189

Option 2 is the best option, because you'll recognize your own language regardless of your knowledge of other languages (be sure to also provide character sets if you support for example Japanese) Problems with options 1 and 3 Option 1. If you don't speak / understand the current language you may not recognize your own language. In the example Germans ...


114

Option 2 is the way to go as you should always show languages listed by the way they are written in that language. It is the way both Wikipedia and most companies that deal in many languages do it. Here is how Apple handle it: Problems with the other options Option 1 is a headache to maintain as you need to have the name of every language in every other ...


61

I would imagine the typical user will only ever use one language version. The only time they will ever see another is if it installs in a different language and they have to change it. As such you should stick to the conventions for each language. It doesn't matter if it is inconsistent with others- afterall, if you were doing the Chinese version then it ...


40

If you're dealing with geographical distances, just use miles. We never think of towns being X feet or yards away from each other. Our street signs (and mapping apps, etc.) show decimals, so that's a good way to handle fractional miles. Even under a mile we're used to seeing distances like 0.2 miles. (One decimal place is usually enough.) Even when things ...


34

I don't know about iOS as Apple does not seem to have international design guidelines, but I can tell you that for example Microsoft has extensive UI guidelines regarding capitalization in different languages (including Dutch) that indeed differ from English.


28

Option 2 is the best, since user can always recognize its own language. There's is a small pitfall though. If you present language selector as dropdown, user won't see any values except current auto-detected language, unless he clicks it. And if user doesn't understand currently selected language - say, already mentioned Chinese, he might won't even notice ...


26

You need to consider an icon's usage and meaning to determine if it should be mirrored. This Google Material Design article gives a detailed description of icon mirroring. The main difference between left-to-right (LTR) and right-to-left (RTL) interfaces is how the passage of time is articulated. Languages that use LTR scripts depict time as passing from ...


20

If the browser interface is RTL, everything would be mirrored compared to an LTR interface: As for the second part of your question, I wouldn't phrase it in terms of "good" or "bad" UX. It goes like this: Usability and cognition Part of usability is efficiency, which by many definitions involves (amongst others) the mental effort users ...


20

When it comes to multicultural design Geert Hofstede's studies on cultural dimensions is a must read. Germans score high on uncertainty avoidance, which could lead to them to read everything and to be absolutely sure about everything before they start. From The Hofstede Centre: Germany is among the uncertainty avoidant countries (65); the score is on ...


18

Yes, it matters (especially in parts of the world where week numbers are important). There are three main calendar formats defining the starting day of the week; Monday (used by most of Europe and the rest of the world that adheres to ISO-8601), Saturday (used by much of the Middle East), and Sunday (used in North America and Israel): Image from Wikipedia ...


16

The trivial, most general answer is that sorting by last name makes sense when users are matching based on last names and sorting by first name makes sense when users are matching based on first names. Of course, this gets you absolutely nowhere because the hard part is figuring out which is likely to be the case! It's not possible to do this ...


15

I am not aware of any heuristics or best practices since there are different use cases depending upon the countries you are designing for. However this excellent article Global by Design : Creating a world-ready web design gives some valuable inputs: Look at the scope of designing a global template (except in unique cases) : A availability of a global ...


15

It's going to be really hard to respond to this question unless we can see a screenshot of what your interface or site currently looks like. However here are some reasons as to why you are not getting a 100% right to left F shaped pattern for your site: Your interface might not be totally right justified as explained by this article : Our usability ...


15

The thing is that in many languages (including Dutch and German), there is no such thing as title case. It simply does not exist, and theirfore "it looks weird" is actually already a nice way of putting it - it is simply wrong. As also highlighted by @the other one, it does not matter to the typical user how it is done in a localization that he does not use.


13

Microsoft has their terminology online and for download: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/language This should contain all default things you need.


11

What you're looking for is called a 'Locale' (a more technical term) or 'Region settings' (better to understand for users). As some countries and regions share the same format it might be a better approach to ask the user what looks familiar to them: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If you need to stick to the UI you'...


10

I agree, your title is boarder line facetious but I couldn't help and chuckle, perhaps it's true? Think of the opening scene of the movie the fifth element where the professor asks the alien "are you German?" - this by the way was dubbed as "are you an alien?" In the German translation of the movie. The original version is funny in its own right. I am a ...


10

It's called RTL (or "right-to-left") support (or layout or UI, based on what you're talking about).


9

No. Oranges: 50 is not correct in French. In french, you have to write Oranges : 50, with a non-breaking space before the colon “:”. In traditional print, including in English, we put this non-breaking space. It is nicer.


9

Mnemonics don't translate well and retaining their mnemonic nature. However, that isn't a critical issue. For example, the common ctrl(or command) + X, C, V, A, W, Q are the standard shortcut in many languages even when they have no associated mnemonic. Even in English many common shortcuts have no mnemonic link. Consistency is significantly more ...


9

I have noticed a soft crossover from mi to feet on street signs around 1000ft (0.19) I say its a soft crossover, because you will see things like 0.1mi, but its much more unusual to see distances longer than 1000ft rendered in feet. I've seen very few signs use yards, although I can't say if that's universal.


9

RTL (right-to-left) indicates a different text direction, but not a mirror image of the same content in LTR (left-to-right). Mirroring the Latin letter R roughly gets you the Cyrillic letter Я, which is the (horizontal) mirror image visually speaking, but does not by any means indicate a change in text direction. Similarly, images cannot be simply mirrored ...


8

My vote goes for option #2. If you're looking to change the language because you don't understand whatever the default is, it will be a lot more effective to see the choices in a language you do understand. That's kinda the point, right? I also ran across this article from 456 Berea Street where the author prefers a combination of your options 1 and 2, (...


8

The only valid option is #2, as it's the only one that ensures a visitor is going to recognise a language name. In the other two scenarios you're assuming the visitor is going to understand a second language, and that's a big assumption.


8

One thing to remember is that languages can be common across countries but they might be spoken differently. For example, Spanish in Spain will be a little different from the Spanish spoken in Mexico. A recommended way to handle this would be to go with the approach Microsoft has which allows the user to select the language based upon the country and the ...


8

Option 2 is definitely the best way to go. No flags, please! I'm a native Czech speaker. I work in English and understand basically several different languages. I was doing localization from English to Czech (including typefaces) since 1993. This means I'm a total geek, however since I was a kid, I'm trying to focus on my (read: user) experience. Borrow ...


8

In this case, I would argue that there's no benefit to knowing the names the Russian players have chosen for themselves. The characters are in a different realm, so you can't contact them outside of the battle. Even if you did create a good machine transliteration, half of the character names are probably going to be genital references anyway. All you really ...


8

That's an interesting question. But I think any definitive answer will just be ignoring context and some of the dimensions involved. Here's a breakdown: Market survey You'll find Hebrew and Arabic calendars that use either paradigm. Can't tell at which ratio, but a quick online search (especially if you search for the english translation) will reveal both....


7

Automatic translation should not be considered as an option. Too much will go wrong. It is possible to automate part of the translation work, of course; translation agencies do it all the time. The crucial question is: how much does it cost to maintain the site in two (or more) languages? If the Spanish version is not maintained synchronously with the ...


7

Aside from technical difficulties mentioned in @mookamafoob's answer, there potentially is this to consider: Many users in countries that have non-ascii characters in their alphabets have learned that URL's can not be made up of anything but ascii characters. Using identifiers, even if technically possible, might cause users to wonder, if an address they ...


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