17

Ideally, they sit in their own office by themselves, so they aren't distracted and aren't quick to distract other developers. Studies show that millions of dollars are lost every year JUST by developer distractions. Essentially, it sounds like you're asking where they should be strategically located, so as to make it quicker to find assistance and interact ...


6

It is an extremely interesting question, and the problem has several dimensions. Understanding the refinement Tis is the main problem I see here. The "Results Radius" does not convey any meaning that would be exact. Is it accuracy refinement? Or maybe it is narrowing the results to the ones that are close to my location? Or something completely else? So, ...


5

As a front end developer / engineer myself, I find it to be more valuable to work with designers. After all, I do turn design into interaction (which is a form of design). After the design is implemented correctly, I leave data dependent snippets easily able to be "plugged into" by a data specific developer. So, in short. I "sit" on the design team, but ...


5

I'm worried by this point in your question, which I feel may be at the core of why you are asking this at all: I'm working to expand our capability by adding front end devs so we can have better relationships with the developers via the front end dev, or translator. ... Serve as translator between dev and UX That's not what a front-end ...


4

I think you can have both worlds in the scenario you described. First, add the "choose location" as optional input box when searching. Insert it near the search field so that it will be seen, but don't require the user to fill it. Then, if location wasn't entered and user searched - he may receive too much irrelevant results. Then you can have a helper text ...


4

@Dom has explained it very well and I do agree with him. However, if you are looking for a solution with the same approach in mockup, I would suggest you change the position of the slider to top-left of search field - so the users can first set the criteria and then perform search action: Think of a way to explain the use of slider as to what that ...


4

Provided the user is able to zoom in / out, and move this map to be able to see what they want, I would suggest that you put the video feed on top of the map in the top corner. If you look at google maps you will see that they also overlay controls on their maps to avoid blank spaces (e.g.the satellite image in the bottom left).


3

Suggestion: I'm not sure what fields of the address you are collecting. I would see if you can limit the entry to Zip Code or City. That's a low point of friction that pinpoints the location of the user, while providing them the immediate value. For example: Enter your city / zip code to find technicians in your area. [City] or [Zip Code Field] Simple, ...


2

I think that this approach would provide the most control: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

The best solution from a user perspective is probably having a single search field, as we can see on Booking.com. At the same time, it's also the most complicated to develop. When designing this type of search field, the main issues you usually need to face are: duplicates (e.g. there are up to 28 "London" in the world, approximately 18 of them in the US)...


2

Option 1 Specify On-line Service as a location. It's more understandable, compared to No Location. Then Location header is more appropriate, compared to Area. Pro: users can explicitly choose, if they want only services with physical locations Option 2 Add on-line services to filtered by Area results if it's appropriate. Make smart guess, if the physical ...


2

There obviously is a standard listing, as evidenced by the coding (illustrated on the map in Wikipedia): What you could do, to illustrate the order, if you don't want to provide a map, is list the codes: UKC North East UKD North West UKE Yorkshire & Humber UKF East Midlands ... UKL Wales UKM Scotland UKN Northern Ireland This should absolve you of any ...


2

That's a big assumption you are making in there. I would say that it's the very opposite because of all the smart devices. User can be anywhere and by filling the form with false data sounds really confusing and dangerous. Keep it simple, don't try to be too smart. :)


2

Create a section "About" in your app menu, with the description of you/your company (bio, contact details, etc) and the credits for resources used. EDIT: Someone made the same question in 2013, take a look at the answers: Where to Put Credits for an App


2

Never - People are mobile and so are devices theirfore the application would pick up on the current location based upon the wifi/location sensor in the device. Also, VPN's (which I use all the time) can potentially places the user outside of the location they care to receive packages.


2

Organize by work type A front end developer should sit with Development. In my opinion, that isn't a topic to debate. It serves a couple of purposes: They are located with and inspired by their peers. Developers. They gain more credibility by being part of the team and not "one of those creative types". They write software. All facets of the software will ...


2

As I commented, this is a really impossible question to answer conclusively. It all depends on your company and the project and any other number of variables. That said, I've been in this position many times, and the system that seemed to work best (for me, and the projects I was on, in the companies I was in) was for the UI devs to be on the SCRUM team. ...


2

From my personal experience as a Frontend Developer I find it more convenient sitting with the UI/UX team. Because I am implementing their designs in to actual prototypes and it's easier to polish the UI because I have them right there to consult and critique as the implementation progresses even after completion. So I would summarize to say "Very often as a ...


2

Thinking on my own experiences in traveling to places with different alphabets, it was nice to have both the local alphabet and the Latin alphabet on maps and signs, so that I could both match the glyphs to street signs and pronounce the name when talking to people around me. Sometimes (as I learned in Tokyo) even having a map doesn't prevent you from ...


2

I think you gave the answer in the question: Why not mark the part of the road with color, thick line, dotted line etc. or a combination of those. Connect the label/info to it with a line or arrow. +———-———+ | Label | +———-———+ / A—-——[=====]——————B


1

In the old company, we have sit closer to Back-end Developers. So basically receiving the designs from an external agency, then after the implementation, working with back-end to help them implement their code, and do some modification if needed. In the new company, back-end does build api's, and I deliver a complete solution top to bottom. I do not need ...


1

Not a final solution, but as idea to think: you can suggest location and give the ability to easily use it if it right with some kind of button. In this case you also gives the information about address format.


1

No, this shouldn't be default. You could offer it as an option but I wouldn't give the user too much choices because of reasons already mentioned (false data). And not ever user is happy when websites try to get their location automatically because of privacy concerns - although they can turn location off, of course. I would only offer this option if the ...


1

I'd say this is overkill, but if you really want to be smart, maybe you could get the user's current location behind the scenes, and when he/she starts filling in the form, auto-suggest the current location if it seems to correspond.


1

You don't state in your question what exposure your app has, or how defined the location needs to be. However, the best option for less literate users would be to ask them to enter their zip/post code (into a free text field). If your app is across national boundaries, then have the app ask them to select their country first (preferably by a drop-down list ...


1

I'd include Scot/NI/Wales in your north-south (major axis), east-west (minor axis) classification. It's essentially scanning the UK from top to bottom a row at a time, Scotland's at the top like it would be in a map, London/South-East at the bottom. Scotland Northern Ireland North West North East Yorkshire & Humber Wales West Midlands East Midlands ...


1

The simple solution to your problem is to explain why you want to turn on their location sharing setting and how it can benefit them. The way you actually design the interaction can be however you choose, but the core tenant is explaining the reason and benefits for turning their location on. When your app is turned on, you are able to ask permission to ...


1

The solution which is very simle and works fine in any case, is: Eiffel Tower (see on map) 5 Avenue Anatole France 75007 Paris France Provide: An address A link to the map An map fragment as an image If they really need and know how to cope with lat/lon, you can add these, too (for most users these mean nothing)


1

If '100 Main Street' is part of their brand, then it should probably be part of the visual design of the branding on the site. (Part of the logo). If you want people who are new to the restaurant (i.e. the entire rest of the world other than long-standing locals of the town) then you want to make it easy for those people to find it. So, in your Contact Us ...


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