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4

You should give the user control over refreshing the data, give them a notification that new data is available (or that data has changed) and tell them that they can refresh the view by pulling. You already mentioned the big con of updating it without user interaction. But, as always, it depends on the use-case. If you have data that changes every 2-3 ...


3

Yes, it is the same with iOS and the tab bar should be visible everywhere. Don't hide a tab bar when people navigate to different areas in your app. A tab bar enables global navigation for your app, so it should remain visible everywhere. (Source)


2

Considering left-to-right mentality, I think, the difference is this: If it’s to the left, the user will read it as “we’re working, and here’s why...” - they’ll “read” the indicator first and then, if confused or interested, the description for it that will clarify what’s happening. If it’s to the right, the user will read it as “we’re doing this and this,...


2

For guidance, I'll reference an answer on this site to similar questions: From a UX perspective [the press-and-hold (or long press) gesture] is kind of odd, since there are no clues that the long press exist on an object, and the user is left to trying it out if they haven’t read the manual. -- Benny Skogberg The long-press is a functionality users ...


2

Option 4 Since you want to show the 2 charts, I am assuming the user's motivation is to compare multiple datasets over a period of time. As sessions and time duration are closely connected I feel putting them together on a single chart will provide more inferential insights. Pros Contextual data at the same place Easy to identify a trend Cons Confuse ...


2

As mentioned by @katriel, the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are the official W3C specs on how to create accessible applications (whether web or mobile). Version 2.0 came out in 2008 and Version 2.1 came out in June 2018. Most country laws are based on Version 2.0 (at least for now) but that will be changing. The European Union is typically ...


2

I think it is based on the user expectations and as a user, I don't expect to see the "Home" button in the top-left of the screen in a mobile application Expectations with the home button in an app When I see just a Home icon, I would be hesitant to click it because I can't be sure of how to get back to the previous screen. Also, I might not be aware of ...


2

Take Googles Material Icons page for instance - is there anything similar at all for iOS? Yes there is. Apple makes a difference between app icons and system icons, which are more similar to those listed at Material Design, just take a look to System Icons (iOS 12 and Earlier) . From iOS13, the icons change to SF Symbols, with 1500+ icons in different ...


2

iOS recommends using PDF as the vector format for custom icons, see this link Prepare glyphs with a scale factor of @2x and save them as PDFs. Because PDF is a vector format that allows for high-resolution scaling, it's typically sufficient to provide a single @2x version in your app and allow it to scale for other resolutions.


1

Is it a walk-through or is it an onboarding ? You mention it is an walk-through but it sounds more of an onboarding. If it is an onboarding ( Feature presentation ) I would place it when the app opens for the first time. If it is walkthrough ( Explaining functionality ) I would place it after sign-up. Onboarding is what encourages a user to sign up to ...


1

From the user end, long press is not going to help. even button with name/title. I'd suggest button with an icon


1

Apps must get permission to access private data (even if they are technically capable of getting it without asking). You and those who work on your app may be trustworthy and only use the contact data for displaying a list, but this is not always the case. When using Apple's CNContactPickerViewController from ContactsUI "The app using contact picker view ...


1

Yes, it is necessary to ask permission when accessing native tools like contacts, camera, etc. It has been designed this way to protect the user from an application asking for or gaining access without their expressed consent. Imagine if an app labeled that action with something that had nothing to do with accessing contacts and the user clicked on it. ...


1

Devices often share similar screen dimensions, so it would take forever to create a version for every possible device configuration. The most efficient way would be to create a single, scalable layout (see Material Design, for example) for each device type, e.g. phone, tablet, and desktop. However, you could consider creating versions for each operating ...


1

Different design teams. The app store bar is not in the nav bar has a longer title, so I assume it did not fit. The iTunes one, probably a stronger focus on the content to have those pixels available for selling.


1

This is how Apple do yes/no answers in their ResearchKit application - http://researchkit.org/docs/docs/Survey/CreatingSurveys.html


1

Each app developer has their own method for building and there are numerous ways to do it, as such, there is no set method. As UI/UX designers, our goal for the app developer is that they build out the app as we had imagined it. Therefore, you should ask the developer that you are working with what they need from you to develop the app. The goal is to make ...


1

Changing the layout of your content area while the user is reading something would drastically downgrade the user experience. I would say that a manual reload is mandatory, either by pulling to refresh or clicking on a button, depending on how you are implementing your application. For example in my experience, a pull to refresh is tedious in applications ...


1

Like exp mentioned in the other answer, both the approaches have different narratives that makes sense. Adding to that: Visual designer can direct the flow of reading in a correct way. Though having an icon to the right may appear optically balanced, the reading flow will be broken because of the bold stroke, dark colored icon. Adding to it the animation ...


1

Considering both landscape and portrait orientations (perhaps even more: square...or special form factors) is "doing it right". Most designers, developers, and teams don't do it right. I try to get everyone to do it right, that is raising the bar. The result is a more usable app, that works better than competitors, and even runs less risk in terms of being ...


1

All apps have one primary orientation and design can start keeping only that orientation in mind. It is not necessary to design for both orientations simultaneously, this can be added later on.


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