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I guess a stroke/color code will be useful:


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Welcome! To move quickly, efficiently and cost-effectively, one approach might be to use Google Material Design as a guide to answering questions on how components should look and work (example: "Should our primary action button be on the right?") and a framework like Bootstrap or React to create components for a design library. You might well find that you ...


3

There was a research done on that a couple of years ago. Have a look here: https://think.storage.googleapis.com/docs/mobile-page-speed-new-industry-benchmarks.pdf One of the first things they mention is: The average time it takes to fully load a mobile landing page is 22 seconds, according to a new analysis. Yet 53% of mobile site visitors leave a ...


3

It really depends on the business requirements, budget, and resources. You started by saying it is a small company. Building a framework is a lifelong a project itself. You do not build it once and done. It needs to be maintained and updated as technology evolves. On the other hand, using an existing Framework and libraries does not mean you will not have a ...


2

Although I create HTML/CSS prototypes for testing purposes, I do not ask the Dev team to recycle that code mainly because they have their own standards in terms of naming conventions and code maintenance. Sketch, Invision or Adobe XD are based on contemporary CSS properties, meaning mockups created with these tools should be easy to convert to CSS. For ...


2

Good wireframing tools like Axure or Figma give you the option to export HTML/CSS code. (Seemingly Sketch too, but I haven't used it) Of course it's still work and you can't just simply copy paste it, but it's significantly less work than your current way. Your devs can find the needed properties quickly and precisely, instead of having to guess or extract ...


2

Green-Yellow-Red I would advocate for a colour scheme with some inherent relationship between quality levels. Ideally, you can leverage existing heuristics around how desirable a road is. For example Green: High quality Yellow: Medium quality Orange: Low quality (but usable) Red/Red-Yellow Dashes: Unusable, but soon good Red: Unusable (closed) Google ...


2

The NNG website summarizes response times and need for feedback: Response Times: The 3 Important Limits In summary, 0.1 seconds for the UI to feel instantaneous. From 0.1 to 1.0 seconds the UI will have a noticable delay. After 1.0 seconds the user will feel their work is being interrupted. This is independent of the technology used for the user ...


2

I wholeheartedly agree with Michael Lai's comment: while there might be great tools that you could experiment with, it's at least as important to review your processes and team composition. Alas, I doubt that this is an endeavor that could be tackled in a discussion thread here… P.S.: Since there are some tool suggestions in this thread already, I'll add ...


2

Having multiple search buttons is confusing, my suggestion would be to have the search button always be at the bottom of the view and have the filter items scroll. Example: The yelp iOS app search filter screen


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Yes, today there are hundreds of studies on the prevention of confusion following the use of virtual or augmented reality. My favorite is "adding a virtual nose" to a virtual reality simulator. apparently, adding a steady nose helps to maintain the gap between your eyes and your vestibular system (in your ears). https://www.wired.com/2015/04/reduce-vr-...


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Definitely, don't go with two search buttons. Very confusing for the user. Which search should I press will be what they think? Use a single search button and make it fixed to the bottom of the screen. Also "Looking for" as a placeholder and title are confusing... Looking for what, jobs, pay rise, part-time work? If this is job titles the placeholder should ...


1

I would suggest having one save button at the end of all filter options. It would avoid unnecessary confusion for a user. Also, it demands extra space which makes the list much longer. If the lists are more than 2 scrolls, consider grouping few of them & make it expandable. Users feel a bit uncomfortable to scroll more than 3 times. Unless it's ...


1

I think it’s a bit confusing. People may think, “Are the search buttons only for those particular filter sections?” Not that it matters. What if you broke out the true search pieces: location and looking for, and use the search icon, then have your filter section in a new “card” or area and use an “Apply” button?


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A little bit of column A and a little bit of column B. Standards are difficult to change especially when you have to work with multiple companies and browsers. With every change, you have to ensure browser compatibility for all available versions for all available browsers, you have to consider accessibility, touch behaviour etc. As technology advances (...


1

Apart from Figma, Sketch and Axure, I would also recommend the two following (equivalent) tools: Avocode: it can be integrated with almost any design software and gives more detailed handoff compared to the design softwares alone. Plus it has a commenting feature and design versioning. I was able to introduce it in my team (they used photoshop only for ...


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Consider the three different elements involved in collaborating with another team: Process - is there a well defined process that allows you to understand how each deliverable is produced and therefore you can work out the logic in an unambiguous manner? Communication - are there well established communication channels that allow you to provide feedback and ...


1

Seems like you need a tool like UXPin or Axure where you can create interactions and generate code for handing off to the developers. What do you mean by "create a basic front end"? Do you mean the UI and design team creates a UI framework and library which the developers can use? I think a commercial tool would be helpful in bridging the gap between design ...


1

Something that has helped my process a lot is to bring the developers in earlier - discuss constraints upfront, or if there are no constraints, expectations, and have them give feedback on the designs. Iterative processes are ideal, and have allowed us to test out designs (or portions of designs) at every opportunity.


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I assume this applies to people who were born deaf or lost their hearing at a very young age. The consequence of this is that they grow up with sign language as their native language. This doesn't mean that they can't grasp complex concepts, but sign language is not the signed equivalent of the spoken language used around Deaf people. Consequently, the ...


1

If you work in software intelligence, you should know Palantir's Blueprint. Personally I find it more appealing than Material.


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I've learned that you can not automatically save time by going one way or the other. There will still be the need to customize layouts and create new elements, and working new elements into an existing design system can take just as long as creating one from scratch. It really depends on your team's experiences [i.e. the designer(s) and developer(s)] and ...


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Use Accordion, which is specially for user control how much contents he want or need to see. Image source - this blog


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This is an incredibly interesting field of discussion, from bots being unfeeling to being "too human." There's a recent Botsociety blog post from a UX designer Jen Spatz approaching this problem--she mentions how GUIs and VUIs are best-served when they are practical and info-based, rather than skeuomorphic (life-like). https://botsociety.io/blog/2019/04/...


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English is full of examples of writers who think they should capitalize Every Word that they think is Special. It's an archaic style and it looks officious and a bit silly. Most modern style guides generally reserve capitalization for proper nouns, formal titles that are in apposition to people's names and the titles of cultural works or statutes. Sometimes ...


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