'm assuming this is not a mobile app, if it is, then show always). You're essentially "deleting" the text you entered.


3

Checkbox is not an appropriate control here. Its purpose is to denote a selected item. I think you have 2 options here. Both need to be tested with users. Replace the checkbox with a button labeled Default and leave the title field editable at all times. Make the button switch between Edit and Default when the title is set to the default or has been edited,...


3

Windows In this situation, you should keep the menu text the same; add or remove a checkmark as appropriate. The “Menus” section of the Windows design guidelines says, Don't change menu item names dynamically. Doing so is confusing and unexpected. For example, don't change a Portrait mode option to Landscape mode upon selection. For modes, use bullets ...


3

Should a Mac app ask the user permission for gathering data about their hardware? Could be reworded as: Should an app ask the user permission before gathering data? To instill trust with the user, yes, absolutely.


3

They are very small, which is very frustrating, and so the likelihood of accidentally clicking on one of them is also relatively low. This is both a negative, and a positive. Hence the question you ask (what benefits outweigh the negatives). Minimizing and maximizing are not the most common functions. Usually you open or close tabs, change between tabs, or ...


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