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24

I think it is a great idea to use right click to context menu. It is a norm in desktop application and I see no reason for it not to be the case in web interfaces. And many if not all tools from Google and Microsoft now use right click actions to offer content related actions. And right click can be nicely replaced with long tap on touch-enabled devices, ...


13

It would be good UX for a general UI, but it is bad UX on the web. Your custom right click menu will block the regular one, what is against the principle of least surprise and possibly against what the user wants to do. Maybe he likes to use the browser's context menu, e.g. for copy, select all or even some more advanced options of current browsers, like ...


5

I've actually tried to right click on some cells to see if I could add more rows or columns (and sometimes it doesn't happen at all and I have to look for another tool). So, from my experience/opinion as a user, it's a good idea I would like to see more often. From a UX designer perspective I would tell you to test it in some way, asking the user which ...


5

This post I will answer like a web user. I have a confession: I'm always trying to use right-click on the web tools (web applications that work like a tool, like Google Drive) and nobody care with this. Rarely I saw someone using it. Otherwise, I will feel strange, maybe unhappy, if you do it on a website or e-commerce. Congratulations for your idea. ...


3

Try outlining the rows with an indicator which describes the specific formatting error. Provide a link with further explanation if needed. One thing you can do is to provide specific invalid formatting hints at the row level, by a means of a tooltip/icon, or even a pseudo row you create underneath that explains the exact error (and how to recover or fix it ...


2

Sorry for posting this as an answer, I am not sure if this is actually an answer. But I can't comment yet, anyway. I see two different problems here. First, whether the ascending order should be represented by a triangle pointing up or down (or similar icons). Second, whether this icon represents the current (now) or the future state (after click). As for ...


2

Changes involve frustration because users would have to repeat the learning process. Designing a more modern solution (without so much dialogue screen) Including interface operation via the keyboard If the company has the option, then maybe quantitative research might be useful? Is interaction required in each of the 7 columns? (e.g. Discount is not ...


2

That's fine. See image below. Words always work (I also rearranged your metadata into something that seemed more readable - and aligned with the delete icon). Checkmark placement is fine. To "offset" the border a little, and make it more perceptible to the eye, you could add a small inner border of white or the background grey (see image). You'll never find ...


2

Do you have a default selection when navigating to this grid/list/table? This action seems to be predicated by the user selecting multiple rows, so I don't know how much value applying a new, default selection would bring. If you have a default row (such as the first) when opening/navigating here, as a user that same consistency after deletion could be ...


1

The most adequate option is the first visible row. When you are deleting several non consecutive rows, the user focus will be lost anyways, so focusing the first visible row will give a known point of reference. Any other option will focus a row at a random position, as you don't know where will be the focused row after the deletions (the other rows will ...


1

Some of our apps have a "hover the row to see the applicable icons" and other apps have a "all icons are visible because the user typically needs to know all of the info they represent" I'd say your choice is going to come down to striving for no-visual-clutter vs really needing to know what info the icon conveys beyond what action it ...


1

I would say, if it works for your users, then stick with it. Option 1: icons everywhere More clear that all rows can be changed. Introduces a lot of redundance and visual clutter. Option 2: icons only on selected row Not entirely clear that each row can be changed. Visually less redundant.


1

It's a good thought and function of showing meta data on hover when you are dealing with photos. My observations on understaing the flow of your requirement, Since meta data is shown on hover, there is no need of close icon to close the meta data display, user has to just take a cursor away. taking into account of displaying the select feature and showing ...


1

This is a page architecture problem -- the answers can be found by asking, "What does each item on the page belong to?" The filter section belongs to the results section, not to the larger page. Thus it should line up with the results, and not extend into content areas below it. The top elements, like the breadcrumb, belong to the larger page and don't ...


1

Anything that is not alphabetical order will make the user think about what the order is. If you order by new employee how long will it take for them to learn what the order is ?


1

Changing how apps function is usually a UX nightmare. The older the app, the worse it gets. Age is the defining factor of this issue and your sounds very old. This change could be a truly deep negative experience for a major portion of your users. If you have users that don't use computers elsewhere, this could be a life changer for them because it's their ...


1

Here are some thoughts, with the caveat that I don't really know who your customers are or how they're going to use this shortcut system. -- People are used to screens being populated with icons, think desktops, or app browsing on iOS/Android, I think this is fine. If you're designing this to be responsive, then I suspect you're going to end up using ...


1

Right-click context menus have very bad discoverability, hence they should not be used as the only means of getting to functionality. They are meant for shortcuts, so as long as you keep the buttons on top, yes, this is exactly what they are for and it's good to offer that shortcut. I do think that 'allo' makes a good point about on web it's blocking the ...


1

No, it's not bad UX, but it's risky and requires additional concerns What happens if the user's right button doesn't work? a trivial task becomes impossible What happens with touch screens? However, I think there are undeniable benefits in your approach, so I think you can do it, just keeping a way to make this context menu or its related actions work even ...


1

If we take a look at Material Design. They split their layout up into different UI Regions. These include side navigation, content areas and app bars. These regions can display actions, content or navigation destinations. Permanent UI regions are regions that can be displayed outside of the responsive grid, like a navigation drawer. These regions cannot be ...


1

I don't find any reason to align "Yes/ No" to right or center just because are booleans. The numbers are right-aligned to help the reader make easier comparisons of magnitude when scanning down columns. If this column is important, you can use tags for yes/ no to highlight the info, with different background and the text-centered.


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