36

It depends directly on the language and if the diacritic produces a new letter or simply a variation of the same letter. In French (or Italian, Catalan, Portuguese...), accented characters (such as À, É, Ê, Ô, Ö, etc.) doesn't produce a new letter, they are only variation of the same letter. As such, one would expect words starting with an accented ...


12

A map with the title "Where are you", and when user selects a zone update a text with current time (to verify) "In your place it is 08:15 AM".


5

As a German, I know of two ways how this is handled. Either, "ö" is treated as "o" (e.g., in an encyclopedia) or it is treated as "oe" (e.g., in a phone book). "ß" is always treated as "ss". Even the German ISO (DIN) knows these two variants: DIN 5007 Variants 1 and 2 On the software side, database like MySQL have different collations. There is no ...


4

I don't know the actual reason, you'd have to ask someone on the dev team there but here's my understanding. Using right arrows to show a closed menu and a down arrow to show an expanded menu is a visiblity of system status indicator. It indicates that a group is either open or closed. The android arrows on the other hand, are not meant to show the ...


4

The same way physical directories do: A Andrew Bloggs Amy Johnson B Bob Marley Billy Bob Page break B (continued) Brian McGee


4

The proposed solution with a link symbol in your diagram may give a false impression that these items are chained together sequentially. Since a link is usually a 1 to 1 connection. To de-emphasize the possibility of naming groups, maybe provide an alternate way of grouping items? Some ideas: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


4

For a danish site we faced the same issue, and we grouped them as separate characters to avoid the confusion. The grouping needs to be understandable for the users.


4

The rule is that you should put names into categories, and sort them, in such a way that your users will find them where they expect them. You follow the rules of the user's language. For example, if you have a Swedish name like Ångström, and your users are British, you sort it under the letter A because that's where British users would look for it. If your ...


3

A technique used in lexicas with several books is to list the letter(s) of the first and last entry of a single book. In your case, that would translate to pages, not books, with a limited number of entries. Translated to your name list, this could look like: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Imagine more buttons for l-t,...


3

After thinking about this for some time, I thought panel. Besides "bunch of speakers", a panel generally means a collection of buttons and widgets you can interact with to control things. Microsoft hijacked the term control panel to mean System settings widgets, but a control panel is precisely this.


3

This would be a menu. The image would specifically be a an Options Menu. From there it get's less specific and more descriptive. You could call it a Modal Options Menu or a SlideUp Menu for something that incorporates a description of the accompanied animation. As far as I know, there is no standardized word or label.


3

Using color to tie similar objects together is better than nothing but can fail to get the job done for colorblind users. If you can change the order of the notes consider explicitly tying the groups together as follows...


3

I've been trying out different fitness apps over the last week or so, and have come across this issue on a lot of them. The very worst offenders are the ones that don't allow you to switch unit types altogether. Some things I'm noticing with your layout: 1) The header for 'Preferred unit of measure' appears to be the header for the entire screen, and thus ...


3

Seeing your current mockup, I thought immediately of the Windows 10 Start menu and the way it lets users easily group and resize tiles without needing a bevvy of dialogs and prompts. You could create a similar experience ... ... automatically add all wishlist items into a catchall group at the end ... tiles could be dragged around between groups ... ...


3

How about something like this? This conveys that the options are in-between, and the different color gives a visual cue.


3

I had to do this for an app and we ended up going with a multi line textarea (with a fixed width font) for several reasons and it worked really well. It made copy/pasting from anywhere else super easy in one shot (eg from a text editor or excel) By naturally breaking each entry by the line breaks they visually sort vertically By its nature this was a ...


2

The most user friendly approach would be to determine the users time zone for them. One less field for a potential user to fill out. Take a look at this project: https://bitbucket.org/pellepim/jstimezonedetect It uses JavaScript to determine the machines time zone. It provides an identifier like 'America/New_York'. When a user creates an account, get ...


2

You're right, the standalone IDs doesn't sit well in this instance, partly perhaps because it sounds like it's impressing the system model naming onto the user model, and partly because it looks a bit short, awkward and lonely. Developers are used to IDs for this that and the other, but in the interface that is exposed to the user, the terminology should be ...


2

Revisited this question again and I think Google has done a pretty good job. Timezone is first narrowed down by country. https://support.google.com/calendar/answer/37064?hl=en


2

I would try and avoid pagination by using infinite scroll. If the list could be fairly long I would use clickable / tapable index on the right to maki it simpler to get to the item of interest. A good search bar will help with very long lists. Contacts on an iOS or Android device handle this well, and their concepts can be used on pc interfaces as well.


2

Welcome to the world of Information Architecture, where everything can be classified in more than one way. The reason is that anything (or shall I write - any thing) has more than one property, or in the IA jargon - a facet. Even God can be Christian or Muslim, omnipresent or monopresent, religious or scientific. While it is hard to give a definite answer ...


2

Providing different routes to content is a common challenge made more complex in global organisations where local, regional and global content all compete for attention. This article discusses how to surface the content people actually need. Your links page is clearly useful to people, so find out what they struggle with and work on improving it. ...


2

Grouping items might not be the solution here. Instead allow the user to filter and show only the group he/she wants. Your third idea could be fine but I would add the possibility to search for a group. If browsing and grouping is the way to go, I think that the way the iPhone handles large lists with grouped items is a good one to consider. The category ...


2

Outlook does this reasonably well by right clicking on a column header and selecting group-by. This doesn't work so well on the Web especially with touch interfaces - though touch and hold is becoming more common. A tree icon by each column heading would work but would be a bit fiddly especially on small screens. A mobile style menu icon (small square with ...


2

I ended up asking the dev to build a multi-select typeahead. We put in icons to depict the different level in the hierarchy. If the group is selected, the associated icon is shown so the user knows the group is selected.


2

Take a look at Chosen It allows you to group within a selection, and select more than one employee from the same or different groups. I don't see built in support to select all from a single group with one click, but that could likely be worked in.


2

Alternative proposition : Add a search input, make your list infinite scrolling, use some tabs to classify the items if you can and it make sense and avoid pagination. Here a nice example : The more you scroll the more members are displayed


2

I would rethink the approach, instead of creating Groups, why don't you base everything in relations, that way it's scalable, also because I'm assuming this is about a same system so at the end of the day everything is related. I would also avoid using long numeric ids and would include who is posting the note. Here's a quick mockup:


2

As myself and others have mentioned recently, a good way to intuitively represent and modify percentages is a vertical bar chart with sliders/handles: With (editable) numbers for each part. By default I'd set them to have equally large portions, so for group A, 20%, group B is a full 100% for one resource, and C is 50/50.


2

Categorizing properly is tricky - it is a necessity to think from a user's perspective, and the categorization is always going to be a best guess. The trick of HCI is often about accommodating most of the people, rather than trying to get it right for all people. Your example list has good and worse solutions that illustrate this point: Good: Search Bar ...


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