226

This user behaviour indicates a great opportunity to improve the usability of your application. Ask a few users why they rename items and try to understand the underlying need or problem that they are facing. Depending on what answers you get, possible solutions might include: Allow sorting the list in different ways; by date/user/... Allow users to add a ...


64

When it comes to optimising the design, users happen to be the best designers. I would suggest that – instead of guessing - you should get in touch with these Users, who hacked the sorting mechanism to ask what they wanted to achieve. Maybe they wanted just to pin some items to the top of the list, for which starring would probably be enough. But maybe ...


26

There are many factors contributing to this. Enterprise apps are evaluated by their functional features, not by their UI. When the UI does come into play, it's evaluated by its efficiency, not by its look and feel. By "efficiency" I mean comparisons like "with our software your employees will complete the task in 10 minutes, and with the competing software ...


17

Money talks, bullshit walks Companies that don't naturally prioritise UX (ie most companies) need to be sold why it's important to spend money on improving UX. So the best way to do it is have a clear business rationale as to why it's important. Is it to improve conversion? Great! What percentage increase in conversion do you expect it to improve? Even ...


14

As well as pinning items to the top of the list, fake-alphabetical entries can be used to pin them to the bottom (a trivial example: I use a contact called ZZ spam with a silent ringtone on my phone). In other words it's quite a flexible system. Consider how sorting by a range of parameters is built in so widely: All file managers allow you to get the ...


12

Wikipedia says this on Enterprise Software: Enterprise software, also known as enterprise software application (ESA), is purposed-designed computer software used to satisfy the needs of an organization rather than individual users. Such organizations can vary from businesses, schools, interest-based user groups and clubs, retailers, or governments. ...


12

Notify the user inside the app, but try to avoid interrupting their workflow. The Nielsen Norman Group did a study on mobile intranets that touched on this topic. They gave seven strategies that help avoid errors and improve productivity for mission-critical applications. From the article: "Recognize that, even for the most proficient practitioners, ...


9

This is a strategy usually followed by companies that follow price discrimination as a strategy. This could be because: The cost of providing that product actually depends (usually statistically) on who is asking for it. Think of insurance companies here, where a healthy 18 year old with no history of medical problems is likely to cost a lot less to ...


9

task completion times, error rates, completion rates, subjective satisfaction using SEQ, perceived satisfaction of usability using SUS, if you can track mouse clicks, then you can test your IA using tree testing to see number of wrong clicks. Above all, your team must define what their UX goals are - effectiveness, efficiency, accuracy, ease of discovery, ...


9

It's about ROI Whether it is the project manager or yourself that sets UX priorities, some cost/benefit analysis has to be made. Nearly all systems will involve many more end-users than admins, so it makes sense to cater for end-users more than to admins. There's nothing wrong with that - it's a wise economical choice. Remember that UX and development ...


9

When users add special characters to the beginning of the names they create two or more kind of objects, or categories, in the sort. These categories can be specific, as the ones in this example, or more general ones like favorite / not_favorite or objects_I_am_working_on / others. You could provide the feature to make this distinction, to categorize ...


7

This pattern is a known one, yes. I have seen it implemented in popular datagrid library components such as devexpress. However, it is not a widely spread one because it is not that easy to action something at one area in order to see something at another (sounds like a game puzzle right?). A more usable Master-Detail pattern would display the information ...


6

Because when you ask a question about User Interface you get 12 responses about User Experience and not a single person who articulates the distinctions between the two. What you're describing is the lipstick. The question, to me, sounds more like "Why aren't enterprise offerings pretty and slick?", which is a much different question than "Why can ...


6

There's an old saying, "Treat kind people kindly. Treat unkind people even more kindly." With the user interface, I think an analogy applies: "Take good advice seriously. Take bad advice even more seriously." It could be that the "attitudinal feedback" is bad advice based on nothing more than an aesthetic preference. Or they don't understand the data ...


6

I think the main question you need to ask yourself is: What does success look like to you? If success means happy users/customers you could look into net promoter score (NPS). If success means users completing tasks quickly, you could measure task completion time. If success means users encountering only a small amount of errors/bugs, you could track ...


5

The short answer Enterprise companies may perceive less motivation to support UX because of a difference in chronology of monetization relative to web companies. On the web: the user experiences UX -> money follows For enterprise software: the company (not the user) pays -> the user experiences UX after the money has been paid -> the user's experience ...


5

Yes! (but it's not what you think) Let's start with the downside of using profile pictures: Visually they can really clutter up lists and layouts. They are not terribly communicative. For enterprise applications a name is a lot more functional than a picture. You have to figure out how to get users to upload photos without making it a hurdle or an ...


5

It's possible that no matter what feature you implement, users may still continue to do this (unless you forcibly disallow it). Consider another system where this happens all the time: computer filesystems. Most file browsers sort names alphabetically, and you'll see users do all sorts of things to work around (or, I would say, with) that, like putting ...


4

I'm just going to address the OP's problem statement in my reply below with existing and proven trends. Your best solution is to just ring/vibrate the device and show a persistent OS notification. keep vibrating the device and/or make sounds regularly (with brief intervals say one every minute) until user sees or discards or approves your notification. ...


4

I'm always very allergic to articles about these kind of topics saying "this way of working is the new hype and it totally works for enterprise businesses". My problem with Lean UX is that is says that you can focus more on the User Experience by spending less time on wireframes and prototyping and letting your user use the product sooner, but the user ...


4

Lean UX is driven by principles, not prescriptions As Lean UX has gained popularity, it's not surprising that it's been translated into a set of prescriptions like "don't create hi-fi wireframes", or "design must be cross-functional". In fact, Lean is not about these rigid prescriptions at all. Lean UX is driven by a core set of informed principles such ...


4

My perspective: 1.Where is UX designer (who is making also research/workshops/ etc) in organizational structure? ( The best solution is to be a boss, but you can't:) I have never run into an UX person who became a boss, in my career, but there were many boss-people who were claiming to be a "big UX enthusiasts", and boy what a nightmare that was — all ...


4

This technically isn't the right place to ask the question... but all fonts offered by Google are open source fonts. You can freely use it, embed it or modify it to your heart's content. All of the fonts are Open Source. This means that you are free to share your favorites with friends and colleagues. You can even customize them for your own use, or ...


4

Treat your question as an exercise in user research. This time, the users who you are researching are your own development team. How and where do decisions get made? Who is influential in making those decisions? How do they communicate? What are the competing priorities? How does work actually get done? Once you have a better understanding of your ...


4

My thought would be that it given it is a pretty common pattern that, like you say you want to, you should stick with it. Even if it is only used internally, having the logo and branding helps the user to quickly determine which app they are working with and can help them to find their bearings. This is particularly useful if they are moving between ...


4

If you're looking for an almost free tool, I need to tell you that Google Sheets is the best option. Here's how I set it up. It's called a "Rolling list of Observations" Columns U1, U2 etc are representing individual users.You start with the U1, note the observation(let's call it O1) in the observation column, and mark "1" for this particular user(U1). ...


3

Many of the above points are correct. Indeed, enterprise applications are usually evaluated by the efficiency of their algorithms. However, there is change as UX is slowly but steadily making its way into enterprise software. Additionally, Bad/cryptic UI in such software has maintained for a long time an imaginary status of expertise. Many users have ...


3

With any massive change / overhaul, you have to start somewhere. The most important thing is that you start. If you want to prioritize, try doing some research (perhaps even some usability testing) with your user base to discover what things they struggle with, or what annoys them the most. It can be as informal as a quick chat if you are short on time / ...


3

In terms of UX, you should redesign when necessary, and that should be continuously. That's not to say you redesign the entire site continuously but rather you constantly redesign and improve the user experiences that make up the site. Sometimes that might be tweaking content on a particular page. Or re-arranging the flow of a wizard based on user ...


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