Hot answers tagged

106

Here's another alternative: You mentioned you don't find the progress bar the most appealing, and it's taking up precious real estate. Would you consider a more compact preloader and success message that do not impact layout? Just as an example: I don't know if that particular example would fit your situation. But if you can achieve a more compact design,...


106

You might want to look into skeleton ui patterns or placehold patterns. They're very popular right now and are used by for example Facebook. I found a nice short article on medium that talks about it, but I'm sure you can find a lot on it around the web. To quote the writer: It seems like a good alternative to the loading state since it re-enforces the ...


103

Sudden rearrangement of content is disturbing Dynamically updating data while user is looking at it may (depending on type of data) be disturbing to the user workflow - for example, if you're reading a sentence and it changes while you're doing it, it's unwanted. The same applies for any content changes that will re-flow or reorder other content. Appending ...


72

Showing details in a form not only developers understand is fine. If you are able to write your installation details in a more funny way than just "Checking Operating System Version" this might have two advantages: The user gets feedback about what's going on and that there's something going on at all. When installing e.g. a computer game you normally have ...


71

You should not artificially delay how long a user must wait. Do not punish a rapid response by slowing them down to an "average". Let all queries complete naturally, for longer query times you may want to consider the following... Jakob Nielson did some research on wait times back in 1993. From "Response Times: The 3 Important Limits" - (...


51

The latter for sure. The users will experience a poor user experience with the former. What's interesting about this question is that it raises the notion of 'visibility of system state' or "as long as I know what's going on, I feel I am in control" and that's just what your loading bar will do. I suppose a more important question is where this status bar ...


41

I would suggest going with a bar loading screen which basically informs the user that content is loading and you are preparing them for an unique experience. You can also try to engage the user by informing them about the game and the experience offered For example Empire total war informs the user about what he can experience in the game This game Nyrthos ...


34

It can be useful for several reasons. One is that the user gets a feeling of that something is actually happening and not just a progress bar increasing. If the UI says "Checking OS Version" or "Initiating virtual processor" she gets a feeling that something good happens, even if she doesn't know the technicalities behind it. Second, if the process would ...


34

As an analogy, consider the mirrors universally installed in elevators. While these mirrors give the user a false sense of added space in the lift, they also serve as just mirrors; people tend to look at themselves and do not seem to notice how long the lift is taking to take them wherever they are going. But if they put in a countdown telling people 'xx ...


34

Really you shouldn't put this application on your home page. The home page serves as the entry page to your site, and users will need quick access to navigation. I would consider even ~1s load time too long for that. If you still want to present the application on your front page, I would hide it behind a button where the user can consciously start loading ...


28

It's called a content placeholder or skeleton screens. This is a great way to focus attention on progress and content being loaded instead of wait times while the whole app is loading. About Skeleton screens Apple have incorporated skeleton screens into its iOS Human Interface Guidelines, calling it "launch images." It recommends showing an outline of the ...


20

Call Of Duty: Advanced Warfare has a practice shooting range as a loading screen, which enhances the user experience by allowing users to practice without consequences. Depending on your game you add a mini-game which enhances regular gameplay. Because your game is so small, it should load within a few seconds up to maybe 20 seconds on a slow connection so a ...


17

Additionally, it's less data intensive, and if you're designing with a mobile first philosophy, that's got to be a consideration. You're going to need to consider that the screen size is constrained to smaller dimensions than a desktop machine, which means that even smaller changes are more likely to move what the user is looking at off screen. Many (...


17

Your best bet is to render the page formalities and structure in a second or two (ethernet time, cell-data time will vary). And then, backfill the data as the data comes up. Imagine if you reboot the starship Enterprise. There are dozens of displays. They don't all come up at the same time, they flit on, one at a time, depending on how long they take to ...


16

As a page loads on Pinterest and Facebook they both show solid blocks where regular content will show up. Handling a page load this way provides better feedback than just a loading message/animation. In the case of Pinterest, they calculate the dominant image color and set that as the block loading color. Facebook simply shows a blue block and thick solid ...


15

This is the most compact and intuitive way to present an indefinite progress. The key word is indefinite. source I can hardly imagine an indefinite linear solution. For example, a common progress bar in indeterminate mode looks a bit unclear: source BTW, circle is a very useful shape (just want to make your day better :) Round-robin - The term ...


14

Jakob Nielson describes the 3 time limits which he calls the 'Response-Time Limits': There are 3 main time limits (which are determined by human perceptual abilities) to keep in mind when optimizing web and application performance It is an article written in 1993, but three years ago he published a new research report on website response times stating that:...


14

showing what the program is doing while working on a progress bar gives an additional indication of progress. There is also a nice way of doing this involving a details screen: This method doesn't just show the progress of the installation as a whole, it also shows what the current step is, what the previous steps is and sometimes even the progress of the ...


14

This link/information should help you: Facebook content placeholder deconstruction - http://cloudcannon.com/deconstructions/2014/11/15/facebook-content-placeholder-deconstruction.html To summarize the link information: Why would I ever use this? We can’t always remove having to wait for information but we can make the wait feel shorter. By giving some ...


13

The simplest way would be to let the user know that new content is available. These can be found in many different applications that dynamically load new content. For example say, the user has scrolled down a couple of times in an application with infinite scroll you can do something like this, For paginated applications, consider not updating content in ...


12

Progress indicators are generally implemented to reduce the user's perception of system latency. It's this need to eliminate the perception of system latency that gives progress indicators value. Conversely, if there isn't any lag at all between a user action (clicking 'Upload' in your example) and the system response (uploading of the file), displaying a ...


12

Users expect the interface to load as fast as possible. There is no need for research about user expectations during the loading process because it is logical that they will expect it to load as fast as possible. If the app/website doesn't load in 10 seconds they will leave. As Andrew Martin pointed the faster the app/website loads the higher the ...


11

Ideally, we'd always be able to give the user an estimate of the amount of time remaining. Visually, this is usually done through the infamous progress bar. However, certain activities such as waiting for a stream to buffer are difficult to estimate completion for. Most, if not all, progress bars have some sort of "indefinite" state available to programmers ...


11

Over 30 years ago I was what at the time we called a systems programmer, looking after a minicomputer network with a few dozen users. In those days, the displays were essentially 80x25 "text only". When we upgraded the comms links between the minicomputer and the displays, several users started complaining that the system was slower, even though we knew ...


10

I like the accepted answer and I agree that you should not artificially delay anything. However, given your expected wait times, I'd do what you can to improve perceived performance. For instance, showing a spinner while the results are loading helps. But according to this study, it's optimal to wait 0.4 seconds before showing the spinner. There's another ...


10

If loading time is more than 1 second. It is one of the classics, going back to 1968. 1.0 second is about the limit for the user's flow of thought to stay uninterrupted, even though the user will notice the delay. Normally, no special feedback is necessary during delays of more than 0.1 but less than 1.0 second, but the user does lose the feeling of ...


10

https://www.nngroup.com/articles/progress-indicators/ has in-depth research about it: In short: Dynamic “visibility of system status remains among the most important and universally applicable principles in user-interface design.” Summary: Wait animations, such as percent-done bars and spinners, inform users of the current working state and make the ...


9

Does the user need all the parts to be loaded to use the page effectively ? If so, then going with the approach of loading parts separately might not be a good experience as users might want to interact with these parts and find that they can only partially interact or not interact at all might ruin the user experience. However if you can interact with the ...


9

No, they don't care about the details. But the great thing about it is that they know exactly what is happening, it feels like he/she has control.


9

-Perceived- speed is more important than -Actual- speed. Your assumptions are correct and there is some pretty clear data in the article " The Truth About Download Time " showing how much more important perceived speed is than actual speed... When we looked at the actual download speeds of the sites we tested, we found that there was no correlation ...


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