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0

You just described the solution in your question. Implement that solution and test it


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Make use of the "progressive disclosure" principle. First, you want the user to find items that are tagged news, event, project etc. You can do this by adding a filtering pattern with checkboxes for each type of tag. Secondly, begin by revealing the most important facts about each item in the search results. If you add too much info for each item ...


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Give the users more control and don't apply filters they haven't set already. On the main page you can "suggest" properties but other than that, if the user has different criteria in mind you can not impose a property on them. A good case study for this situation is AirBnB. They show everything available on minimal criteria (city and dates) and ...


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My recommendation is to add a filter button right under the search field. When the user taps it, the filtering options will cover the entire screen. This way, the user can focus on all the parameters that the filtering system offers. Then, after applying the filter provide multiple ways of displaying the results such as (by how recent it was added, price, ...


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You could consider this solution for accordion combined with checkboxes.


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Given the system constrains and the user flow, the "Apply Filter" button could be within each pop-up filter window. So the user applies each category of filters before moving to the next. Furthermore, it seems the popup has more levels of filters to it with a checkbox option to select all child filters under each. The levels and number of options ...


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It seems the image provided would not really qualify as a "small screen". There is plenty of room to rearrange the body content and fit the filter sidebar to show at all times. Filter overlays that hide the body is more suitable for small screens such as mobile, where screen real estate is very limited. Covering the body with the filter options is ...


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this is an age-old question. I first saw satisfactory implementation in NeXTSTEP in 1990, and in some Windows applications including Windows 95 file manager file property-sheets around 1997. Still often not done properly. this comes up in your context, search criteria entry. this also comes up in any context where Properties of many objects-- a multiple ...


3

agree with the above answers, but note that the CONCEPT of "filter", even if that word is spelled out, won't be obvious to many users (confirm this via User Research). My 85 year old mother, for example, never uses a filter in the kitchen (food-cooking context) and would never guess that's where she'd tell the computer about her "dietary ...


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Filters are there to increase search result relevance. They have no other purpose in existing. For this reason, most sites with filters will exclude unknown values when filtering by a field. This is what users expect: if you filter by price from $100 to $200, you would not expect to see a page of results of donuts and new cars! You'd expect to see things ...


1

It is commonly used, but I doubt it it recognised as widely as some other more common icons such as settings (cogs), home, hamburger menu, and so on. Myself, despite decades of use of tons of software and sites and being quite attentive to UI/UX issues, it always takes me a few seconds to actually match the icon to its meaning. Probably because the shape is ...


11

I do see the funnel icon used widely for "filter" but in this case you've labeled it "preferences", so I think we have a bit of a disconnect there. I would expect most users to think of "preferences" in terms of what colour their background is, quite different than filtering content (as in selecting the results of a search). ...


5

To answer the question: the filter icon isn't used much. If you want to use it and you have space adding text "Filter Results" is always going to make it make more sense to people who speak English.


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No, use the icon with a label. It's not safe to assume that people understand the meaning of the icon as it is used to adjust their preferences and to filter the results. So the meaning is already dubious. When you search for a preferences icon you get mainly cogs and sliders. But when you search for filter icons you get mainly funnels and sliders. See below....


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The NNGroup sums it up pretty nicely here: Icon Usability A user’s understanding of an icon is based on previous experience. Due to the absence of a standard usage for most icons, text labels are necessary to communicate the meaning and reduce ambiguity. There are a few "standard icons" that are almost universally recognized, such as the ...


0

I would suggest keeping the empty option in the filters, so users know that it is an option (even if it is empty at this moment). This would be to minimize confusion. I like the empty state when clicking on the empty option, but it does require an extra tap to find out it is empty. If this was a webshop, I wouldn't want to find out the item in my cart is out ...


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I would suggest Option 1. If the Filter 1,2,3,4 is a constant, it is better to have them fixed rather than having any removed if the data is empty. It is better to display the empty state message so user will understand that there is no data for the filter.


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