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181

Option 2 is the best option, because you'll recognize your own language regardless of your knowledge of other languages (be sure to also provide character sets if you support for example Japanese) Problems with options 1 and 3 Option 1. If you don't speak / understand the current language you may not recognize your own language. In the example Germans ...


113

Option 2 is the way to go as you should always show languages listed by the way they are written in that language. It is the way both Wikipedia and most companies that deal in many languages do it. Here is how Apple handle it: Problems with the other options Option 1 is a headache to maintain as you need to have the name of every language in every other ...


60

I would imagine the typical user will only ever use one language version. The only time they will ever see another is if it installs in a different language and they have to change it. As such you should stick to the conventions for each language. It doesn't matter if it is inconsistent with others- afterall, if you were doing the Chinese version then it ...


56

It's a common pattern to use both, with following points in mind: Design for the lowest common denominator Assume that in the mix of language use and comprehension, many users will get confused with just the two letter codes Avoid making the user think unnecessarily In that case, that would mean including as much information as is reasonable. It doesn't ...


55

It depends on the purpose of the dialog. A customer filling out his shipping information, for instance, would reasonably expect countries to be listed using the same language as the rest of the website. A customer on an English website would just be confused if he had to select "日本" to ship to Japan. But when the dialogue is to change the country/language, ...


54

Obviously, the first thing you have to ask is the language that the user speaks, because without that information, you can't ask them meaningful questions. However, a user is coming to the site with the intent to learn a language. If you show them a list of languages, of course they're going to choose the one they want to learn. The fact that the site has ...


49

If there's only one option, what benefit does the user get by having this menu there? It will just add confusion: why can I not select a different language? It's better to just add it once you have more than one language.


48

This is psychology Humans are the World's Best Pattern-Recognition Machines. Quite simply, humans are amazing pattern-recognition machines. They have the ability to recognize many different types of patterns - and then transform these "recursive probabilistic fractals" into concrete, actionable steps. If you've ever watched a toddler learn words and ...


42

In short yes - unless you are dealing with a technical audience. Instead, refer to what is required in this case. If it's name, say 'Your name is required'. One useful bit of advice that all UX people should stick to is 'decode your language'. That means remove technical jargon and get rid of code names for projects and abbreviations. Many UX people coming ...


42

You can actually pull a language preference from the user's browser. Using this as a default may streamline the process and remove one of your entry barriers. Details here: JavaScript for detecting browser language preference The flexibility you offer is fantastic but it's likely the user has already taken care of this on a more global level. By no means ...


36

It depends directly on the language and if the diacritic produces a new letter or simply a variation of the same letter. In French (or Italian, Catalan, Portuguese...), accented characters (such as À, É, Ê, Ô, Ö, etc.) doesn't produce a new letter, they are only variation of the same letter. As such, one would expect words starting with an accented ...


35

The short answer is no, don't use country flags. http://www.456bereastreet.com/archive/200604/indicating_language_choice_flags_text_both_neither/ The preferred method is to use the name of the language in the language itself (and watch out for diacriticals, language specific capitalization, etc). I'd say that using a flag only is a big no-no The ...


34

I don't know about iOS as Apple does not seem to have international design guidelines, but I can tell you that for example Microsoft has extensive UI guidelines regarding capitalization in different languages (including Dutch) that indeed differ from English.


29

What a great question. As a general rule, it's good to flip positioning of iconography for RTL languages. So your bottom option, with the chevron on the left, is correct. If you're curious, I'm basing this answer on lessons learned running as lead designer on multiple projects with the NYC DOE and NYC mayor's office, where all projects have to support 11 ...


27

Option 2 is the best, since user can always recognize its own language. There's is a small pitfall though. If you present language selector as dropdown, user won't see any values except current auto-detected language, unless he clicks it. And if user doesn't understand currently selected language - say, already mentioned Chinese, he might won't even notice ...


22

Assuming you handle the changing between language versions (as in the example of your first bullet point - sending a page) in a reasonable manner, then yes, you should consider having the language in your URL, but for a reason you've not mentioned here. Note: This generally gets referred to as 'language/region' because, more often, the two letter codes are ...


20

Firstly, I agree with what Luciano has mentioned. If the users don't have any choice, why make it seem like there is one? It's like advertising great offers that aren't in stock. However, if what you want to do is communicate that the feature is in progress then... Firstly I would ask you, how soon can you realistically deliver the other languages? If you ...


19

The problems with this approach are: You're choosing languages to demonstrate this that have an arguably stronger association with specific countries, so the solution seems better than it is. You are also assuming that everyone that speaks Spanish knows what the Spanish flag looks like, which is not necessarily true. Someone from Nicaragua doesn't have a ...


19

Do not insert hyphens, not even soft hyphens &shy; (which only appear if the browser forces a line break). This is because the user might hand-write it or read-dictate it to someone else with the hyphen. Which would be inaccurate and bad. You could however use the <wbr> element to indicate an optional word break opportunity. This will tell the ...


19

Thought I might login some fruits as well :) Having clear and descriptive labels is always recommended. So to answer your question directly: Yes you should ask as an input field with a more generic label invites ambiguity. Placing a clear label (in this case questions) above each control helps establish clear relationship between what you are asking for and ...


18

The general principle here is, as Mervin stated, feature discovery (or accidental discovery). In this specific case, it's an edge case that we really didn't design for explicitly. The more general case is for people that don't have enough rep to vote and allowing them to play around with the interface and discover the capabilities of the site and the ...


18

Because our brains are highly adept at recognizing patterns. To speed things up a bit, our brains gather a lot of data in one go, and attempt to descipher it in stages. The first stage is very quick - it takes the overall shape of a word (high emphasis on start and end letters) and matches it to a word it already knows. As such, 3 and E are alike, but "...


16

I think a user using an app like that (text rendered with no accents when accents are expected) would find it to be very unprofessional. As the accents play an important role in the language, leaving them out could: Cause users to just passed off as bad grammar. Change the meaning of what you are trying to convey. Look like gibberish. As for languages ...


15

There are some politically correct suggestions that we use ISO 639.1 language codes, but the reality is that to most people they mean very little. They are an engineering solution, not a UX solution. If you go with country flags, there are some people that will not like the fact that you showed a US flag for English rather than for Navajo. The same way ...


15

As much as it pains me to say it (as a Brit), if you're not going to have any localisation go with American spellings. This will be the preferred spellings for the vast majority of users - either as native speakers (Americans far outnumber the British) or as second language speakers (though there are significant number of those who use British English ...


15

I am not aware of any heuristics or best practices since there are different use cases depending upon the countries you are designing for. However this excellent article Global by Design : Creating a world-ready web design gives some valuable inputs: Look at the scope of designing a global template (except in unique cases) : A availability of a global ...


15

It's going to be really hard to respond to this question unless we can see a screenshot of what your interface or site currently looks like. However here are some reasons as to why you are not getting a 100% right to left F shaped pattern for your site: Your interface might not be totally right justified as explained by this article : Our usability ...


15

The thing is that in many languages (including Dutch and German), there is no such thing as title case. It simply does not exist, and theirfore "it looks weird" is actually already a nice way of putting it - it is simply wrong. As also highlighted by @the other one, it does not matter to the typical user how it is done in a localization that he does not use.


14

There is no evidence that I have seen that deems the term 'Blacklist' to be offensive; in fact it is valid computer terminology. Being blacklisted is a negative term, but that is the point of the word: Black and White are contrasting. If you need other terms then it's easy to go with 'Blocked List' but then you're left with the opposing side being an '...


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