1

Workshops might not be required in this case, but if they're feasible, they're helpful. Bringing together several people who know something about each customer persona, talking through each experience in detail, can supplement what the customer experience research team has identified. One approach you might want to explore is as-is scenario mapping. Prior to ...


1

You are right, the effect of COVID-19 and the transition into remote work has reduced the effectiveness of many UX artefacts that are often used to help people engage better with the information. The next best thing is probably to make the information available within the intranet (if that's somewhere people visit frequently), or to build some interactivity ...


1

Yes, you can diagram these journeys in many different ways, and I have done this in the past although often the diagram becomes quite complex and the story gets lost sometimes. There are a number of different approaches that I use, some of which might apply to your scenario/situation: Code the steps/stages in the journey in different colours for different ...


1

John, Bruce and Bob are both personas and represent 3 different roles. Personas are fictional characters you create to assume a particular role that you want to represent during research for different user types. If all of John, Bruce and Bob now exist in reality and in the same scenario, they are now users playing different roles when interacting with XYZ....


1

If it's simply the customer journey, from finding, selecting, purchasing and finish, my opinion is they need to be the same, to maintain a consistent customer journey, especially for repeat visitors on multiple platforms. When you move into the customer experience stage of the process - they tend to be unique to the platform and should cater for those ...


1

For sure. The behaviours are different on each. But you'll find the journey crosses both devices and it's unlikely the whole journey will be done on just mobile or just desktop. You need to map what the persona is doing and how s/he is doing it rather than fixating on "how would X complete the journey on mobile vs desktop" That's my advice.


1

From my experience there's clear differences of user behaviour between desktop and mobile. In 2018 mobile market share worldwide was 52.1% compared to desktop market share of 44.2% I would personally look at the journeys in two different sessions. Here's some more useful information about the difference between the two: https://www.interaction-design....


1

I assume the Buyer Persona is your target customer? I.e., the person you will target for the redesign. You're creating a largely provisional Persona and Customer Journey Map, which is fine. Just keep in mind you likely have some assumptions baked into it as you've not used additional customer research to inform it. It's good to use analytical data and other ...


1

A Heuristic map of the flow would be a good idea, at a high level. Combining it with your data can help you create 'How Might We' statements and pin them on the map to see if you're targeting the user problem and correcting the journey. It would be feasible to start moving into the sketching phase of the design process and conduct usability tests on the ...


1

Focus on what matters This is a travel website and your Destinations pages are only 10% of traffic? That seems suspicious. Cross-referencing analytics and user testing you should be able to identify why that is fairly quickly. You'll have to ask yourself a lot of questions about how visitors move specifically to, from, or around that area. Are you ...


1

In your situation, I'd start by defining the user goals for this section of your site. Once I had those, I'd work out what sub-journeys were strictly necessary to meet those goals e.g. the checkout process on an ecommerce website. Then I'd work out what sub-journeys most users would have to take in order to meet the site's user goals. Once I'd done that, ...


1

It just depends on your research objective. Sometimes a persona is a research input, and the learning is scoped around a specific problem and user audience. A usability testing protocol usually (and surveys sometimes) in this case can be written with a specific persona in mind so it is reflective of their needs. In such a case I'd make mention of this up ...


1

Physical representations are usually good if it is done for high level processes or workflows that don't change frequently. As pointed out in the comments, digital solutions are much more flexible and scalable. The same type of interactivity as a physical board can also be replicated if there is a touch screen. One suggestion/advice that would make your life ...


1

What you could do is creating a customer journey map of the current situation and of the desired outcome. Implement changes and do research after appropriate amount of time. (usability testing or interviewing, whatever suits your situation best) Create a customer journey of the new situation so you can visually compare the three situations. Is there ...


1

I think you may be getting a bit confused with what Information Architecture is as it isn't referred to as user flows. The definition of Information Architecture as defined by usability.gov is the following: Information architecture (IA) focuses on organizing, structuring, and labeling content in an effective and sustainable way. The goal is to help ...


1

Key here is Implementation vs. Discovery. These models are used slightly differently depending on life-cycle Designing a New UX Service blueprints identify clearly what a company needs to get in-place to service defined customer needs (implementation of business processes) A Customer Journey should start with understanding the ideal world of a customers ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible