16

For starters I recommend looking at this excellent article from UX Matters which talks about how to extend Jesse James Garret’s visual vocabulary to reflect rich interactive applications which recommends highlighting the interactions as synchronous (requiring a page load)and asynchronous (happening within the page). To quote the article For user ...


9

I've worked on visual programming systems/languages and I agree with Frederick Brooks. Graphical or diagrammatic or any kind of non-text based languages do not make good general purpose programming languages. Text is very efficient at describing complex things, especially behaviors and actions, usually much better than non-text. A picture is worth 1000 words ...


9

This is a good question. I've been wandering if there is a better way to document interactions for over a year now and have been trialling a few different things. I've taken inspiration from a lot of different places and below are the different types of methods I've created/trialled in the past with some success. The images below show interaction with an ...


7

Allow 2 views: Sequential view for displaying orders by sequential steps, and a production floor view to show bottlenecks and throughput. Since you can't have a strict order across all steps, have two ways to view the world: at the order level, and the production floor. They serve two different purposes. In either view, you can indicate on the left how many ...


6

I have worked for a long time writing software for the financial industry, and I have to say that Excel is by far the most successful visual programming interface for non-technical users. Novice users start off working with simple rows and columns. They start "programming" with simple drag to select and sum a column (or some other simple operation), and ...


4

Does using color help? Try using matching colors on the nodes of the flow chart and the connectors like so...


3

A flowchart is a very technical documentation method, and I've seen a lot of non-technical users struggle with understanding them. Also, describing complex orders of individual steps in a flowchart is generally not easy. So, in this particular case for board game instructions, maybe plain-text instructions might actually be the better choice. You already ...


3

I realise that you've already done something else, but one other approach you could take is to retain the "arrows" metaphor, but turn them so the arrows go down the screen instead of across. Then you could retain the implied flow, but also have more width for the associated text. Excuse the hasty and hacky photoshop job (terrible text alignment, etc...), ...


3

They will overlap unless you lift some nodes above the plane where the rest are. Another way to avoid overlapping would be show only connections that matter in given period of time/for given point.


2

im still fascinated about the software http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MeVisLab . It helps to see the flow of the app in kinda tree hierachy, but enables also developing extreme complex modules, that then a non-tech user can use for its own ideas.


2

I found the more successfull project in the field is a plugin for unity 3D : playmaker. Playmaker is a visual states machine that emphasize on helping games devellopper on main tasks and allow to iterate quickly with visual feedbak in real time. In fact maybe nodes are not the best visual system to help non programming people to understand code logic. Each ...


2

I believe that an activity diagram is the ULM-diagram you're looking for... In the activity diagram, you use a black bar to indicate the start or end of concurrent activities:


2

If not every step is necessary in the flow for a given order, perhaps you could represent each step as an icon or a graphic, color-coded to represent its status (along with some sort of graphic change, since relying on color alone is a poor idea for accessibility). Color/shape changes could be employed to represent not yet started, in progress, delayed, ...


2

You could show the user in the flowchart, like this: If you use swimming lanes, it's quite common to have a lane for (a certain class of) user:


1

It sounds like you are talking about Dashboard (your 'contextual') vs Wizard (your "all-in-one-bucket"). Dashboard being a set of top-level options with which you decide the context. Wizard is typically a set of screens/forms that prompt for the necessary information/choices to determine the outcome. The Dashboard flow is simple, allows Users to get a feel ...


1

What you probably want is a decision node with multiple guards as per this example There is NO single symbol. Multiple possible conditions are handled by the normal decision nodes (flow control, or "IF" block) is used, but one has different guards (or criteria) for each route. Why no single symbol? It is a common misconception that UML is about "diagrams"...


1

There are two possibilities I would consider for this. 1: Work with colored lines for types of users with a legend that explains the different colors. User 1 is red User 2 is green User 3 is blue User 4 is yellow If you wanted to know what type of can view what you just have to follow the designated colored line. The downside of this is that your ...


1

Physical representations are usually good if it is done for high level processes or workflows that don't change frequently. As pointed out in the comments, digital solutions are much more flexible and scalable. The same type of interactivity as a physical board can also be replicated if there is a touch screen. One suggestion/advice that would make your life ...


1

You can present a view from 10000 meters that shows the complete flow chart and that lets navigate to certain parts of the flow chart by clicking the point at which the viewport will be centered.


1

You seem to be willing to both : show everything the user will eventually (have to) go through and highlight what the user can do now I've always thought that language learning site Duolingo was doing a great job in this respect : The entire set of possibilities is visible but those that are not yet accessible (based on the progress rules) are just greyed ...


1

I think the approach taken when they designed the DRAKON visual language is something to consider while choosing or designing a visual programming language. For DRAKON they designed a set of rules or constraints applied in a visual manner that try to emulate or improve the rules used for text based programing languages. In text based programming languages ...


1

After two years I'm sure you have found your system. But I'd still like to mention this link I tripped over a few weeks ago. The author uses a spacious template, integrating wireframes and work-flows. Every transition is annotated with a link to a video describing the transition between frames in detail. Large Canvas Flows + with references


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