61

I would imagine the typical user will only ever use one language version. The only time they will ever see another is if it installs in a different language and they have to change it. As such you should stick to the conventions for each language. It doesn't matter if it is inconsistent with others- afterall, if you were doing the Chinese version then it ...


56

It's a common pattern to use both, with following points in mind: Design for the lowest common denominator Assume that in the mix of language use and comprehension, many users will get confused with just the two letter codes Avoid making the user think unnecessarily In that case, that would mean including as much information as is reasonable. It doesn't take ...


55

It depends on the purpose of the dialog. A customer filling out his shipping information, for instance, would reasonably expect countries to be listed using the same language as the rest of the website. A customer on an English website would just be confused if he had to select "日本" to ship to Japan. But when the dialogue is to change the country/language, ...


54

Obviously, the first thing you have to ask is the language that the user speaks, because without that information, you can't ask them meaningful questions. However, a user is coming to the site with the intent to learn a language. If you show them a list of languages, of course they're going to choose the one they want to learn. The fact that the site has ...


49

If there's only one option, what benefit does the user get by having this menu there? It will just add confusion: why can I not select a different language? It's better to just add it once you have more than one language.


48

This is psychology Humans are the World's Best Pattern-Recognition Machines. Quite simply, humans are amazing pattern-recognition machines. They have the ability to recognize many different types of patterns - and then transform these "recursive probabilistic fractals" into concrete, actionable steps. If you've ever watched a toddler learn words ...


43

In short yes - unless you are dealing with a technical audience. Instead, refer to what is required in this case. If it's name, say 'Your name is required'. One useful bit of advice that all UX people should stick to is 'decode your language'. That means remove technical jargon and get rid of code names for projects and abbreviations. Many UX people coming ...


42

You can actually pull a language preference from the user's browser. Using this as a default may streamline the process and remove one of your entry barriers. Details here: JavaScript for detecting browser language preference The flexibility you offer is fantastic but it's likely the user has already taken care of this on a more global level. By no means ...


36

It depends directly on the language and if the diacritic produces a new letter or simply a variation of the same letter. In French (or Italian, Catalan, Portuguese...), accented characters (such as À, É, Ê, Ô, Ö, etc.) doesn't produce a new letter, they are only variation of the same letter. As such, one would expect words starting with an accented ...


34

I don't know about iOS as Apple does not seem to have international design guidelines, but I can tell you that for example Microsoft has extensive UI guidelines regarding capitalization in different languages (including Dutch) that indeed differ from English.


29

What a great question. As a general rule, it's good to flip positioning of iconography for RTL languages. So your bottom option, with the chevron on the left, is correct. If you're curious, I'm basing this answer on lessons learned running as lead designer on multiple projects with the NYC DOE and NYC mayor's office, where all projects have to support 11 ...


23

Assuming you handle the changing between language versions (as in the example of your first bullet point - sending a page) in a reasonable manner, then yes, you should consider having the language in your URL, but for a reason you've not mentioned here. Note: This generally gets referred to as 'language/region' because, more often, the two letter codes are ...


20

Firstly, I agree with what Luciano has mentioned. If the users don't have any choice, why make it seem like there is one? It's like advertising great offers that aren't in stock. However, if what you want to do is communicate that the feature is in progress then... Firstly I would ask you, how soon can you realistically deliver the other languages? If you ...


19

Semantic alternatives to whitelist/blacklist: greenlist/redlist (ablist; will also be obsolete with traffic lights in 50-100 years) passlist/faillist ("ill" is hard to read) grantlist/blocklist (four consonents per vowel, a bit chewy) goodlist/badlist (almost too trite) oks/noks (I like this one) letlist/banlist (i like banlist, but can't find a short ...


19

Thought I might login some fruits as well :) Having clear and descriptive labels is always recommended. So to answer your question directly: Yes you should ask as an input field with a more generic label invites ambiguity. Placing a clear label (in this case questions) above each control helps establish clear relationship between what you are asking for and ...


18

The general principle here is, as Mervin stated, feature discovery (or accidental discovery). In this specific case, it's an edge case that we really didn't design for explicitly. The more general case is for people that don't have enough rep to vote and allowing them to play around with the interface and discover the capabilities of the site and the ...


18

Because our brains are highly adept at recognizing patterns. To speed things up a bit, our brains gather a lot of data in one go, and attempt to descipher it in stages. The first stage is very quick - it takes the overall shape of a word (high emphasis on start and end letters) and matches it to a word it already knows. As such, 3 and E are alike, but "...


15

Safelist / Blocklist and Allowlist / Denylist have been adopted in the wild. I personally like Grantlist and Blocklist for semantic and syntactic reasons, though I understand some might be irrelevant to many. :) Both words can be used as verb and noun. This allows flexible usage in UI copy and casual discussions. “IP address 127.0.0.1 will now be granted.”...


15

The thing is that in many languages (including Dutch and German), there is no such thing as title case. It simply does not exist, and theirfore "it looks weird" is actually already a nice way of putting it - it is simply wrong. As also highlighted by @the other one, it does not matter to the typical user how it is done in a localization that he does not use.


15

Stick with is most common and time-proven. OK (with caps) has been used always. You can see its wikipedia page, is written using both caps.


14

There's two factors here; the first is brand image, the second is that autocorrect isn't perfect, and mistakenly swearing at people is a pretty city thing to do. First and foremost, brands want to project an image. That's probably why, aside from legal concerns, Youtube doesn't allow pornography. Legal issues aside, Youtube can't be taken seriously by a ...


14

I think you're on a bad footing if there's any confusion over the role the user is in when viewing a page. It's generally a good idea to use a non-overlapping language appropriate to the role, and set the tone and context so that the user simply cannot be confused. As a host, you might see phrases like your property/properties your home your listings ...


13

Microsoft has their terminology online and for download: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/language This should contain all default things you need.


12

No, don't do such a thing automatically. It goes against two very important principles of usability: don't surprise the user, and let the user feel in control. Typing in a different language is a problem users have to solve in many situations. Therefore, everybody who has to type in a second language has already chosen an application-independent solution ...


12

There are three concerns here. Relying on color alone is an accessibility violation as someone with monochromatic vision will struggle to figure out the level of color and understand if his password is weak or strong. To quote the WCAG site 1.4.1 Use of Color: Color is not used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, ...


11

What you're looking for is called a 'Locale' (a more technical term) or 'Region settings' (better to understand for users). As some countries and regions share the same format it might be a better approach to ask the user what looks familiar to them: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If you need to stick to the UI you'...


11

I actually live in Ireland so I can tell you first hand that UK English is OK for us for the topics of your website. There are some differences in everyday speech but not in technology jargon etc. Even these differences are nothing major and you'll find many UK newspapers in circulation or series on the TV. I think it would add more value to a website's UX ...


10

While I find a lot of this to be silly semantics, I've actually wondered in my 30 years as a Linux admin how it must feel to be a black person, and hear constantly that a good "hacker" is a white hat, while a bad "cracker" is a black hat. We've used black/white for so long and in so many ways that yes, it will be "uncomfortable"...


10

I can't find an article at present but standard convention for languages at least, is to show both the name of the language in itself and in English. For example if you go to a website in English and want to switch to French it will display Français (French). For countries... the same idea sounds good in theory until you consider countries like Belgium, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible