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26

Personally speaking, lean UX is not a type of UX strategy, it is more like the business strategy which accommodates the fundamental UX principles. In UX Design you Design -> Prototype -> Validate as is, but when you do this in sync with other development units in the organization, it becomes lean UX. Anyways, here are some of the links/books/what-have-you. ...


15

To be a good User Experience Designer, you have to understand the customer, the user and the problem. The key is to solve the problem by the help of design. You have to understand the various aspects of User Experience design and find a niche and complement it with other skills. Broadly UX can be categorized into User Research - This is one of the key part ...


14

Although I am a staunch supporter of agile and lean methodologies in UX, it's important to remember that they are just methodologies. UX is not about how you create a great user experience, rather it is about what the user experience is. So there are many different UX methodologies that can achieve good results. Often one methodology is more suited to a ...


10

Per Nielsen Norman: Chrome is the visual design elements that give users information about or commands to operate on the screen's content (as opposed to being part of that content). These design elements are provided by the underlying system — whether it be an operating system, a website, or an application — and surround the user's data. What ...


9

I think there needs to be more clarification on this concept in general. Even reading some of the comments so far I’m getting confused when UX within Agile is equated with Lean UX. There's a gap there that isn't really addressed in most content on the subject. And I imagine that's just because it's a challenge in general for which I'm not sure there's a ...


9

Both In accessibility scenarios is better to have a button. For example, someone using a head wand will prefer just a button, because selecting content is very difficult. But this is not just for extreme cases. For example, if I'm using a mouse and just use it for navigation, having a "copy" button will be more comfortable than not having it. As a matter ...


5

This all depends on what your definition of UX is... which has been a changing beast over the years - from what the experiences is through to a job description for certain kinds of role. I would personally say that you do need the qualifiers - since you can apply UX practices in many different contexts. For example: A dedicated UX agency brought in to do a ...


5

This is well discussed in a brilliant book: Marissa Mayer and the fight to save Yahoo! by Nicholas Carlson. Google won over Yahoo in Search because Yahoo's majority of income came from their Advertising, which made their homepage cluttered with several ads which might not even be relevant. Marissa Mayer was the Product Manager for Google Search and the ...


5

With all my projects the main reason is laws. In EU, you're required by law to get the users' informed and active consent before storing or accessing any kind of personal data. The ePrivacy directive – more specifically Article 5(3) – requires prior informed consent for storage ofor access to information stored on a user's terminal equipment. http://ec....


5

Well there is the Lean UX Manifesto from Anthony Viviano, Ajay Revels and Ha Phan: Early customer validation over releasing products with unknown end-user value Collaborative design over designing on an island Solving user problems over designing the next “cool” feature Measuring KPIs over undefined success metrics Applying appropriate tools ...


4

The button alone should define the call to action (specifying what the button will do / where it will take you). It should not depend on external text to explain what the action is. You can however have additional text around it to give the user reasons why they specifically might want to do that action.


4

Custom is a type of plan, right? Then it should be another plan select button, like so: The Custom Plan link takes you to a plan customization page. Alternately, you could do a tab-style jQuery slidedown, whereby clicking Custom Plan reveals the customization interface, like so:


4

I agree with @jonw's comment above, that ideally you would re-design your content from scratch. If for whatever reason management won't wait that long (still do try to persuade them to redo sometime your content for mobile please!), then I have found the most honest approach and the one which will not break UX fundamentally the following: Break the site ...


4

I would say that it depends on what you are showing on the loading animation : if you just want to show that something is loading without any duration information, a clockwise will tell the user he just have to wait. but if you actually display an information about how long the loading will last (much better) you can use 1 round of counter-clockwise like ...


4

I'm always very allergic to articles about these kind of topics saying "this way of working is the new hype and it totally works for enterprise businesses". My problem with Lean UX is that is says that you can focus more on the User Experience by spending less time on wireframes and prototyping and letting your user use the product sooner, but the user ...


4

Lean UX is driven by principles, not prescriptions As Lean UX has gained popularity, it's not surprising that it's been translated into a set of prescriptions like "don't create hi-fi wireframes", or "design must be cross-functional". In fact, Lean is not about these rigid prescriptions at all. Lean UX is driven by a core set of informed ...


4

Considering usability, it is better practice to have all controls in your page always visible. Otherwise controls look missing or confuse the user looking for follow-up actions which are not in display. However, changing states (like temporarily disabling submit buttons) can help to prevent false form input. I have added 2 examples. Easy to scan forms ...


4

I don't think there is a workflow that is guaranteed to work, because it will depend on the product, people and process (and to an extent the tools) used as to what would be the optimal workflow when it comes to efficiency. So I would suggest you try to weigh up the product (i.e. what is being delivered), people (what are they comfortable with in terms of ...


4

If you're looking for an almost free tool, I need to tell you that Google Sheets is the best option. Here's how I set it up. It's called a "Rolling list of Observations" Columns U1, U2 etc are representing individual users.You start with the U1, note the observation(let's call it O1) in the observation column, and mark "1" for this particular user(U1). ...


4

This looks like a perfect candidate for plus (+) and minus (-) icon because of the accordion nature of the ui. See smashing magazine article on this design pattern. The choice of icon doesn't matter too much as long as it's not too confusing. I think the checkbox is not the right use here because a checkbox usually denotes a boolean choice within the ...


4

We were faced with this exact same problem. Our multi-select control behaves like yours, except for one detail: when the user clicks into the field, the menu immediately displays the full list of available options. We explored a number of design options, but agreed early on that we needed a straight-forward, easy-to-discover affordance to trigger the "...


3

For the "Lean" part of this: dividing the design documentation into: Style Guide - Always up to date Individual Designs - Not kept up to date after they have served their purpose. Wiki or Confluence is great for documentation since you can link from the designs to the Style Guide (and also in the case of using Confluence and Jira, link development tickets ...


3

Seems like the main difference/difficulty is the extra steps required to see how people interact with it in context up on the wall. Hope you have a budget to design and print giant prototypes! :) I don't think "best practices" change as much as internal workflow. You still need to observe users in context & note what works vs what doesn't, but if the ...


3

TLDR: We ask this question "What's the smallest increment of work that can be tested? We go and test that using the quickest solution that'll get us answers. Which means products like Axure and even Invision are often considered as too time consuming to use unless we're dealing with a heavy animation/interaction-based solution that is difficult to ...


3

The reason why is that by law (and its fuzzy) people have to have enough to show that they can't accidentally accept terms, usually when payment or providing personal information is involved. So if I sign up for a newsletter on Kickstarter, no big deal. But if I agree to pay $50 for a Garfield poster...a bit more consent is needed. The reason it's fuzzy is ...


3

It comes down to two related things: Ownership of action Trust The first of these is about the owner of the site wanting you to stop and notice the thing you're agreeing to, rather than just blindly agreeing. They know full well that the user probably hasn't read the terms, and is probably agreeing blindly to the T&Cs... but by forcing the user to ...


3

What about a hierarchical or tree organization instead along the left side? In your case, the top level elements would be "Admin", "Tests" and "Reporting".


3

I think it's partially inherent to working 'lean'. You design the product flow tension-based & when you catch these missed flows, you fix it ad hoc / improve it. I think, over time, your accumulated experience will guide you towards a more complete handoff, with all flows, error states, etc. included. Maybe a solution would be to start working on a ...


3

Can't we consider, if user has made no selection then he/she is intending all of them from dropdown? Many sites filters works in a same way. Users are already trained for using filters. Using the schemes that already exist we reduce cognitive load. If still want to make user think, How to show "Select all" option Try to keep 'select-all' option ...


2

online Wiki with the spec Look into using a 'component library'. They take time to set up initially, but can streamline projects down the road. The idea is to document individual elements. For instance, you may have a design pattern for a search field. You'd describe this pattern in the component library, add some visuals, and, ideally, maybe even have some ...


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