9

Case 1: A user might have set their browser to automatically allow Geo Location to be sent to websites making a request to obtain it. Case 2: A user might have set it to "ask for permission" i.e. when a site tries to get the user's geo data he gets a pop-up. In Case 1: A user would never know the website recorded his geo-location, while in Case 2: A user ...


7

That's an interesting question that cuts to the heart of your user's expectations. I'd argue that the experience in question begins before the user even downloads the app from the app store. How do you 'pitch' the app? Is geolocation the feature, or is it a minor option? If users clearly understand that the app is all about location ("Find restaurants ...


7

People are making a lot of sense from the software side, but I think we need to look deeper. You essentially don't want people to be an expense without providing revenue. In that case, what's to stop a user from going to the restaurant, checking in, and leaving without spending any money? The only way to ensure revenues exceed expenses is to tie them ...


6

The best way to handle this is to handle it gracefully. Communicate that the app couldn't find their location, but do it in a way that tells them how to fix the problem. "Unable to obtain location" tells me what the problem is, but it says nothing about how to fix the problem. Users see messages like this and think that the app is being rude and telling ...


4

Don't think there is a correct way necessarily, but providing the user with the information they need to continue is beneficial. The issue would be that keeping an up to date set of information on how to allow locations on each browser could become tiresome and result in out of date information, which is potentially unhelpful. If you rely heavily on ...


4

Default Location: The app can ask the user to narrow down a default location, or this could perhaps be queried from the device being used. For example, in the absence of GPS or GEO IP I may have previously specified that I am in "Seattle, WA", or just "Washington", but maybe just "United States". This would allow you to zoom in onto a specific location. ...


4

Number of search results! Setting a distance will give varying results. Rather, you'd search for an optimum number of search results. This will always give the user: The closest items (arguably what they'll be looking for most of the time) An idea of how far most of them are (let the USER decide if that's too far away or not) Remember, you're showing the ...


4

I think the main problem with the current design is the visual separation between the textual search option and the geolocation option. You are giving the user a choice between these two search methods but not presenting them together in the same place. The text search option is displayed prominently at the top and is easy to recognise but the geolocation ...


4

If a website wants to know my location I will immediately assume it wants to use it for targeted marketing. A vague "it will enrich user experience" won't make things better as I take this as a petty excuse still assuming the above. Tell the user exactly what you need the location for, how it will be used and how the user benefits from it. If you have a ...


4

Be upfront, clear, honest, give choice to opt out If your user's choose not to provide a location on their profile then they will expect to miss out on location specific features. All you can do is provide prompts to add a location at relevant places. Also, if you ask for a location, they choose not to supply one, then they start receiving location based ...


4

What if a Temporary QR code is Randomly Generated in the Rewards App, and then scanned in the premises? So, here is the story - 1) When I want to check-in, I fire the rewards app, and it generates a random QR code. 2) At the counter, or say a mounted tablet device or something, the scanning app is available. I scan the random QR code and check-in. 3) The ...


4

My experience with currency selectors (3 types): Overlay at first visit (HM.com) Pretty annoying but accurate because the user is forced to choose a country / a currency. Works well with returning customers if you save their choice in a cookie. Pure GeoIP Can be a pain in the ass if you have to browse using a VPN. Make sure to provide a noticeable ...


4

Use some form elements to interact with the map or use a button to confirm that the location selection is done so the interaction focus gets out of the map. Here's Uber example - they do it well: Edit Place a small button/icon on the map that reads 'Go to top', this will take the focus away from map and users won't have a difficulty in scrolling.


3

If location is required/highly recommended for your website's functionality. e.g. perform a location specific search. Consider asking for the permission at the step where the geolocation info is actually required. It makes it clear why you're asking for this info and the user can decide whether they want to provide this or not. So for a store/branch ...


3

Postcodes are appropriate here. Every house (indeed every building really) has a postcode. They're more or less unique (well, places share postcodes if they're in the same street, but one postcode only exists in one part of the country) unlike other options such as town name where there could be several of them. (Westbury, Newcastle, Hadleigh...) There ...


3

My experience running studies was that about 25-30% of study participants using Chrome didn't even notice the request. Some participants quickly scanned content on the site and ignored everything else. They hadn't considered whether they wanted to 'allow' or 'deny' geolocation -- they hadn't even noticed that a decision was being requested.


3

As always, it depends of type of user and service. For example, Users will accept if you explain the benefit, and it is worth it. Younger users will be less reticent to accept than older ones. And so on. I have been working on a responsive website for a clothing store franchise, and the smartphone version asks geolocation when you are looking for the ...


3

So I actually did my Masters thesis research on the default zoom level and level of detail that users prefer when working with way finding and identification tasks. Overall, users tend to prefer a large scale map (more zoomed in) and a generalized view (as opposed to satellite imagery). However, there are exceptions to this. When setting the initial zoom, ...


3

Preparing the user and giving them control is key. Coercion is likely to disengage users from your site altogether. Explain why you need the information Provide an alternate route to acquire the information, one that the user is fully control of. Remember the goal is to get a users preferred book trading location, not to have 'geolocation enabled' This ...


3

There's quite a lot of research into the subject, and the most commonly referenced is from the Pew Research Centre. In April 2012 it was found that around 35% of users turn location services off. A more recent piece of research from Pew suggests that significantly more people have it enabled, with GeoMarketing interpreting this as a 90%-enabled rate. ...


3

Maybe you could ask them for a zip code or city or something like that?


2

I would suggest keep the geolocation option as default. But, also provide a search-assisted search box to the user. There might be a case when the user wants to look up restaurants situated in a different location. Also, instead of sounding apologetic and saying "Sorry there are no restaurants.." consider ending the bad news quickly and provide options to ...


2

Providing no result with "based on the following search" badge is obviously a terrible solution, thus I think you have chosen wisely. In early days of this kind of apps, it's a good practice to create some algorithm that would route user so he won't see "no content" page, unless he performs a tightly defined search. For the mobile app, there definitely ...


2

Distance Measurement Absolute distance measurements are hardly assessed by people, it's better to use more tangible measure unit, which is time. Google Maps use both parameters for car and walking routes (Google asumes walking speed is about 4.5 km/hour), and time only for public transport routes: . . . . . Distance Information People search ...


2

Instead of setting a default value, I would recommend just showing the results and allowing the users to sort by the service required so that they get more accurate results as this example shows Restricting to a minimum value can cause your users to miss out on great restaurants or places to visit nearby if the restaurant or place is just out of your ...


2

I would not automatically request their location. In addition to the privacy concerns you have, some amount of users will not access your site from their "home" location (at work, on their mobile, etc.), and they'll be forced to delete and re-enter information about their home city. Instead, maybe consider a "Use My Current Location" button near the form ...


2

For your purposes I agree postcodes sound the most likely candidate, although the first part of the postcode may give you the data/grouping you require e.g. S - Sheffield, LN - Lincoln. Checkout these article on Wikipedia List of postcode areas in the United Kingdom and List of postcode districts in the United Kingdom It would probably be best to capture ...


2

Show my location. See the top answer to this question: "Your" vs "My" in user interfaces When users tell the program what to do, use 'my' (e.g. show my location). When the program asks the user, use 'your' (e.g. do you want to share your location?).


2

Let the user select the country. This will bring consistency to the UI without losing anything at all. If you add next button this will increase a tap which is same as selecting the country from the list. The biggest advantage you gain from this approach is that you will have consistency in the UI and user will already know from his experience with prior ...


2

The best solution from a user perspective is probably having a single search field, as we can see on Booking.com. At the same time, it's also the most complicated to develop. When designing this type of search field, the main issues you usually need to face are: duplicates (e.g. there are up to 28 "London" in the world, approximately 18 of them in the US)...


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