Hot answers tagged

19

It has been discussed in the google forums but it seems that there isn't any clue about it. The only theory I can imagine of is related to the situation when someone starts googling about an specific topic and opens a lot of tabs (which will be opened on the right), then when navigating, the result might be found in the first previously open tabs, so you ...


11

Jennifer Morrow (part of the Firefox user experience design team) wrote a pretty detailed blog post about removing the Firefox status bar in 2010. As already mentioned, the aim was to remove the unnecessary "chrome" from the Firefox UI. I'd recommend you read the whole post. A short extract: The goal is to find places where chrome can be minimized, both ...


6

It's actually not a scroll bar. It's an indicator to show which of the tabs are currently visible in the browser tab bar. The ones in the list outside the grey indicator are also outside the tab bar in the browser. It's there to make it easier for users to orientate and look among the tabs that are currently not shown in the browser. Try and use the < ...


5

This is a security feature. It is to prevent unintended downloads. If the user is attempting to interact with the webpage, for instance typing some prescribed text or double-clicking somewhere, without a delay, it would be possible for malicious websites to unexpectedly prompt for a download, and unintentionally be given approval by the user. For more ...


4

Chrome was a major change in browsers. The major change it brought was screen space. Where IE and FF came from desktop apps and windows Chrome removed a significant amount of the 'Chrome' surrounding the window. The only thing it cared about was getting as much of the Web page displayed as possible. Chrome was backed by Google and achieving massive growth (...


4

I agree with @rewobs about the first tabs often being more important. It's not just a common observation, but actually a very reasonable occurrence, because new tabs open on the right. So if I open my "main" item (my inbox, my facebook feed, an article), and then it leads me to open a bunch of secondary items (through links in the original), the secondary ...


3

I agree with both previous answer but they've missed one pretty important point > Locked Tabs are always staying most to left. If you'd have a possibility to close tabs to the left you'd just simply always close your Pinned/Locked Tabs – which you for sure don't want to. IMHO that's the main reason – personally I'm using locked tabs for most important ...


2

Use a pin icon. Thanks to Pinterest and the use of this icon in other apps (Microsoft Office, Google apps, etc) it is much more recognizable than stack icons.


1

If you are going to prompt the user to do anything, you should consider what the user is doing when you are prompting them, and why you are prompting them. Prompts should occur in the right context and help the user achieve their goal. In this particular case, "might enhance [their] experience" is an insufficient reason to stop the user from doing what ...


1

While some changes (for example making the whole UI take up less vertical space) indeed look like they copy Chrome, it is a trend almost all browsers followed. However, it is in face changed user hardware, namely the growing predominance of widescreen displays and the consequent higher importance of vertical screen space, that induced this change - Chrome ...


1

A change in the UX is not necessarily bad; good designers think about not only their existing user base but also their business strategy and new users who they want to attract. Their decision process would probably have considered the possible inconvenience to their existing user base weighed against the increase in usability for new users. A number of the ...


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