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13

There is little doubt that for most people a touch device has positive psychological effects. Watch a small child using a tablet vs a computer, or even better, watch an autistic person interact with a tablet. Watch their faces as it opens a new world to them, and you will be convinced. Touch screens allow people to interact more naturally with devices as ...


10

I guess they provide an intuitive interface when replacing something which is used by expert users, and is traditionally using dials. Examples would be audio boards, cockpits, other professional-only electrical devices. Meego Harmattan (the OS of Nokia N9) used it to set the time: Although it's great and provides a natural mapping (as it is recommended ...


8

Touch screens are really still at an early stage in the life and history of mobile devices, but touch (or haptic) feedback is at an even earlier stage of development (despite probably having been around for longer!), largely due to lack of funding, cost of prototyping and risk of non-widespread take up. Rachel Hinman (currently at Nokia) is a thought leader ...


7

The basic premise of the question lies in the fact that phones have changed (almost instantly) from the tactile monsters to touch beings and that brings about a drastic shift in how people interact with them and they suddenly require more attention (idea very nicely put in the question). Phones used to be our usual machines with tactile feedback at the ...


5

I think that the study "The Value of Haptics: A summary of published findings on the value of haptic feedback in human-computer interaction" provides interesting information about this subjects. On page 6 you can find a list of contexts where haptic stimulation is ideal for communication: Private information: haptic feedback is silent, non-visual, ...


4

There are several reasons (some are posted here but I'll sum them up anyways :) ) They can be made to scroll to infinity without requiring an extended space or a graphical visualisation that needs to alter its appereance during use (for example - infinity scroll bars that decrease the handle size). It's a really fast way of using a small area to scroll ...


3

Haptic feedback is provided to inform users that an interaction is taking place. To quote this research article about Haptic feedback on Keyboards Consumers evaluating a standard Android keyboard say they prefer options that employ HD haptic effects compared to the non-haptics and standard haptics alternatives: With HD haptics, a virtual keypad feels ...


3

What makes physical knobs so good? The core attributes of a physical knob are resistance and inertia. Inertia smoothes the "user input", supressing smaller shaking, allows fine-tuning at low speeds and easy turning at high speeds. Resistance adjusts the force required to something comfortable to humans, avoiding accidental changes, providing tactile ...


2

Aadaam talks about the iPod, which for a long time used a physical 'dial' and later a touch 'dial'. Not quite a knob, and not quite purely software, but an interesting use of it. I do think that a knob is a difficult virtual control given that it doesn't easily map to the hardware input device. Even on a touch device, it's a bit difficult as you have to ...


2

This psych effect is true, I have observed it… on me. I am reticent to having a touch screen phone, especially because my ear would touch it — the problems Apple had with its first iPhones prove me right. Sometimes, albeit rarely, my iPad clicks “on her own”. So now I am more careful — and more nervous — with my iPad. I hold it with keeping my fingers far ...


2

Starting with 'Direct Manipulation' a term coined in the 1980s by Shneiderman and then later redefined to be more appropriate for 'UX', states that DM's intention is to Allow a user to directly manipulate objects presented to them, using actions that correspond at least loosely to the physical world. This is made quite literal by the touch interfaces. ...


2

Haptic feedback is a very useful way of letting the user know they have successfully performed an action. For example, it's a simple way to let the user know they clicked a button instead of having to wait for something to happen to know it was clicked. But haptic feed is not something you'd want to use wherever you can. While there are users who don't ...


1

As you comment in the question haptics in touch devices can be used for: feedback on an interaction: confirms an interaction took place (this might possibly be helpful due to the lack of non-visual feedback between the finger and what is behind the screen) particular way of calling the user attention to transmit some message The usage you propose belongs ...


1

Well, other people already said it although in a very simple way, so here it goes again (credits to them): what you're looking for is called Haptic Feedback, which is one of the components of a Haptic Interface A haptics interface is a system that allows a human to interact with a computer through bodily sensations and movements. Haptics refers to a ...


1

You can go for haptic feedback. Provided the user has enabled haptic feedback in settings.


1

One personal reason I don't like haptic feedback is that it is noisy. Watch someone type out a message/text with haptic feedback sometime - the noise catches your attention even if you're not the only one typing. Another personal reason is because it eats up my battery time. I found this article really interesting: http://m.pocketnow.com/2013/07/16/why-i-...


1

When people discuss haptic feedback (in relation to smart watches) like it's a new thing they are mainly talking about the feedback when people are actively touching the surface of the screen i.e when performing actions. In this instance I can't imagine there is a use to provide feedback whilst touching the screen that you have a message as if you are ...


1

I would use the haptic feedback when I would like to notify the user that he made an important action (can be negative or positive). Like deleting something important or adding something important to a list or so.


1

I think it's indisputable that something is lost in eliminating tactile feedback completely; the market for tactile control surfaces for music-making and games testifies to this. When you use an on-screen keyboard or control pad, you're constantly expending a certain amount of cognitive effort to control the position of your hands, which would be reduced or ...


1

Virtual dials are missing the "graspable" affordance that makes them effective. So in the virtual realm the area users interact with in the physical realm (the sides) is missing and replaced with an area that they don't use (the top) and whose surface area is small in comparison. This breaks the metaphor completely. One area they are ubiquitous is music ...


1

When you want to enable endless cyclic turning e.g. to control the angle of something. In this case adding a dent e.g. this search result + a numeric value at the side to make the current angle clear is important. If you want to limit the angle of the dial, you can draw a dial with a position indicator that sticks out and use a track around the dial with ...


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