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17

This may be a biased answer, but I think what you really are looking for is an Information Architect. The Information Architect does all of the UX stuff, except Graphic Design. You'll probably get application from people truly interested in the core of UX, who analyze challenges from user needs and work there way from the ground and upward. Wikipedia have ...


8

Jobs you don’t want That's a pretty common sight on the job boards. It's not representative of a real change in the meaning of the term; it just represents an organization trying to "get some UX" by way of a title. It's the product of an executive team that doesn't actually know what UXD is about. Your assessment is correct: What they really want is a ...


8

You really answer this yourself, half-ways: (agency) ... doesn't know the business like we do and can't read our minds. But still, I feel like I'll just be a person that says "yea, that design looks good" or "well, can you move that box over there? It looks better" or "that flow doesn't make sense for our users; re-think it". This is where you come in ...


7

As someone who works as an SEO, let me mention you'd be wise not to use the word 'designer.' Maybe you could phrase it as a "UI/UX Professional" or something along those lines. I also do a lot of analytics so maybe mention being 'data driven' or 'performance-based,' (personal and professional experience leads me to believe that mentioning ROI, analytics, ...


6

Get a new job. Seriously. Life is too short to spend any time at all on people who don’t respect you. And what your boss is doing is fundamentally disrespecting you. Not only is your boss ruining your workday and possibly your health from the stress, he is ruining your career because you are not making progress, not growing in your profession so that you can ...


5

I would use "UX Planner" or "UX Strategist".


5

Like a lot of UXers, you seem to think that UX doesn’t define what you design, but how to design. However, those outside our field don’t see it that way. Do a search for jobs for “UX Designer” and you’ll see that business equates “UX designer” with software user interface designer. They even slash them together: “UX/UI Designer.” So dropping “UX” would ...


4

What do you design? There is still room to qualify exactly what you design. I'm a Product Designer. When the need arises, I might work with Motion Designers, Graphic Designers, Industrial Designers, or Service Designers. We all think about experience, context, user, etc. In a way, we are all Experience Designers. In that respect, some people are tiring of ...


3

Here is a great article from fastcodesign that I think explains it really well. Here is a an excerpt: INTERACTION DESIGNER (MOTION DESIGNER) Remember the subtle bouncing animation when you pull to refresh in the Mail app on your iPhone? That's the work of a motion designer. Unlike visual designers who usually deal with static assets, motion designers create ...


3

From a UX perspective, there should be one field: Your Resume EDIT: The point of my answer from a UX perspective is that a user already has a resume. The smoothest process is to upload that resume and be done with it. There are things you can do with that resume. On one level, you can parse it out and let a user validate the sections. I've seen systems ...


3

Speaking as somebody who occasionally sits on the interviewing side of the table I would not care at all what tool you chose to use. Balsamiq. Sketches on paper. Keynote. Whatever. What I would care about was that you could explain the design decisions to me, and that the deliverable does the job intended. If your not sure what kind of artefact and for ...


3

May I recommend the Nielsen Norman Group's certification. These guys are gods when it comes to UX and I've attended one of their sessions and it was a great experience. More here: https://www.nngroup.com/ux-certification/


3

Interesting question, this is how I intend them: Front-end Developer- the main difference can be one word: programming, this person can participate in the design process (visually) and develop mechanisms of action and behavior of elements (during interactions), however the main responsibility is transform design project to working software (implementation ...


2

Honestly, it depends on if it's UI or UX. Interfaces are going to be more visual, and may require you to produce a more mid-fidelity prototype such as you would on Balsamiq, Moqups, or Froont. On the flip-side, if you're interviewing for UX, notes and scribbles may be more important to help describe your actions. Of course, some of those tools would still ...


2

I think you have to tailor your education/training to the type of job and organization you are looking to join. As far as I can see, there are three essential elements: Ability - if they are paying you to do a job, then they need to be confident that you have the skills and knowledge Experience - if you are not working on a standard project or just carrying ...


2

It sounds like you are questioning whether you want to work on a project in this type of a role, and you are concerned about building your skills while working on this type of a project. These are valid concerns, especially if your passion is to be the person who works through the concepts at the nitty gritty level. I've also gone through a process in the ...


2

Simple answer is own the UX strategy. Use the external agency as your 'doers'. Own the big stuff and let them focus on colours, box locations etc. As you are internal you will have a better understanding of the company and it's needs. A good UX is when the user needs and the business leads overlap. It does sound like you're not really UX that much anyway, ...


2

In my experience it is always best to ask as questions before you even apply for a UX job. Things that worry me because they are not mentioned in a job spec are... Whiteboard/workshop problem definition - What problems are we trying to solve? Persona creation/definition - Who are the users and what are their pains, tasks and goals? User and customer ...


2

Let's start with the meaning of User Experience. Summary: "User experience" encompasses all aspects of the end-user's interaction with the company, its services, and its products. Source: NNGroup https://www.nngroup.com/articles/definition-user-experience/ Responsibilities You're not only responsible for a logic design. UX is the center of many ...


2

Yes, it's possible. However, having prior work experience really helps especially if it's related to UX. I was in a similar situation to you, but because I had relevant work experience for 5 years, I was accepted to https://uclic.ucl.ac.uk which is regarded as one of the best HCI programs.


2

Your ideas are all good ones, but you have quite a job ahead of you, unless you are very lucky and the organization KNOWS it needs UX and is ready and willing. Your approach will need to be multi fold: Find a project you can knock out of the park and do it Use that as leverage to gain credibility as you do your education tour Build relationships, networks ...


2

You usually need to communicate a lot with the people involved with the product (devs, product owners). And working remotely makes it harder to quickly get feedback on your wireframes and ask questions.


2

Most designers find remote work challenging in some way and a lot of companies hire just project-based or part-time for a remote position. I worked 10 years remote, in some cases even full-time, for 6 months+ collaborations. For me was a natural choice because I wanted to stay in my city and I didn't find a job at the level I wanted to do design. From ...


1

Do you have any industry experience to fall back on? Even just a good head on your shoulders, a sense of empathy and human nature, and good communication skills? You might consider looking into the Bentley Masters of Human Factors and Interface Design program in Waltham, MA, USA. http://www.bentley.edu/graduate/ms-programs/hfid It is widely considered one ...


1

Is your pride getting in your way? Seek for collaboration rather than working in silo. If it helps, get other stakeholders to join in the discussion. It helps your supervisor to see that his opinion is not always the most ideal. If there are no other stakeholders, casually asked your colleague for a third opinion in the presence of your supervisor. There ...


1

You could. A lot of great designers were once (or still are) developers. Two come hand in hand in my opinion, because both look at very small details and how it affects the application as a whole. Both fields are very logical and research driven. But consider this however: Studying about development and being a coder, you will be more geared towards the ...


1

From a quick look at the page, it would seem that one way of handling this is to issue a page wide banner/overlay which identifies errors and on-click the user is directed to the element which is wrong/missing. The element can also be highlighted.


1

well, I did a quick mock of a possible solution using Google Material. Basically an off-canvas drawer with an action button that allows you to go back and forth and see everything in the description. Of course, all the Material specs are used, such as sheets, floating actions and scrims but you can easily see what I mean and adapt it to your needs


1

Zaharenia here, designer of Workable. Thanks for your detailed writeup on this. First of all, I’d like to point out that you can expand the job description by clicking on the down arrow to the right of the job title. It’s obvious that this solution is not optimal :) When we redesigned our careers pages, our first priority was to create a streamlined ...


1

What does it take to be in this role? It takes a business card that has "senior" in your job title. That's really all. It's nothing specific other than, in theory, you have more experience than the other folks on the team (and hopefully a correlated higher salary).


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