Hot answers tagged

59

The physical mute and volume buttons affect all other apps too. It's better to have a mute button in your app because as a user I may only want to mute the notifications from your app and not others. For example, there's a chance I want to mute Facebook notifications but not those from Twitter. So for that I'd need a mute button in Facebook because the ...


47

I was recently researching the use of Material Design in iOS apps and came across this UpLabs article which makes an interesting point: Various elements both visual and underline mechanics could certainly be incorporated into iOS apps. However, it is important to stay true to the operating systems nature. Forcing a user to adapt or take on new sets of ...


43

First, regarding answer that you linked, I think what Apple was having an issue with is the use of the same UI as their slide to power off, not the use of that UX/interaction. They just don't want it to be styled to resemble their power off slider as to not confuse users. If you were to create say, a small blue slider, or a slider that moves in a circle ...


42

After looking at some of the reviews, I'm finding a few common problems that relate to UX. People want to import their own models. They expected this to be an option. The instructions are unclear. Since this is an animation program, the learning curve is going to be a bit higher than normal. Consider making some tutorial videos, or documentation. People ...


40

Even though Apple recommended (and surprisingly still recommends) pickers for dropdowns, not even they use it anymore. Spoilers: In both these cases, the "logic" would dictate to use a dropdown + picker. Apple chose a much better solution for their own apps. Still, a whole screen to pick between "Female" or "Male" (pardon the binary example) seems ...


36

Usually this is done using a table view, which is basically a list of items as well, only with a checkmark instead of a radio button. Sometimes such lists are on a new 'page' in the navigation structure. How this fits in your navigational structure depends on the context.


35

To send money in my banking app, I must drag a symbol into a target. It is difficult to do accidentally, but quick to accomplish. It may be difficult for someone with limited dexterity or someone who is distracted.


28

I'll make this an answer so I can expand on my comment. Your main problem is not an arrow, icon, color or emoji thing. Your main problem is a conceptual one: you're mixing taxonomies with gradations that might be (they actually are!) absolutely opposed. Thus, you're adding a load where user has to make an interpretation of whether your taxonomy and your ...


22

I haven't thought this through, but there might be mileage in considering the physical equivalent. On many control panels, such as in power plants or aircraft, the especially dangerous actions have a switch cover that must be lifted before the button can be used. My suggestion is a control that's normally in a "locked" state, and takes an action to unlock ...


21

Acceptable? Yes, you can have no music, or maybe some generic noisy background if you want to add something to the full audiovisual experience. Now, unless you're really short on budget, I'd recommend you to use music for your app. The more original and in tune with your game, the better. Not only because you're creating a full sensorial experience, but ...


20

Perhaps you could use only black for the arrows so that the user knows of the increase or decrease, place them on the left, and then on the right use a "health-bar" style status report which would look professional and could indicate the positive/negative aspect and even severity. (Use colors other than Red/Green if you are worried about color blind issues) ...


20

In iOS tapping the label does not enable/disable the switch. Go with what ever the convention that is part of the respective operating systems, as the users of those systems will expect the behaviour they are used to. iOS: Label is not tappable Android (as far as I'm aware): Label is tappable With regard to the guidelines I'm not 100% sure but it maybe ...


16

I don't think it's a problem. There are many applications for iOS that use Material Design. Think of all the Google applications (Youtube, GMail, etc) iOS users use on a daily basis. You might want to consider using Material Design as a source of inspiration. Make use of their behaviours or specific elements, but also use your own research and branding. I'...


15

Yes, you do. Something is upsetting a significant portion of your users. The experience they are having is, to put it politely, sub-optimal. Therefore you have a User Experience problem. I suspect however you were actually asking if you had a UI problem. Without more information it's very hard to know what the problem actually is. But here are some ...


15

New in iOS 11 you can find the Floating Action Button within the Notes App. If Apple uses them, you could definitely use them too.


14

Asking for feedback is no good from UX perspective at all, but it is good from the conversion point of view. You need ratings, as they convert to downloads, of course only if they are good good. Before asking a question, you need to make sure user got familiar with using the app. So asking for this before this moment is a waste and will either not result in ...


14

Material Design is not "Android design", it's Google's all encompassing design "template" for both mobile and web apps. Many Google web products use Material Design like Angular (https://angular.io/) or, you know, Material Design site itself (https://material.io/guidelines/). They even have a library made specially for the web called Material Design Lite ...


13

Apple likes switches Sliding switches were a nifty looking control way back when. They were one way for iOS to announce "Hey, look! I like gestures. You should swipe stuff." In a short list where you might want to flip your wifi or Bluetooth off to save some battery, it works okay. When you have a list of selectable items, iOS asks you to think of ...


13

TL;DR: An app forcing me to use the global mute would be uninstalled in the blink of an eye. So they better have a mute function if they want to use audio at all. EDIT: The previous was a bit too short for an answer, here's an explanation: Audio is in essence quite intrusive, that is, you can hardly block it out. That's different from vision - you can ...


13

Some users won't want to give a second app access to their Facebook or Google information. Some apps only require Facebook login (for example) to ensure the identity of the user. This is because it is important for the service the app offers. In those cases having verified users gives a better user experience for the rest of users, so it is beneficial in ...


13

Additional ideas from this article: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2018/01/friction-ux-design-tool/ Delaying the action and allow a window time for users to "undo" Extra step for security, such as asking for fingerprint Other types of authentication such as re asking password or 2-factor authentication. Other articles dealing with the same topic: https:...


12

The main reason for the guidelines on all the OSes for application developers is so that they can maintain a look and feel of the app which is quite similar to OS itself. This is one of the reasons why you should use the system controls and widgets as far as possible, rather than reinventing your own style. With that in mind, it is always in your interest ...


12

There are various approaches to this problem, but largely you need to consider the use of whitespace, grouping, and symmetry to create a balanced impression, as well as whether one or two of the images might reasonably act as primary images. Websites like Google and Flickr generally tend to resize some images to fit nicely into a row, but when your row only ...


12

To not lose context. At least according to Adrian Zumbrunnen, who wrote the article Smart Transitions in User Experience design. He ment that on a single page, which on mobile, can be very long if three columns are made to one, user suffer from the loss of context. If a user clicks a link and you imediately jump to another anchor, without showing the way, ...


12

iOS makes it much easier to use "Pickers". These may work depending on what you need the "Dropdown" to do. See new link https://developer.apple.com/ios/human-interface-guidelines/controls/pickers/


12

TL;DR: I consider the Floating Action Button (FAB) to be the most polarizing element of Material Design, and generally wouldn't recommend a floating action button for use in an iOS application. The principle is still sound: provide a strong call-to-action element (CTA) to guide your users. Apple tends to favor the top-right interaction, but I consider the ...


11

I wrote a highly customizable radio button control for iOS. It supports both obj-c and swift. Hope it helps!


11

I see the tab used as a primary navigation and placed at the bottom of the screen, whereas the segmented controller is more like a local switch inside a particular screen and is usually placed at the top. They are quite similar in terms of functionality, they just differ visually in the sense that the bottom tab is heavier and conveys more important actions ...


11

The Apple Human Interface Guidelines are 'Guidelines', not 'rules' - you don't have to follow them entirely, design and build what you like.


11

I have always liked these icons, which indicate a trend on a graph. The combined shape and direction of the arrow indicate how the trend is progressing. I got these from Ionicons: http://ionicons.com/


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