52

The struggle for a good top-rating system is...nightmarish. I've gone through it several times, and agree that gold/silver/bronze isn't particularly great. Here are some alternatives: Smiley faces: Special rankings can be given with any number of different smiley faces using either custom or existing emoji. Unfortunately, ranking those individually is a ...


34

Gamification is a design tool. You might call it a buzzword or a temporal rage but it is gaining proper academic support. The most concise definition that I have come across is: Gamification is the use of game element and game design techniques in a non game context. Gamification needs voluntariness (if you are forced in a Points,badge system it is NOT ...


32

I quite like Foursquare's method for this - they use coloured badges for achieved, grey ones for unachieved, and add a 'Retired' banner to those that are no longer available:


29

All the answers here are glass half empty. Good news is, the glass is actually 90% full for you. World of Warcraft (clearly what you should emulate if you're talking gamification) has this exact 'problem', and turns it into an opportunity. Many of their in game achievements become unattainable, due to a variety of reasons. Do they delete people's ...


21

Nice. I like your idea of rewarding the good ones much more than blaming the bad ones. Don't know what type of company it is but finger pointing feels like from the old days and doesn't support a great work environment. For the 'Reporting time highscore' you might want to reward those who always report on time but also encourage everybody else to be shown ...


21

Since nobody referred to alternatives to metals on the level of cultural philosophy: I think you are right that gold, silver and bronze are outdated as a universal symbol of rewarding. As we tend to redefine characteristic values of human individuals as mental properties rather than material properties, I suggest discussing symbols of human evolution ...


21

In some situations, something similar to army ranking can be used:


16

My honest opinion is that the time spent / total time label is enough, and that also adding the percentage is redundant information. So why do I think that, especially considering Khan Academy has both a Done / Total label + a percentage label? The answer is in what differentiates your two scenarios. In your design you have a progress bar which doesn't ...


15

My 2¢ are summed up by the Clash of Clans League hierarchy: Not necessarily a shield with stuff on it, but a very "basic" design, that looks meaner and cooler for higher levels. Even if it is a ■ -> ⬟ -> ★ or something like that.


14

Note: This is my second reply, and I'm not rep-whoring. So please choose one (or neither) of my suggestions... For kids, you can use something similar to The Potato Head as a motivator and progression indicator:


13

In short, no. It will not help "to get rid of late time reports". High scores will NOT motivate anybody at tail of highscore list - they "know" there is no chance to get on top. And if someone wanted to change it, the "price" of better score is not worth the price they get for being late (it means the punishment is too low). Maybe the reason for being at ...


12

One situation of gameification that had poor results was Google Image Labeler. The premise was simple: in an effort to improve the quality of results from Google Image Search, two players were randomly paired and then shown an image. They had a time limit to create tags for the image and would score points if they had matching tags. The rationale was that by ...


10

Gamification is way better than a wall of shame. Research shows that that punishment does not really work for changing behaviour while encouragement does(See for example "Thinking Fast and Slow" by Kahneman). While the idea of gamification is probably effective(Looking at for example fitocrazy) Tt would probably be more effective trying to address the root ...


9

I would ask what does "dull" and "boring" mean? I think you're assuming too much about the end result. As in, that by adding points or stats on the backend that you'll be able to convince them that it was better than it was. I would venture to say that it most likely needs to be more pleasing to the eye as those words they used mostly describe look and ...


8

If you're going to a use a multi-tiered award system, ask yourself, Can the user (a) see every tier or (b) accurately predict every tier? If the answer to either (a) or (b) is "No" then any award that you give to the user will probably be meaningless to him/her. The core function of giving an award is to give feedback: people want to know if they've ...


8

Is it worth it to add some gamification? Yes, but do some research first. Gamification done poorly can backfire. In the links below, each one describes successes AND failures. I don't think you'd ask this question if you had already dug deep into gamification, so let me share a few of the resources I enjoyed: Online Classes The online classes I've ...


7

tl;dr: Gamify the courses, not their completion "the courses themselves can be a little dry" Changing that should be your first and foremost concern. While you might not be able to take any influence on the subject of the course, you sure can improve its presentation by way of infographics, user interaction, formatting, … You can gamify dull tasks ...


7

If I'm in class and staring down the clock until I can leave then I have zero desire to know how much time I've spent in there. All I care about is how many minutes till X o'clock. With the psychology stated above I think the most beneficial piece of information you can give is Time remaining: 17 minutes and update this as time passes. I think that if you ...


6

An interesting clue in your question is: "this might be potentially de-motivating to people who have 'lost' a lot of previously acheived badges." How can you avoid disappointment? I think you need to re-frame the issue of "lost" or "depreciated" badges in to be more phrased in a positive way. Instead of presenting the old badges like "You've lost these ...


6

Think of this as a data visualization problem: The awards make up an ordinal scale, where a "particular value has no significance beyond its ability to establish a ranking over a set of data points". You need to show one is greater or less than the other. Gold, Silver and Bronze refer to the Olympic medals and other sports. Arguably they are not a sure ...


6

There’s often a three-tier ranking system that can be deduced from the setting of the site or application. You can even have more symbolic slots than that. The sports medal metaphor is quite well understood, tough, but the different metals, especially yellowish gold and brownish bronze may be hard to distinguish. Note that this base system has been adapted ...


6

I'd suggest not using a progress bar or any explicit measure, instead give candy. The first step is to get your users to enter an acceptable level of data, once this is done show them a green light. Next encourage them with messages to enter more data. If they enter any data give them a star or other token (design in keeping with the nature of your system)....


5

You're missing LinkedIn. Here's what my profile looks like: You've probably seen it already - when you log in to LinkedIn, they ask you "Is this person good at X?" and you just click to say "yes" or skip to someone else. This works pretty well in practice, although it can obviously be "gamed" by filling in something in your profile and asking your mates ...


5

Real World Motives Trump Game World Motives Presumably, there is something to motivate the users or else they wouldn’t get involved in the first place. If not, then you’re being unfair to the users and you should provide some extrinsic reward, such as paying them. However, it sounds like you’re relying on volunteers motivated to do something for a ...


5

Thinking deeply on the motivations behind your users might help more than a specific mechanism. Knowing why a user might care enough to actually complete a task should lead you in the right direction. For instance: personal improvement helping their fellow man vanity raising awareness of a cause reputation in a community of peers being the first or best in ...


5

Perception is geared in favor of differences and change. For stable enterprises, an ERP system might not be a source of information about changes. One suggestion would be analyzing the various channels of data and look for opportunities to highlight global and local changes that might be "news" for anyone using the system. I strongly disagree that the ...


5

Be careful. Other factors can play into this game. I remember from my time reporting agency days we needed to have the appropriate job or time codes to report against. That relied on someone else in Sales, HR or Administrative to activate/input. It became nearly impossible to have accurate time in at the end of the week if someone further up the chain didn't ...


5

If all of them are "hidden", then it discourages the initial "buy in", but if all of them are "visible", then users will tend to just do what's needed to get the badges. Mixing them up is a good solution, with easier badges visible right off to get the initial buy-in (in some cases a "you pressed the start button!" badges), and then some hidden to ...


5

If scheduling the next ride is the most important thing, then I'd strongly consider a visual redesign that gives that action more importance. It makes sense to give them a congratulatory message, followed by a summary of where their balance stands, and then a call-to-action that engages them in your app. Underneath that CTA you could place a button to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible