16 votes

'OK' or 'Ok' on UI?

Stick with is most common and time-proven. OK (with caps) has been used always. You can see its wikipedia page, is written using both caps.
IAmJulianAcosta's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

Should labels in forms follow the same grammar rules as titles

This is from Microsoft Title Caps: Capitalize the first letter of the first and last words. Capitalize the first letter of all words in between, with the exception of articles (a, an, and the); ...
Dipak's user avatar
  • 16.2k
12 votes
Accepted

To hyphenate or not to hyphenate: Grammatically correct or aesthetically pleasing text?

The Associated Press Stylebook, commonly adopted by publications and marketing departments, used to require hyphens between compound adjectives but changed its guidelines in 2019: We updated our ...
Anita CT's user avatar
  • 146
7 votes

'OK' or 'Ok' on UI?

If you have space in your UI, maybe consider using a more indicative label like: 'Delete my stuff' 'Sign me up' 'Show me the report' or the name of the page it takes you to.
kelbyuk's user avatar
  • 81
5 votes

Should I capitalize button text when quoting it?

If you feel the need to explain your UI, there might be something wrong with it. The classic joke applies here - A UI is like a joke. If you have to explain it, it isn’t very good. People ...
dennislees's user avatar
  • 11.6k
4 votes
Accepted

Text in UI readability vs. grammar – separate long words using hyphens

Microsoft's German style guide on the subject of Compounds: The Microsoft standard is that compounds of three components or less are written in one word, unless there are definite problems with ...
Roger Attrill's user avatar
2 votes

'OK' or 'Ok' on UI?

OK is the more common one according to ngrams. It's also worth thinking about how the appearance would affect someone reading aloud. OK is recognisable and forces a break between the letters ("oh ...
Karl Brown's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Append truncated text with "Read more" or "Show more" (or other?)

Both "Read More" and "Show More" are pretty clear to mean clicking on them would reveal more text. Adding an ellipsis (...) when the text becomes truncated would also clearly indicate the ...
Cynthia's user avatar
  • 146
2 votes

Labels - "list of ingredients" or "ingredients list"

When it comes to basic human factors questions like this, I reach for the US Department of Defense Design Criteria Standard for Human Engineering, known to its friends as MIL-STD 1472. It includes the ...
Michael Zuschlag's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Error/ success messages: File not downloaded or File was not downloaded. The download was stopped or interrupted by another file download

Generally, the "Problem stated" part of your message should be displayed as a section heading, with explanatory text below in a paragraph. This structure appears in the Material HIG examples: The ...
Tin Man's user avatar
  • 2,805
2 votes

Text in UI readability vs. grammar – separate long words using hyphens

The rules for the hyphen or Bindestrich on Duden.de explicitly allow the use of the hyphen for the purpose of clarification (my translation): Using a hyphen to highlight individual components in a ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 778
2 votes

Less vs. Fewer for validation message?

Linguistically, all these should be fewer because 10 is a countable amount. You can count the amount of charactera because it's a specific amount. Contrast this with "less text"; text isn't easy to ...
PixelSnader's user avatar
  • 8,331
1 vote
Accepted

Should I add period after yes/no answer in survey?

I would address this as a bulleted list. The Plain English grammar wonks have clear guidelines on punctuating the bulleted lists. According to them, your form qualifies as "a list of very short ...
An Lev's user avatar
  • 171
1 vote

Error/ success messages: File not downloaded or File was not downloaded. The download was stopped or interrupted by another file download

Display two-sentence messages in two sizes.
Garik's user avatar
  • 1,994
1 vote

Which is the proper grammatical structure of page titles?

Your instinct for consistency is good... Some other things to take into account in nomenclature: Is your audience the "home user" or admin types - will they appreciate, or be distracted by, a "...
Sean Singer Bentley's user avatar
1 vote

Which is the proper grammatical structure of page titles?

Without more information, it's difficult to say what labels are most appropriate. Often, the most accurate or descriptive term won't be the best label, because of what users are accustomed to. I ...
S. G. A.'s user avatar
  • 152
1 vote

Should labels in forms follow the same grammar rules as titles

When considering capitalization, people like to focus on grammar (which is important), but they should also consider voice and tone, readability, and practicality. There's lots of articles out there ...
Jess's user avatar
  • 318
1 vote

Synonym for “Read” (past tense)

This depends on how you are using the word Read. There can be various use-cases. In terms of reading a book, reading messages. For reading content that's abundant like books, novels, etc: I like ...
Swapnil Borkar's user avatar
1 vote

'OK' or 'Ok' on UI?

There's also the pedantic answer to consider. All dictionaries I am aware of list OK as the correct spelling for the word, never Ok. (In fact, the StackExchange spelling checker even flagged Ok as an ...
Mike's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote

Is it correct to sometimes capitalize words mid-sentence in computer user interfaces?

English is full of examples of writers who think they should capitalize Every Word that they think is Special. It's an archaic style and it looks officious and a bit silly. Most modern style guides ...
Sean McKibbon's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible