182

Option 2 is the best option, because you'll recognize your own language regardless of your knowledge of other languages (be sure to also provide character sets if you support for example Japanese) Problems with options 1 and 3 Option 1. If you don't speak / understand the current language you may not recognize your own language. In the example Germans ...


113

Option 2 is the way to go as you should always show languages listed by the way they are written in that language. It is the way both Wikipedia and most companies that deal in many languages do it. Here is how Apple handle it: Problems with the other options Option 1 is a headache to maintain as you need to have the name of every language in every other ...


40

If you're dealing with geographical distances, just use miles. We never think of towns being X feet or yards away from each other. Our street signs (and mapping apps, etc.) show decimals, so that's a good way to handle fractional miles. Even under a mile we're used to seeing distances like 0.2 miles. (One decimal place is usually enough.) Even when things ...


36

It depends directly on the language and if the diacritic produces a new letter or simply a variation of the same letter. In French (or Italian, Catalan, Portuguese...), accented characters (such as À, É, Ê, Ô, Ö, etc.) doesn't produce a new letter, they are only variation of the same letter. As such, one would expect words starting with an accented ...


35

The short answer is no, don't use country flags. http://www.456bereastreet.com/archive/200604/indicating_language_choice_flags_text_both_neither/ The preferred method is to use the name of the language in the language itself (and watch out for diacriticals, language specific capitalization, etc). I'd say that using a flag only is a big no-no The ...


28

The mental image of time is indeed thought to be influenced by language and culture. Scientists discovered years ago that spatial representations of time are affected greatly by linguistic conventions. If English is your native tongue, you're likely to think of time as moving from left to right, but if Arabic is your language of choice, time moves ...


27

Source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimal_mark In Albania, Belgium, Bosnia, Estonia, France, Finland, Hungary, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia and much of Latin Europe as well as French Canada: 1 234 567,89 (In Spain, in handwriting it is also common to use an upper comma: 1.234.567'89) In Brazil, Germany, Netherlands, Denmark, Italy, ...


27

Option 2 is the best, since user can always recognize its own language. There's is a small pitfall though. If you present language selector as dropdown, user won't see any values except current auto-detected language, unless he clicks it. And if user doesn't understand currently selected language - say, already mentioned Chinese, he might won't even notice ...


26

If you're going to bother localizing your interface, you might as well do it fully and respect the language or region's common practices. As you mention localization, I assume this means that you will change the placement of the currency symbol based on the locale setting of the user's interface, rather than the locale of the currency symbol used. Take ...


19

The problems with this approach are: You're choosing languages to demonstrate this that have an arguably stronger association with specific countries, so the solution seems better than it is. You are also assuming that everyone that speaks Spanish knows what the Spanish flag looks like, which is not necessarily true. Someone from Nicaragua doesn't have a ...


16

People can reach non-front-pages of your website by many means, so you should have some indication on every page that it is possible to switch languages. If the clean design is that important that you don't want the complete language switching widget on every page you should at least provide an obvious link to the page (or pop up) that enables language ...


15

There are some politically correct suggestions that we use ISO 639.1 language codes, but the reality is that to most people they mean very little. They are an engineering solution, not a UX solution. If you go with country flags, there are some people that will not like the fact that you showed a US flag for English rather than for Navajo. The same way ...


13

Disclaimer: I am not a native speaker of a language which does use guillemets as a way to denote quotes. But I wanted to offer a view on how context can help identify if the content being referenced is a phrase or a case of pagination I believe there are two aspects to it I believe this is one of those cases where users can visualize whether a phrase is ...


12

To expand on: You're challenging national identities. If someone is from Austria, they need to choose a German flag. While that may not be a big deal to you, to many Austrians it is. Germany vs. Austria or US vs. GB are relatively harmless examples. I assume in most cases you'd get mild annoyance from the side you didn't choose. But for other countries ...


12

No, because a single country may and often does have multiple languages.


12

Microsoft has their terminology online and for download: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/language This should contain all default things you need.


11

I think you should not restrict it at all (meaning: setting the limit at a very high level). It is hard, if not impossible, to determine how long the fields should be, but they cannot be too short, that's for sure. Names, cities, streets can be really long. Just check these to get some perspective: Longest place names in the world: http://en.wikipedia.org/...


11

In the Arabic world, time series charts are more often shown as right-to-left, as this flows more naturally with reading from right-to-left. Al Jazeera (a large Arabic based news organisation) for example user right-to-left charts quite regularly, as shown below. Note that I have no idea what this chart is referring to. However, most speakers of right-to-...


10

You're wondering whether the question-mark icon is universally recognised. There are two parts to this: Do your users have prior experience with a question-mark icon? Will your users recognize YOUR question-mark icon as offering Help? I can only answer the first question. I did a quick search of the various style guides. To sum up: The Microsoft Windows ...


10

While it depends on your demographics, I would say yes, you should translate it. It also depends on whether you are translating everything else. Having a translated control in the middle of other untranslated controls (or content) is somewhat confusing and definitely looks bad, as if the designer / developer did not care. About your specific question: we ...


9

Mnemonics don't translate well and retaining their mnemonic nature. However, that isn't a critical issue. For example, the common ctrl(or command) + X, C, V, A, W, Q are the standard shortcut in many languages even when they have no associated mnemonic. Even in English many common shortcuts have no mnemonic link. Consistency is significantly more ...


9

I have noticed a soft crossover from mi to feet on street signs around 1000ft (0.19) I say its a soft crossover, because you will see things like 0.1mi, but its much more unusual to see distances longer than 1000ft rendered in feet. I've seen very few signs use yards, although I can't say if that's universal.


8

I am sure this has been asked before, but I cannot find it. Anyhow, there are a few of rules generally to apply to this sort of thing. Do not confuse currencies with countries. It gets very complex. They are NOT the same, even though many countries and currencies do match one-to-one. Do not use IP lookup to guess users location. This worked for a while, but ...


8

Generally, the official flag is an accepted representation of the country (not language as OP mentions) because each country has only 1 current civilian flag. However, there could also be separate flags for the navy, for the head of state, the military, and other special purposes. The official flag shouldn't create any controversies or misunderstandings. ...


8

My vote goes for option #2. If you're looking to change the language because you don't understand whatever the default is, it will be a lot more effective to see the choices in a language you do understand. That's kinda the point, right? I also ran across this article from 456 Berea Street where the author prefers a combination of your options 1 and 2, (...


8

The only valid option is #2, as it's the only one that ensures a visitor is going to recognise a language name. In the other two scenarios you're assuming the visitor is going to understand a second language, and that's a big assumption.


8

There are very few advantages to using all caps, and that is why we usually don't. When we read text, largely what our brains are doing is recognizing the overall shape of words, rather than the individual letters. Lowercase letters have different sizes and visual densities; some have ascenders sticking up, or descenders sticking down. This means that ...


8

In this case, I would argue that there's no benefit to knowing the names the Russian players have chosen for themselves. The characters are in a different realm, so you can't contact them outside of the battle. Even if you did create a good machine transliteration, half of the character names are probably going to be genital references anyway. All you really ...


8

You mention that other fields are validated but not the region field, that your primary motivation is for mailing addresses. If this helps you at all, only one of those countries you mention in your list of examples (USA) uses the region name in the mailing address. I took an entirely unscientific examination of a random set of industrialised or ...


7

There is little point in localizing just a part of a currency presentation and using non-localized or wrongly localization notations otherwise. It may confuse, and it gives the impression of half-hearted localization efforts. The CLDR database contains information about the placement of currency denotations, too. They would not have included it if they ...


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