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82

The Microsoft's Guidelines for Keyboard User Interface Design says: Use the following guidelines for designing shortcut keys: Assign simple and consistent key combinations. Make shortcut keys customizable. Use a shortcut with the CTRL key for actions that represent a large-scale effect, such as CTRL+S for save current document. Use the ...


41

This is a good approach, however I would recommend putting the ellipses in the middle of the shortened string rather than at the end. It is commonly the last portion of the URL that distinguishes it from others, so by putting the ellipses in the middle you are not truncating the useful part of the URL. Example: www.thisisalongdomain.com/section/category/...


40

Arrows have been an indicator of direction for so long that it's hard to say for sure, but my guess would be that an arrow fired from a bow only has one direction it can go, lending ease of communication when direction is needed. And since bow & arrows have been around long enough, and in practically every culture it has basically become universal. ...


38

Is the arrow symbol truly universal? The United States launched two spacecraft in 1972 and 1973 with a message for any alien species that might encounter them. The message was specifically designed to be universally interpretable. It built up it's own number system from scratch using the fundamental properties of the Hydrogen atom. The goal was to ...


30

The UI guidelines are a great start - but are also just that - guidelines. You need to do your research as well. Standards: Research what are accepted standards. e.g. Ctrl+S for Save. Familiarity: Research what is being done in similar, competitor, or otherwise comparable applications that your target audience is using. Multitasking: Research what is being ...


29

Just to offer an alternative hypothesis, the fact that the basic shape is two lines converging on a single point, might have something to do with perspective: In this case the sense of direction is created by our very own direction. There may not have been very many highways in paleolithic Africa, but the plains may well have had some similar features. At ...


28

You should allways follow the style guide of the platform you're targeting. That way it'll be much easier for your users to understand how the app works. If you do the opposite you'll end up with unnecessary cognitive load on your Android users trying to figure out how your iOS-like app works.


28

Put on a song that you know, and have someone hit pause and play at random times, then have them randomly turn the volume up and down. Lowering the volume, rather than pausing the music, is less disruptive to the user. Your brain can fill in the gaps in music they are listening to if they are even somewhat familiar with it (it's why people can listen to ...


27

Please do make the cancel option a link rather than a button. It makes it so incredibly simple to see which button I should click. Look at this AgileZen login, it's obvious which option is the default:


27

I prefer 'Sentence case' over 'Title Case' because sentence case respects the difference between proper nouns and the other words. I always thought that it was customary in English. In Spanish it is not, we use sentence case, like this traditional argentine newspaper does. This traditional USA newspaper uses Title Case instead. These are language differences....


26

Yes. English text is usually left-aligned. Numbers are normally aligned so that the various places (unit, tens, etc.) are in columns. If the numbers are integers, this just means right-aligning the numbers. If they have decimal fractions, then the decimal places should be aligned, with the units digits all in a vertical line. This makes it easy to compare ...


24

In this situation, I would not use a drop down until you need to. Using a drop down with one option will be annoying to some degree because people will click on it and expect more choices but not find any. Also, people will be trained to not click on that drop down because its 'useless'. You'll have to somehow retrain them to look for the new options if/...


23

The guidelines for Windows 8 desktop applications are the same as for Windows 7. That means that you'll find them here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dn688964.aspx Windows 8 has two separate UIs: Windows Store apps (formerly known as "Metro-style apps") and Desktop. Windows Store apps is the new, future oriented touch UI. ...


19

Visibility of system status - The user should always understand what is happening right now. Where is she in the system (e.g highlight the right tab in the navigation menu)? What is the system doing (e.g loading animation when a page loads)? If there's an error - what's wrong (e.g "wrong password" message under the password field, if the user entered a wrong ...


19

I know there's an accepted answer, and I usually do quite agree with Michael, but still this does bug my mind for two days. As a developer, I hated the Apple HIG It just didn't tell me what to do, how to do things in practice. The Windows Guideline was felt as "empty", but it could be that it did because it seemed, on Windows, actually noone follows them. ...


19

That really depends on the users and on what they are typing. Typing on a physical keyboard is significantly faster than on a touch device. So the question then is what the average WPM typing speed of the average user on your system is, and then work backwards from there. Let's say that it is 25 WPM. Typically a word is considered 5 characters long, so ...


18

Yes, this is a "standard". I am >25 too and I know where to look up this guideline :-) This is guideline 2.3/16 in: Smith S. L., Mosier J. N. (1986) Guidelines for Designing User Interface Software (ESD-TR-86-278), Bedford: The MITRE Corporation | http://www.idemployee.id.tue.nl/g.w.m.rauterberg/lecturenotes/DA308/MITRE(1986)smith-mosier.pdf Authors ...


18

It's a heated topic to be sure, but the best insight comes from understanding the usage and intent of a user clicking a link and specifically how this relates to the work at hand and what is going on in the user's mind (i.e. what they are trying to achieve by clicking the link and how that relates to their workflow). In general, if a link results in leaving ...


18

If you have the resources, you should follow the guidelines for whichever platform the app is on. In the past many companies considered iOS to be 'the market' and only made Android apps as an afterthought. As a result, they often simply built an iOS app in Android to save them time and cost. This wasn't done because it was a better way of doing it, just a ...


18

Why don't you try something like this. Once the user clicks on the item to drag just highlight the valid and invalid sections like above. I would suggest you do it as soon as user clicks (before starting to drag), this will actually a pre cursor for the user, where to drop the item. In the approach mentioned by you, the user will actually drop the item and ...


17

Apple iPhone & iPad (iOS) User Experience Guidelines iPhone & iPad (iOS) User Interface Guidelines Mac OS X User Experience Guidelines Mac OS X User Interface Guidelines Google Android User Interface Guidelines Design Principles Google TV Web Site Optimization Resources Website Design & Content Guidelines BlackBerry Blackberry Browser ...


17

Example Style Guides For example style guides applicable to applications, you can leaf through with the usual platform style guides (e.g., Windows, Apple, Gnome) for the organization, issues, and topics you may want to have. Many topics in these guides are not relevant to form-oriented UIs, but most of the guidelines for controls, messages, and dialog boxes ...


16

My approach to this is completely style-guide oriented. The online University of Oxford Style Guide states: The general rule is not to use a capital letter unless it is absolutely required. The Oxford Guide to Style states: Capitalize the first letter of headings and captions. So it appears Sentence Case is the way to go, event for captions.


16

The very page you link to says: This doesn't mean you should use an ellipsis whenever an action displays another window—only when additional information is required to perform the action. For example, the commands About, Advanced, Help, Options, Properties, and Settings must display another window when clicked, but don't require additional ...


16

I would trim in the middle, because in most situations the start (domain name) and end (page) of a link are the most interesting parts. Compare, for example: http://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/40326/best-way-to-handle-l... ...exchange.com/questions/40326/best-way-to-handle-long-links/40328 http://ux.stackexchange.com/q...best-way-to-handle-long-links/...


16

Regardless of the mix of types of data in one table, the data type in the individual column should drive the alignment. Typical alignments (and of course, there are always reasons and ways to do differently) Text and items treated like text: Left Align (caveat: I find numbers always easiest to read rt aligned) Numbers and items treated like numbers: Right ...


15

The only time you should use a dropdown where there is only one available option is: to stay consistent with pages that have many options for the same selection. For example: You are shopping for a new pair of shoes and are currently looking at a style that has sizes 5-14 available. These sizes are displayed in a dropdown. You click on a different style ...


13

Here are some that came across my mind: The best practice ever is not letting your system freeze at all. Consider better, more efficient serverside. Of course this cannot be done in some situations, but is a good thing to check at the beginning, because no matter how you tell the user the system is busy, it's always better to show that it just works. If you ...


13

There is some interesting academic work surrounding ethics and user experience, even though I have not come across a formal/industry "code of ethics" for UX practitioners specifically. There are books that touch on the "dark patterns" of experience design, and you will see some related questions here on UX.SE to that effect. One of the more recent academic ...


12

One idea: when the dragging starts, gray out the box and then if the user does drag over that region, make sure the mouse cursor indicates (red circle with a cross?) that region can't be dropped on. And extending that idea further: when the dragging starts use a red or gray to indicate it can't be dropped on, but also maybe use a green or some other ...


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