14

This link/information should help you: Facebook content placeholder deconstruction - http://cloudcannon.com/deconstructions/2014/11/15/facebook-content-placeholder-deconstruction.html To summarize the link information: Why would I ever use this? We can’t always remove having to wait for information but we can make the wait feel shorter. By giving some ...


10

You should use the same approach in every one of the 3 cases. Using multiple approaches just confuses the user, so choose one feedback for image loading, not multiple feedbacks for different events. I would use the blur effect combined with lazy loading (read more here: https://www.sitepoint.com/five-techniques-lazy-load-images-website-performance/). While ...


8

Use the blurry photo technique, and consider using a progress bar in certain circumstances because blurry images are indeterminite progress indicators. Spinners are useful for actions that complete quickly to give an indication that something is happening. When actions are going to take more than a second, you should provide an indication of progress. ...


5

Due to its perception of fast load speed and ability to give users content to focus on while waiting, use the 'blurry loading' technique on pages with multiple large images. Much has been written about the need to load page content quickly, with some studies showing that even an extra half second delay can lead to a 20% increase in page abandonment. The ...


3

We usually use a div. Make certain that the text is not confused with real text - but at the same time don't use lorem ipsum. (That will annoy or confuse your visitors.) Try something along the line as: This page is taking a longer time to load than expected. (Something interesting and relevant goes here.)


2

For an ecommerce application I would say that infinite scrolling is not the way to go. Infinite scrolling tends to be better for social media/discovery type websites as it allows for more user engagement and tends to be better for mobile as the user simply scrolls and never has to click. However, these positives come with a price. Mainly, poor page ...


2

As discussed above if your content is arriving at one time for a particular card, and it's not on field level - it's better you have only one busy indicator for a card because all fields inside the card will become ready at the same time.


2

How frustrating would it be to manipulate something that is still changing? I think the answer is "very." There is something called "moment of interactivity" and it can be progressive on a page. If the navigation is ready, show that, if another element is ready, show that too. But if a component is not complete, don't show it until it is. Otherwise, you are ...


2

Since this only occurs once at startup and users are accustomed to programs loading, Option 1 makes more sense. Could you have this information load with the program and extend the splash screen loading time so that the program loads with the information ready? To answer your title question, the user should not be allowed to manipulate a list before it is ...


2

In general, infinite scroll works well for something like Twitter/Instagram where users consuming an endlessly flowing stream of data without looking for anything in particular. Source: https://uxplanet.org/ux-infinite-scrolling-vs-pagination-1030d29376f1 Infinite scroll in search results is iffy because users are looking for specific results. You can ...


2

Not actually an UX question... Your devs are half-wrong, since sorting & pagination might be actually performed by DB. When using LINQ, for example the following expression: var persons = (from p in container.Persons where p.Age >= 18 && p.Sex == Sex.Female orderby p.Distance ascending select p) ...


1

Unfortunate set of constraints, but if you have these constraints, you should most accurately represent the user's comments in relationship to the comments it will live "next to" in chronological order. Don't misrepresent the comment placement. Keeping page size=10 in mind, if you have 100 comments and this is comment 101, the view should change from 1-10 ...


1

i don't know what data fields you are visually presenting, so my answer might not be helpful but have you considered adding a filter. Sorting is great for what's already loaded but a filter can provide some rules on the loading.


1

Am I right that what you ask is: What is the least unpleasant experience for my users that I can achieve with those technical constraints? It sounds like that without a refactor on the server you can not guarantee a good UX. Consider it. Is it possible to load and sort the whole list on the server in an acceptable time and keep it there in cache? If ...


1

Users do not like to wait, it breaks their flow of thought and creates frustration. If the wait is unexpected, the frustrution is much bigger. Sorting in most site is very fast and the unexpeted delay will cause anxiety to users. Another thing users hate is uncertainty, they want to know what is happening and how long it will take. Using a progress bar, ...


1

This question has 2 dimensions: one of them totally off topic (the implementation side) and the other being the UX side. Luckily, even the implementation side has been covered by Wojciech's answer. As for the UX part: technically, it can be done. But the question is: why would you want to do this? See, the idea of searching is to display results based on ...


1

I wouldn't bother showing anything until they have performed some sort of search. it may be possible to grab just the dealer names or some other useful bit of information from the database without taking the whole lot. This would allow an 'autocomplete' type function but wouldn't have the weight (and wait) of the full database download. Then you only need to ...


1

I definitely do not recommend B. As Ville Niemi states, you should always only show the useful bits. Besides, Facebook's only showing the placeholders when it's loading content (which should take about 1-2 seconds). Browsing What I, as a web developer/designer, do is show a fixed number of entries first, 5 to 10, and use a button to trigger the lazy-...


1

Neither the random nor fake preview seems useful. Content that is not useful should not be developed. It is waste of resources for both developer and user. Development time spent on low value work is not available for high value work. Effort users spend parsing and comprehending low value content is not available for actual work. Instead you should go back ...


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