127

Your objective is to draw your client's attention towards not doing business with PEP, therefore you could highlight just that and avoid the opposite sounding PEP: Yes/No combination. Leaving the non-PEP blank conveys the required message. Alternate design for PEP: Update: You could explicitly show an indication for non-PEP as well: Alternate designs for ...


74

You can change the button to reflect the only available action, but separate the display of state. You've replaced the button label with the only available action: reverting (unregistering). Where it starts to get a little confusing is you have a checkmark alongside the button label. One approach is to separate them. Separate the status 'You are attending'...


52

You don't need to make different appearances for these components. Your case is similar to well-known toggles in a toolbar of text processors like Word. These font settings toggles act like checkboxes: And these Word’s alignment controls act like radio buttons: Note, they look identically and it doesn't produce any confusion or difficulties because in our ...


33

It depends. How often do your users see this form / section / settings? Frequently used, long session applications give users a chance to remember how controls work, especially frequently used ones. Part of this has to do with Application Posture. A sovereign application is a program that monopolizes the user's attention for long periods of time. ...


32

I think you are putting too much expectation in the video without any prior warning of what will happen. I have the image of the Olympic's dive: before the jump there's an animation on the screen of how the action will be performed with some technical info, so the viewers already know what they will see. The same thing you can use in your application, find ...


31

TL;DR: Not that popular currently but might become so again in the future. In your case I'd look for an additional option if possible. Edit: Because of RonJohn's comment and the many people who agreed, I decided to remake the charts in "true" form, so the numbers look less manipulative. Scanova.io cites a few surveys across the years and claims it's on the ...


15

Think of it the other way: Not every user has the same level of familiarity, and other sites don't conform to the same standards. Clicking outside the content, or using the esc key to dismiss a dialog vary widely throughout the web. Many sites have frustrating dark patterns for lightbox content Oftentimes dialogs (used to collect email addresses / ...


13

In the US and Western Europe it's not used much. The stats are actually quite dismal. I see very few applications generating interest in QR codes. Skiing and hiking trails where one doesn't need to take off ones gloves is a niche-market exception. On the other hand QR codes are really big in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Korea so if your market has a ...


10

I would keep the general style of the button, to be consistent. However I think the most important thing is to confirm that you have registered, and not have this state be confusingly similar to not being registered, except for "Un". Since the important thing is that you have already registered I would put that on top, with the unregister button underneath. ...


8

The most relevant problem and very common in the UI design is the absence of contrast. I guess the image at the question is just a part of a whole design. Being just that part, it has five different shape typologies, talking just about shapes, not functionality: An icon in a circle Three "silhouetted" icons A tiny inverted triangle A blue rounded rectangle ...


8

I've actually done a fair amount of work with QR codes in the past. It all depends on their implementation. If you simply slap a QR code on a poster - not so helpful. If it has a purpose and an incentive - people WILL scan them. They are widely popular in some countries. Basically - you've gotta give someone a reason to scan it.


8

Also - you can customize / brand your QR codes to make them more visually intriguing – so long as you build in around 30% error correction. Here's a couple of examples one some I did (way back in the day).


7

It is worth considering using time intervals. I think that a counting counter for example from 5-0 could work here (or other time period) A lot depends on the context and environment in which the user is located It's possibilty to omit the CTA, instead user the counter which changes the step every designated (convenient) time interval. this approach will ...


6

For comparison, social media sites usually have something like that button for following/unfollowing. Some examples: Tumblr: Reddit: Twitter: YouTube: Facebook:


6

I think your designer colleagues are right. If I now look at the options, I have straightforward an idea how I can interact with them and for what they are used. Using the squares for checkboxes and circles for radio buttons are very old, common and recognizable for most of the users. So, it simplyfies your problem in this case.


5

I would use both techniques if the second one is feasible for your workplace. However, if you are using both, you can make the first one just a LITTLE easier than typing a word by adding an extra step as the following: The user needs to check the checkbox before deleting. The actual implementation disables the Delete button till the checkbox is checked. ...


5

Go for the Simpler one. It is the shape of the tags that is the actual problem. They make it look like buttons. Moreover, they are also presented together which creates the illusion This refers to the perceived and actual properties of the thing, primarily those fundamental properties that determine just how the thing could possibly be used or in short ...


5

You should have a QR code, whether on screen or paper. It is important to note that both Android and iOS come with default QR readers. QR code is the easiest way to pass a URL. Unless your application is on the App Store, it will be difficult to get to the application download page without a QR code.


5

Are you using voice/verbal instructions? Cause you should! Like in any dance or martial arts related class, I think the best way we can learn to do some new or unknown movement is to receive clear physical and verbal instructions, starting with a step by step slow pace explanation accompanied with physical demonstration and verbal instructions. Mimicking ...


5

It is usually a good idea to disable the Next button until a require activity has been completed. You know your users can't complete the activity in less than 15 seconds. I will propose then to disable the next button for 15 seconds. Write on the disabled button a message like "watch instruction first".


4

I would say to avoid this because of: Affordance. It's not obvious the user needs to click twice to delete until they try it/do it the first time. Many users are skittish to try things they don't fully understand, especially when it comes to destructive actions like deletion. Overloading. Double clicking already means something in a lot of UIs, so re-...


4

I'd like to suggest this. Keep the nesting aside like my wireframe. in here the user can identify the nesting order. when clicking the nesting area, left side same row getting highlighted(vice-versa) and all the data row can be seen from the bottom.


4

In my opinion, this is an obvious dark pattern - the site seeks the attention of its users and encourages them to spend more time on it. The generic term for this is "alert fatigue" and there are multiple industries that have done studies about it, e.g., healthcare, aviation, autonomous cars. A few starting points could be: "Never cry wolf", a chapter from ...


4

Do not "less emphasize" it unless it is a requirement! Do not jeopardise your users' experience in the favor of discouraging an action! These are two different buttons with two different functionalities that are EQUALLY important to the users. Apparently users should be able to Register and to Unregister. Similarly I am able to buy from Amazon and I am ...


4

Be explicit with actions, and use clear labels. It sounds like surfacing actions clearly is the main issue. You can use a 'Download' link dropdown at the end of the grid. And have the menu be clear in the formats and types of downloads available. Since you have 2 types of downloads, and two format choices for the first option, just display it clearly:


4

There is a certain scenario for which a dedicated button is needed. For video, especially, it sounds like a bad idea to dismiss the Lightbox on clicking somewhere on the overlay background. Because that may happen accidentally, and buffering the same video which just finished loading is terribly painful. This will not be the case for an image, assuming it is ...


4

If you need to be clear about choices, you can use the expose within radio button pattern. Lukew has a section on this in his old (but still relevant) book Web form design (pg 186) When the number of inputs is quite small–one to two additonal inputs–this method can maintain the context of a person's initial selection while introducing the required ...


4

I would allow setting a quantity 0 to remove an item because it is the obvious intent of having a quantity of 0. It seems that disallowing 0 could be an implementation issue where enforcing a minimum quantity could be easier than calling a deletion function for 0. It might also be a ploy to attempt to force customers to keep items in their carts for later ...


4

there is really no agreed general semantic term for this interface component. Shopify regards it as a Popover menu in their Polaris Design system. IBM regards to it as an Overflow menu in their Carbon Design system The Ant Design system refers to it as a Popover menu. Bootstrap refers to it as a Dropdown menu. I personally think it's an Enhanced Popover....


3

Users will understand that the multiple checkboxes within a group will be OR operators otherwise the selection of two options would always give no results. This means, that if some options are OR selections they would have to be in the same group. In your example the problem starts with the location and vehicle make. This two options are OR selections but ...


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