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16

As per this study done by the mobile usage firm Onswipe, the general usage is predominantly landscape. To quote the article Mobile usage analysis firm Onswipe, as part of a slideshow celebrating its second year of operation, revealed some further analysis of user data from iPads that in some cases reveal interesting habits and in others reinforce ...


11

From the top of my head, I remember two UI designs that you could add there. First one is a rule on Android app design side. When a player HOLD the skill for one second, that is, make a long-press, show the small panel with the skill name. Maybe give a slight vibration on the device to get it to know it. The second may not work well if the game requires ...


8

Apple's iOS guidelines say to "Think twice before hiding the status bar if your app is not a game or full-screen media-viewing app." I think their attitude is that if you don't really need the extra space, leave the status bar visible so people can see the time and battery life. Also, from same link above, "don't create a custom status bar."


8

Let's take a step back and look at your business model. Should you even include ads in your app in the first place? Are they likely to be successful? For advertising, context is everything. In general, ads are most effective when the user has what is called "commercial intent", meaning they are looking to make a purchase. The next most effective ad is when ...


7

I think this has a lot more to do with the look and feel of your app. If your settings is using apple's default styling then you should definitely keep everything consistent. No point giving your users two ways of yes/no. Even apple uses UI styles that are not in the HIG, e.g. (Settings > Notifications > Mail > Alert Style). A lot of apps use custom ...


7

First off, I'm not sure why you think that replacing an iOS switch with a check-box will free up a "significant amount of space" and what "better use" you could have for it because a switch is at most 3-times as wide as a checkbox. Secondly, iOS Human Interface Guidelines are very clear on the use of controls. They say people should interact in "gestures, ...


7

First, I think it's about how people think about their workflow. It's an emphasis on "how" instead of "where": http://www.malcolmgroves.com/blog/?p=633 Windows has been promoting the doc-centric view of the world for a long time. I remember that being one of the supposed big advantages of Windows 95, the ability to focus on your documents and not the ...


7

I suggest you should use 'select+drag' approach instead. This is similar to 'double-tap-drag' described by PhonicUK but doesn't require immediate drag. User selects an item first by tapping it once, the item is then highlighted and ready for a drag operation. Other items won't accept drag until they are selected so scrolling is still available. I think I'...


7

You can use a menu with options / information, with two interaction options: Option 1 (I consider this one more intuitive). Tap -> Opens the menu Double Tap -> Uses the item directly Tap option in menu / Tap close button -> Close the menu / Close the menu and perform the action. Option 2 (This one could work with power users). Drag -> Open the menu Tap ...


7

I think you'd be surprised how smart users are, most of them are able to quickly distinguish native controls from web controls. That being said, as long as you don't deliberately try to make your controls look like part of the browser you should be ok (this is an anti-pattern that malware often uses to imitate system controls). In the Facebook and BBC ...


6

In most photo apps I know there the tap+hold or longtap event that triggers some sort of contextual menu with further options like export, mail to someone, etc. Look at mobile safari for instance. Tap and hold on a link and an action sheet with some actions appears. This is used widely in apples apps. You can see that in safari on the "+" icon (favorite), in ...


6

If you have a lot of skills/items you can have a help circle in a specific place in your UI that will be a target place for DRAGGING items to see the help / tooltip. Touch the potion Drag it to the help circle on the bottom right of your UI and release it there The help tooltip appear


6

The problem I'm seeing is that your CTA button is so far away from the icon and headline that they don't seem related. Move the "Get Started" button close to the "Scan bar code" and you should eliminate the "white space" issue.


5

Refer to iPhone email app: it allows users to manage a lot of mails. Its UI pattern may help. First you tap "Edit" button, then you tap each photo you like to manage, lastly you tap one of the options located at the bottom of a screen. Googled images: This UI solves: Edit is not a hidden feature (like tap and hold in Safari) You wont do changes by ...


5

As you suggest yourself: Pan: Move with single finger. Zoom: Pinch. Move: Select object + Move with single finger. Multi-selection: I would suggest a mode solution here. Even though I hate modes, and even if lots of research has shown that modes are confusing for the end user - the use of modes has become a pretty common on touch devices. You could ...


5

Ads on mobile apps sucks, and badly. Not only because you don't want user to accidently tap them (as @DA01 rightly said) and take them out of your app, but also it affects the performance. Having said that, You can try these two ad placement ideas 1) Show the ad when you are navigating or showing loading screen before showing a new content. 2) If your ...


5

iOS segmented controls are only recommended for switching views, as stated in the Apple HIG: A segmented control is a linear set of segments, each of which functions as a button than can display a different view You can think of them as the iOS equivalent to Android view control spinner. If every mutually exclusive choice open a new set of fields and ...


4

Use a semi transparant overlay, similar to a modal screen. See attached. Though you'll probably need to modify the layout...


4

There seems to be an established standard for no border with iOS app icons. I see no reason to break this convention with your current design. The no border icon you posted even looks a lot better than the border one (although I do like the border on your logo).


4

As a rule of thumb, ask users to confirm any action that doesn't have a corresponding symmetric action, especially if the action has some "weight" to the user. This "weight" can come from several things: The action has some real money associated (possibly with intermediary ficational currency) The action has some significant time investment associated (time ...


4

The clues to the answer lie in the wording of the question. Should I allow...should I constrain it. i.e. You are asking if you should restrict the user activities. Typically users have an expectation of interaction with a map via familiarity with other applications. They expect to be able to pan and zoom. Often this functionality comes free with a map ...


4

I would suggest not - many cases for the iPad hold it elevated in landscape, so a user with the screen raised would not be able to use your calculator. I can't provide figures, but would suggest that looking at the most popular calculator apps should give you some indication about which designs are succeeding and failing on the app store.


4

If you're talking just about resolution and not the interaction, then you can consider the iPad/Top range android tablets as desktops, since they have enough resolution to fit the content in a single view. But, when thinking of interaction you have to differentiate into desktop (mouse+keyboard) vs mobile (touch+gesture).


4

For what concern the Apple HIG, the only thing that is stated in the guideline section is exactly: Use a segmented control to offer closely related, but mutually exclusive choices. For what concern the effect of selecting a segment, it doesn't sound that strict. It says that can display a different view, but it's not imposed. Given that some apps ...


4

My only experience comes from what i have learned at school and experienced myself. So here comes my humble opinion on the topic. First of all there are different types but i don't know if there are better names than these: inception scrolling: if the page can scroll vertical, and a certain field on the page can also scroll vertical OR if the page can ...


3

Use the same affordances you would with any button. When you register a click event, animate the given item to indicate that it is depressed. Exactly how you animate it depends entirely on your interface; you may be doing 3d emulation with highlighted borders, you may be doing flat style where you just increase the saturation, but make your items animate the ...


3

I would recommend two actions: Keep the thumbnails screen clean, minimizing the chrome and buttons. A tap on a thumbnail opens a new screen that contains the photo and an action bar with all the desktop context menu options. You can hide this action bar in a few seconds (or with a user tap) to keep the photo alone. This way you have a safe and visible ...


3

Start by reading Facebook share for developers and use some of the standard icons/buttons available. It's much easier for a user if she recognizes the button from other applications and web pages.


3

Interesting question but perhaps not suitable as there is not one right answer. Contextual to the control You invented a concept with many new controls, like a button that looks like a door or a painting. It looks great and may be great to use when learnt, but unlike standard gui controls, it is not obvious what is clickable, dragable, openable, editable, ...


3

From the comment "this is a philosophical question that doesn't have an answer" - Yes, it indeed is. The philosophy behind this is Steve Job's obsession to be in complete control over the user experience of the device. By allowing access to the file system, Apple is relinquishing control to the user, who may be a bit naive and do stuff Apple may not want to ...


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