22

The major shortcoming I see with your approach is that you are introducing a rather uncommon interaction paradigm. This will make your app unique, likely at the cost of confusing users at least in the beginning. I dislike this pattern however, because it takes up real-estate and draws the user's attention away from the main content. As the touch icon you ...


18

I suppose the first point to make is that you shouldn't depend on invisible interactions to accomplish anything. The example made in virtualnobi's comment of iOS's swipe-to-delete gesture is a good example; Mail items etc. can be deleted the long way by choosing Edit, then checking the items you wish to delete, then choosing "Trash"/"Archive" at the bottom ...


17

On the XBox, there is the standard Guide gesture which pauses games and opens a menu where you can e.g. quit or restart the current level. Maybe you could use such a menu to offer a log out button that the user can touch or push. Use the Kinect Guide gesture to pause game play or open the Kinect Guide. To do this, position both arms at your sides. Now move ...


12

Add a drop shadow to the element so it appears pinned to the finger. Left: Material Design Components > Lists > Behavior Right: Apple Human Interface Guidelines > iOS > User Interaction > Drag and Drop Apple's HIG specifically mentions the ‘rising’ action: Touching and holding selected content makes it appear to rise and adhere to the user's finger.


11

Have the system log you out if you walk away. The workflow becomes walking up to the camera, holding up a QR code to log in, doing your work, then walking away. Next person repeats the same steps. If there are cases where a second user enters the range of the camera while the first is still present, or the same user needs to log in under a second account, ...


10

I have been dealing with designing for swipe gestures recently and you raise a very important question, as the main problem with most mobile gestures is discoverability . More and more, swipe is becoming a standard and well known gesture with the rise of Tinder. However, mobile users are still very much used to tapping buttons. Tapping is by far the most ...


9

As you have mentioned in the comments to the answer from @dan1111 logging in is as simple as holding up a QR code Could you not have a second QR code which the users hold up to log out? Alternatively you also state that spoken word input is acceptable so why try to re-invent the wheel - Just have the users state "Log me out" (I assume here that you can ...


8

It's difficult to overload a common action like click (tap) I've been able to ask a few people what they think of the latest Mac Book Pro with larger track pad and force touch and all of them have disabled the force touch option. Think about the friction this adds to the user when they now have to distinguish between clicking and really clicking something. ...


7

Use cut off content. Really simple visual idiom. I believe it could even be used to signify the elusive drag-down-to-refresh by showing a corner of a circle at the top.


7

I'm not sure usage heat maps are all that useful, as users tend to interact with the regions where the most important controls are - regardless if they are in the optimum location or not. There are some optimal thumb range heat maps in an article about thumb reachability for different sized iPhones. It might be used with tablets as well by mirroring the ...


7

I would say don't invent or reinvent a fundamental interaction unless you have a really good reason. I would also add that adding a hint to one or some cards is not enough to communicate the 'this works for all' or 'this works for all things that look similar'. Users like explicit indicators and cues. The visual recognition and familiarity is important, ...


6

Gestures that don't mimic real physical interaction are not easily learned. I would suggest you do not use a gesture for this but a button, icon, or text instead. Questions to ask before introducing a gesture: Am I adding value? Or is it a gimmick? Does this gesture make sense if it were manipulating the physical. How many seconds does this add to the ...


6

You can use progress indicators In your case this could be achieved with linear progress indicator: The indicator is superimposed on the element you want to long-press. When the user holds the element the progress indicator advances proportionally and the user stops the progress indicator stops loading. I haven't tried this in the real world but it seems ...


5

Current design has some bad features: Per-column layout isn't scalable, as the screen width is limited. And horisontal swipe for scrolling could conflict with screen changing gesture interaction. Per-column interaction isn't convenient, as the data is best readed row by row. Increase and decrease buttons rather small for touch interaction. You could ...


5

You're interpreting the animation as negative head shake because that fits with your cultural background, but ultimately it's just a way of drawing attention to the input. Just because you notice the association between the negative of the error and the negative of the 'shake' animation, doesn't necessarily mean that a person who doesn't make that ...


4

We had the same question at work a couple of months ago. I believe the confusion occurs because of the "zoom in/out" and "pinch in/out". For our project, We defined as: pinch in --> when we spread the fingers (so it means zoom in) pinch out --> when we bring the fingers together (so it means zoom out) I would also suggest Luke Wreblowski as a strong ...


4

I believe this is what you're looking for: http://www.mobiletuxedo.com/touch-gesture-icons/


4

I work in the mobile sphere and we have terrible trouble with gestures. Firstly, everyone wants them. What a lot of clients fail to appreciate is Gmail et al are purpose built apps where the gesture usual conforms to an action, so broad use isn't appropriate. Secondly, there's often little visual indication that a swipe gesture is available, so in a UX/UI ...


4

In a word, no. There is no consensus on swipe actions in apps. To illustrate the lack of consensus, here's a quick list of some applications of swipe actions: (When I say "swipe right", I mean swiping from left to right.) Google Android notifications: both left and right for dismissing Android recents: both left and right for dismissing Android wear: ...


4

I do not think that there is publicly available research specifically on the pull-to-refresh feature. However, I synthesized some similar materials and came up with an answer of my own. Taps vs Swipes Swipe gestures are faster and easier, but often considered "hidden." Florian Weil's research on touchscreen gestures concludes only that screens are ...


4

In addition to other answers: Major shortcoming: long press is already in use. Where? Windows devices with touchscreen use long press of finger to initiate right click at given location. Anywhere, including web browsers. (Example on Youtube). The effect of executing custom action on long press can be therefore unpredictable and it could depend on the ...


4

I think the solution is to understand that although the gesture is the same, the functionality is different. The first is a Swipeable Menu with hidden tabs and the second is a Swipeable List with hidden options. In other words, the first one is a Carousel and the second a list with a swipe functionality. While in the list it's easily deductible for the user ...


3

I think a combination of animating a slide-in for sections together with a small arrow on the side is the most clear way of indicating the content is slide-able. Bullets can indicate how much content is available and the current position of the user. Image taken from sliders.webflow.com


3

Depending on the use case of your platform it might be not so funny if you can't turn things off instantly. In other words: If the motion capture software doesn't capture it properly and doesn't turn off. Therefore I'd suggest using something highly reliable. The most reliable thing is less than a gesture, something that can easily get recognized: No ...


3

I see no reason why not. Provided the following holds true. No impact on normal user operation This are advance user actions. As such, they may not be easily discoverable to every user. It may not be intended for a normal user to perform those operations. In any case, there should not be any impact on normal operation of the user. The usability and trust ...


3

Here are some of the most common ones I have seen in a variety of style guides and documentation. If you want to see if users are familiar with them you could set up a mechanical turk and ask them to guess what they would think the following features might mean on a device. Or if its a new gesture or a gesture they are already aware of. via uxmag.com ...


3

Some desktop applications do take left/right handedness into account, for example games often use the WASD keys for directional movement, but also have IJKL set up by default. Equally some applications don't take it into account. When I broke my right wrist and had to hold the mouse with my left hand, I soon realised how the keyboard shortcuts for a lot of ...


3

Double tap is the default for zooming back to normal in iOS. It works in photos, safari and a lot of other apps and is encouraged in the guidelines. Material guidelines talk about it too: A pinch, or two quick taps, allows users to zoom into and out of content. I’m pretty sure it’s a standard expected behaviour for users by now.


2

This movie on Vimeo displays the Clear iOS app. It demonstrates some gestures that create new items. I'm not saying they are standard, but it may be a start. They seem to have two: pull down, and pinch out.


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