106

You might want to look into skeleton ui patterns or placehold patterns. They're very popular right now and are used by for example Facebook. I found a nice short article on medium that talks about it, but I'm sure you can find a lot on it around the web. To quote the writer: It seems like a good alternative to the loading state since it re-enforces the ...


52

Where was this first seen This practice dates back at least to the earliest days of image hyperlinks. For example, the Internet Archive's earliest snapshot of Yahoo's home page from October 1996 has a clickable Yahoo! logo. Why has it become an industry standard? 1. Convention Conventions are self-perpetuating. Given the ubiquity of this practice, users ...


51

The latter for sure. The users will experience a poor user experience with the former. What's interesting about this question is that it raises the notion of 'visibility of system state' or "as long as I know what's going on, I feel I am in control" and that's just what your loading bar will do. I suppose a more important question is where this status bar ...


50

It's become standard because everyone does it. Everyone does it because it's nice to have a 'home' link but it's not something that needs to clutter the menu, either. Hence the idea to just make the logo link to the home page. Not sure if anyone can answer where this was first seen. But I recall doing it close to 2 decades ago so I think its been around ...


45

User would normally expect going back to the home page. The solution to your problem can be a breadcrumb notion which would help user navigate back to the account dashboard instead of homepage. Find out more about breadcrumb here Here is a rough wire-frame for the concept explained above


34

Really you shouldn't put this application on your home page. The home page serves as the entry page to your site, and users will need quick access to navigation. I would consider even ~1s load time too long for that. If you still want to present the application on your front page, I would hide it behind a button where the user can consciously start loading ...


33

Looking through both the "Home button vs Logo link?" and "Should I add a 'Home' Button to the navigation?" questions on UX SE, the information in both is still quite relevant even though some of it is two years old or more. "Relevant" doesn't mean there's a clear-cut answer, and really there isn't going to be a clear-cut answer applicable to all. I don't ...


30

Imagine this for a second. The UX logo for this site disappears on the home page, but then appears again when you're on any other page other than the homepage. It wouldn't be a good experience. So, keep it, people are accustomed to the "home" button being there constantly. Especially if your homepage has dynamically generated content, because people use ...


27

I would expect the logo to redirect to the root of the website. Another way to look at the problem would be to "replace" the root of the website with the actual account-related content : see Twitter, for example. After you log in, the home page displays your customized timeline; to the user, it's basically a different website. Of course, that only works ...


20

It heavily depends on the site content and architecture. I believe it is very dangerous to try and make conclusions using statistics "on average" (moreover, I'm not sure such statistics even exist). In my experience no matter how well your site is indexed and how many good entry points there are, it is always better to have a home page than not to have one. ...


18

Some actual data that may help you make up your mind on this. In June 2011 the web consulting firm ProMediaCorp did a study of the top 500 websites (as defined by Alexa) and found that: Of the websites checked, 37.4% of them link to the homepage in their site navigation, while 62.6% do not. Now, just because the majority of major sites don't include it,...


17

Your best bet is to render the page formalities and structure in a second or two (ethernet time, cell-data time will vary). And then, backfill the data as the data comes up. Imagine if you reboot the starship Enterprise. There are dozens of displays. They don't all come up at the same time, they flit on, one at a time, depending on how long they take to ...


11

Document Hierarchy First, you have to understand that the Home Page originates from the concept of a document hierarchy. Where the top most document is referred to as the home, and all child documents in sub-categories are its descendants. To navigate from any given point in the hierarchy to the top was to return Home. Document Structure When Applicable A ...


10

It's not published anywhere, but when I was at university I had to do a small usability study. For the sites tested, I did observe significant attempts to return to the home page corresponding with user frustration, particularly in users with mental handicaps such as dyslexia -- often they would fail to notice that something was clickable where neurotypical ...


9

37Signals did an amazing job with Highrise. They've been testing the signup page using different designs and sharing the results. http://37signals.com/svn/posts/1525-writing-decisions-headline-tests-on-the-highrise-signup-page http://37signals.com/svn/posts/2977-behind-the-scenes-highrise-marketing-site-ab-testing-part-1 http://37signals.com/svn/posts/...


9

The home button should stay, for reasons already listed. But users find controls which are disabled confusing. One could argue that it's an example of inconsistent design. It would be more effective, and easier for users to understand, to create another enabled state for your home button, like Axure's Selected state or CSS3's active state. That would ...


8

I'm not sure about affective (did you mean "effective"?), but we can definitely identify a common, even standard, design pattern for one-product websites. Here are a few examples: Square, Doxie, Feedly, Highlight, Dollar Shave Club. As far as I understand, the main principles for one-product websites are: Product in front - These websites use big images ...


7

Even if your navigation is the most perfect one, you do need a homepage, because the homepage is the one that serves these cases: Users type the URL/domain name directly. Your loyal readers/clients may remember your domain and type it in directly, or find it in your business card and type it in. As a corollary: When a user types a simple word in the address ...


7

I've been working for years as web designer/developer in a communication company. From experience I can tell you that a well done smart video is better than anything to explain concepts in briefs and reaching the point. For your doubt: "I am uncomfortable with the expectation that users will play the video at all without an introduction or explanation of ...


7

I would suggest adding the two logos as a separate navigation and the "home button" to take you to the home of the Company page you are in. That way the user will identify that there are 2 different pages and each one has its unique navigation structure. i.e.


7

An A/B test experiment can help determine the answer since it can go either way depending on the type of users on your site and the type of 'conversion' you're referring to (purchased, view product detail, sign up for account..etc). My assumption is that adding the product category will encourage the users to click on category and view more related ...


7

You should offer both. For people who dont have patience to watch 60 sec long movie, will simply scroll the page down and look at screenshots with feature visualization. If that persons get interest in your project, they will take time to watch the movie to get the full explanation of you product. On the other side there are people who are typical TV ...


7

Why shouldn't clicking the logo reload the page? A link that does nothing seems like more of a UI problem than a link that reloads the same page. If a page has any time related content like feeds that do not auto-refresh, just like the question list pages on this site it would be very ill-advised not to refresh the page when the logo is clicked. Even when ...


7

Your layout is making users think WAY to much On the surface your layout follows a classic Z-pattern for the eye: Z-patterns are commonly used and can be effective. But to communicate a single message the layout has to follow a narrative. Here's where it starts to go wrong... (Follow along with the numbers in the screenshot above) The Z-pattern starts ...


7

The days of gaming search engines are behind us Build something people will want. Something with a good content to link ratio that shows you're actually giving something to the user. Linking to a blog under the same domain will earn you points for your work. Duplicating across pages will actually hurt you (depending on the algorithm du jour). Do not ...


7

The logo normally navigates (and is expected to) to the highest level of the websites hierarchy. Does the hierarchy of the account section depict the home page at the top or the account dashboard? In general, the user will expect this to take them to the home page - it may be worth adding a notification to say something along the lines of 'are you sure you ...


6

Take a look at Stack Overflow Careers. The main page clearly indicates it's for job seekers and there is a fairly prominent "for employers" link which takes you to the employers page. This is clear who the target audience is and again has a link back to the job seekers page. So - who are going to be the majority of your users? If there is a clear ...


6

The landing page of your site is a chance to grab people's attention with something that they are likely looking for. You are choosing to not grab their attention with anything, and when you don't demonstrate why staying is interesting, people will leave. As it stands now, your landing page amounts to a menu. I don't see anything that you are gaining by ...


6

According the opinion that carousels are evil and one should not use them, regardless of what the customer thinks, the conclusion is: "Longer is better". The ideal time is "infinity" (i.e. don't use carousel). If you are forced to use some finite time, then make is as longer as possible without getting fired.


6

This is a question I used to wonder myself a lot so glad to see it brought up! If you're promoting a product (e.g. an app) that's meant for achieving a specific goal, "Welcome to __" seems too generic a statement in setting clear user objectives a.k.a. "What am I spending my time on/What will I get out of this visit?" The common practice in this case is to ...


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