338

Infinite scroll has its uses, but a search result page is not one of them. Infinite scroll relies on discovery and exploration. This works well for when you're not looking for anything in particular; when you're sifting through a massive amount of data until you find something that hooks your interest. This format lends itself extremely well for social media ...


143

There is no official statement regarding this, so no one can give you a 100% accurate answer. One of the biggest reasons might be the ad placement of Google. They earn money with every search, and since they use pagination they can even earn money multiple times with only one search, try it yourself. For example if you search for "toaster" (in Germany), ...


107

Since no one posted it yet, to me the main reason against infinite scrolling is shown in this XKCD comic: The tool tip reads: Maybe we should give up on the whole idea of a 'back' button. 'Show me that thing I was looking at a moment ago' might just be too complicated an idea for the modern web. Here is the Explain XKCD page for the ...


94

Noscript Support In addition to the other answers above, infinite scroll is only possible with javascript enabled. If Google wants to appeal to the widest possible userbase for their main page, then it is beneficial for them to display search results to people who do not have javascript enabled. Infinite scroll has the added downside of hiding the ...


43

Both solutions have their pros and cons. Pagination Pro: Users can easily orient where they are and go back directly to the page they were before in cases like: browser restarts, swictching from device to device etc. ("John, I have found some interesting ads, gone through the first five pages of them, can you continue, darling?") Con: a lot of them will ...


23

I think of 2 possible solutions. First solution: The newly show entries are also selected. Since the user selected "SELECT ALL" it would be good to the program to... select all, since thats what the button calls. Second solution: Why not trying pages instead of "load more" like gmail form Google. Note: The "load more" and "select all" functions as ...


23

Pagination works better for several reasons: Because the resulting HTML isn't complete, some browsers display NOTHING, while others display what comes back. So, browser compatibility would be one reason. Because with pagination, Google can place sponsored ads at the top of each page; with infinite scrolling, that's more complicated to do Because with ...


13

The simplest way would be to let the user know that new content is available. These can be found in many different applications that dynamically load new content. For example say, the user has scrolled down a couple of times in an application with infinite scroll you can do something like this, For paginated applications, consider not updating content in ...


13

Google is already testing progressive load... Google loads content progressively on Google images, but they don't do that on web results. There are many reasons for this, as already mentioned in other answers, but the most likely reason is to provide control to users Think about this: I know I saw that interesting results on Page2 is way better than "I ...


10

I think the forum software discourse has a good solution for this. They are updating the url while you are scrolling down. If you goto to another page from the list and return using the back button, you are at the same position you have left the page. Try it yourself: http://try.discourse.org/ This blog article has more details of the reasoning behind ...


10

Google follows both models; pagination and progressive loading at the same time but for different pages. e.g. for images like here, you can see that there is progressive loading and after a certain moment, a CTA saying "Show more results" come which can show the other set of results but when you search in general like this then after a certain points, ...


9

I suggest you go with Infinite Scrolling because we see it ourselves everyday that the number of times we click on the page 2 of Google Search. When we don't find what we are looking for on page 1 - we simply change the search keyword. But that doesn't happen with Facebook, we just keep scrolling down and down and suddenly realize we are spending too much ...


9

Torture! I'm sorry not to answer your question directly, but I'm actually quite alarmed by the the whole idea... So your friend has decided to put high-school teenagers through the torture of having to answer 160 questions? Does he or she has any idea how cognitively demanding such a task may be? (PS, to get a faint feel for it - please go ahead to the ...


7

You are right, it's a natural thing to scroll down when you see a list with an arbitrary number of items. If 6 is not arbitrary, then make sure your users are not expecting more or less. On the other hand, there is no harm in scrolling up or down, the user quickly discovers that the entire list is on the screen and gets used to it. You can help that by ...


7

Let me just answer as a user of web pages. I don't have UX designer research to back me up, just this personal raw emotion and experience as an (admittedly maybe unusual) end user: The very thought of infinite scrolling invokes visceral rage as a first reaction for me [rage-rant omitted for brevity]. When I find that a page has infinite scrolling my ...


6

Visual cues can suggest there aren't more elements and that the complete "page" is visible and can't be scrolled. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The inner rectangle groups the 6 items, suggesting a singular group, a panel that fills the viewport. The space above the top item and below bottom item show that there isn't ...


6

Most of the people scroll-down because of a huge amount of websites and apps that are using it more and more. I would use some typography and i would add on some distance from the bottom. Maybe something like a footer. but i still think the average user is used to scroll "by default"


5

Questions I aks myself when choosing the right pagination solution: Will users be addressing a particular page? If no - then don't do numbers, just prev/next or infinite scroll. How often items will be published to the feed. If often, then if I give page number to somebody it will become not correct in an hour - he/she will not found the item on that page. ...


5

No. Most people aren't sure on this, because Neilsen's statement on the subject predates the wide-spread deployment and adoption of infinite scrolling: Yes, "return to top" can be avoided, because the exact same functionality is provided by simply dragging the scrollbar to the top of the page. It's almost always better to rely on a single, generic ...


5

The current mockup is pagination, just poorly implemented. Load More/Infinite Scrolling are applied to data sets that are essentially infinite (such as Facebook's News Feed, or an e-commerce site's product results). When there are a finite number of results, "Load More" is functionally the same as "Next Page", but it lacks the "Previous Page" and "...


4

Instead of displaying a "load more" button, you can easily just put a phrase that says something like "end" such as: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Obviously, wording can change, but as long as they know that there is nothing more to show. Heck, even not displaying a button anymore can be sufficient enough.


4

The common practice seems to be when scrolling down the feed nothing appears, but as soon as the user starts scrolling back up have a "Back to top" button appear at the top of the feed. It is that way for obvious reasons, when the user is scrolling down they don't want to go up, if they want to go all the way up they'll start scrolling up. Make sure to keep ...


4

Follow like what FB does, whenever there is new entries in the timeline, display a small indicator (button) that shows up saying "New Stories", when pressed it will take the user to the top of the page. Yes, in terms of continuity, the old entries still should be displayed below the new entries. This way, user will still have an image map in his/her mind.


4

Unless there are performance issues, let the user chose between pagination, infinite scroll, filtering and sorting of content. One way to think of it is letting the server decide what to deliver depending on load. At high traffic only 10 items will be delivered on each request delivered by Pagination/infinite scroll and allow for filtering. It would be sort ...


3

Since the infinitely scrollable page has no real world parallel, perhaps the function of the back button can exist without a real world metaphor. Imagine that you have been scrolling down an infinite page, pausing for some parts and zipping past others. Now imagine that you tap the back button. What is your intention? too jump back up to the most ...


3

I'm not sure the Jam study is appropriate for this response as the interface isn't about choice. The user knows presumably where they need to go they just need to find the door. I'd question first off the size of the buttons you've made which help contribute drastically to the problem. In this interface you must take care to present the most used elements ...


3

'Select All' should be stateless. It should not be implemented with a toggling behavior - i.e. on/off state. I cannot recall a single case where I saw it implemented this way. A good example case is Gmail, see how it works there. So, it should work on the items currently in the table and in this case you should also add an 'Deselect All' button.


3

You have just discovered that Load All and Select All don't work well together and now you are stuck as to how to make them work together. Every option you are looking at is further degrading the user experience. Your design is compromised so I recommend you reconsider your design. I have designed Enterprise applications for nearly 20 years and I have yet ...


3

Because of the issues you describe, I would not use "Select All" with an infinite scroll. Even if your decision about how it should behave is comfortable for you, I wouldn't expect users to have the right mental model about what will happen and what will be affected by "Select All." I'd use different technique. Edit: Other answers are giving good ...


2

Your example does not feature infinite scrolling in the same way it is discussed in the article you have linked to. Apart from the obvious difference (drag to navigate), the user can scroll up or down to zoom in or out the timeline: that gives the user a sense of where the current moment lies in the bigger story. A user can zoom out to see the entire ...


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