Hot answers tagged

82

It is primarily benefical for the company I start with companies that have a large community, for example amazon. They have 244 million users and therefore many e-mails to send and to reply to. Most of the sent e-mails probably are automatically generated shipping confirmations telling you not to reply, because this address was just created for sending e-...


79

There are already good answers on optimizing the existing success page. I want to add an alternative. Demo mode Skip the success page and log the user in immediately. There are a lot of examples of web applications, which allow access before verifying your email address. The user may browse the content, configure his profile, ... but public content ...


76

Quirky employs a variation of Option #1. Instead of asking to unsubscribe, they tell you that they've unsubscribed you, giving you an option (and incentive) to re-subscribe. I was pretty impressed with this strategy. I didn't resubscribe, but I appreciated them taking me off their list based on my viewing habits.


75

I would recommend against an auto-correct as domain name extensions are about to change drastically, to the point where an email ending with "sitename.anything" will be valid. Consider an inline check, which means it doesn't cause the frustration of the usual ENTRY > SUBMIT > ERROR MESSAGE > RE-ENTRY > SUBMIT name@company.co [!] Did you mean .com? Asking ...


73

No! You can't send "forgotten password" links to a single account if you have the same e-mail address, unless the user specifies a unique username. But what happens if the user forgets the username as well? Then you need to reset password on all accounts associated with the e-mail address.


50

Both seem perfectly fine to me but as far as preference goes, I'd say go with the second option. For any questions, please consult our Help Desk – or reply to this email. The reason being that it eradicates confusion. If you write the email address, a lot of people would think it is different from the one you sent and would write a new email to reply. ...


48

This one is quite easy, you simply can't. If you would use an address on an emailing list where the recipient has opt-out you violate the 6'th requirement of the CAN-SPAM Act. Doing so is violating the law and will enable the recipient to sue your company: Each separate email in violation of the law is subject to penalties of up to $16,000, and more ...


47

I would personally recommend the equivalent of john@johndoe.com, which is the format I use. I agree with your assessment — to me, emails like me@johndoe.com and hi@johndoe.com seem a bit too playful or informal. I like to use one email address across all the services I use, so something that is completely neutral is key. Hard to get more neutral than ...


45

Does the user need to know the specifics of what's happening? Resubscribe or Subscribe would seem to be more consistent for the user as their perspective would be more with regard to whether or not they are receiving the notifications and not so much the how.


44

Yes! There are no security problems. If two people share an email account, and one of them has an account on your site, either of them can reset the password on the account (since they both have access to the place where the "forgot username" and "forgot password" emails get sent). Both people have the ability to take control of the account, and that's ...


34

The options to choose Option 4: continue to send the emails If people don't want your emails they will tell you or Option 5: imply everyones getting the email This is a little dishonest but... well, no judgments. Just send them an email; seemingly out of the blue asking if they want to continue with your emails. Something along the lines of "We want ...


33

Relax. I get many emails a day from services that I am interested in, but the timing just isn't right (Meetup, Groupon, mailing lists). If I don't want them, I know how to unsubscribe, but usually seeing the first line or two without opening them is all I need. I'd be annoyed if you chastised me for not opening them. Maybe a more useful strategy is--if ...


29

We have spent the last months battling with what to do with email confirmation/verification - prior the user had to give all their details at sign up (way too many actually!) but couldn't actually login until they had confirmed their email address by clicking a link. We stood back and looked at why we did this - three reasons really, one being we wanted ...


26

Personally, I find this really annoying and really bad UX. There is a large music equipment online store in Europe, which does it differently, and I always enjoy interacting with them. When you reply to an invoice, you do not get just customer-care@whatever.example or billing@whatever.example, no, you actually get a direct email to the customer support ...


21

It depends on the app. You need to establish whether messaging is an integral part of the workflow for your users. Social platforms and collaboration apps often include an internal messaging mechanism. Other types of apps - not so much. But don't get hung up on the term "email" itself, because it will restrict your thinking to the conventional email - with ...


21

Essentially, what it comes down to... is are you dealing with USERS or PEOPLE on your site. Most companies prefer to have a relationship with a person. Exceptions would be reddit and other sites which are designed with anonymity in mind and are almost purely online communities. A verified email is a verified person behind the email. Prevents some simple ...


20

The most common way is to: Ask the user to enter her password before changing e-mail (even if she is currently logged in): this will help to avoid stealing of the account if user has forgotten to logout or somebody simply got user's cookies or something like this. Send an activation link to the new address and don't switch e-mails until the new one will be ...


18

It's the same as the floppy disk icon: if there was a natural successor, you would already know what it was. If you don't, it means that no natural successor has emerged. And if one hasn't, frankly, who cares?


17

First, I'd suggest reading my answer from a few years ago which explains the importance of the wording. Secondly, if you can eliminate the delay that'd be ideal. Even with changing the instructions, you're still going to get some complaints with a 5 minute delay. But assuming the delay is here to stay, here's how I'd write it... Almost done... We'...


17

One of the clearest examples of those I've seen went something like this: That's it, you've been unsubscribed! Didn't mean to unsubscribe? <Subscribe again>!


16

This will largely depend on what the verification entails in terms of user access. Option 1 I would say that (option 2) sending a verification code is more secure as users will have to input their verification code before the verification is complete, particularly if this is part of login ( 2 step verification). Option 2 This being said if the ...


16

As someone working in customer support, which of the following would make it easier for you to decide which mails you answer, which you forward to the technical staff, and which ones you ignore? If you got these e-mails to your contact address: Please implement feature X, we really need it! I bought product Y from you but it doesn't work Wow i liked the ...


14

The rationale is that someone (wisely) decided to ask users to confirm passwords because they cannot be seen as they are typed. Then, some eejit decided that if passwords should be entered twice, then so should email addresses, because they are important. Then some nincompoop decided that they would copy these eejits because there must be a good reason for ...


14

The best solution would be to handle those emails automatically and forward them to the appropriate recipient. For emails that can't be auto-forwarded, you can simply write an automatic email back reading something like: "Sorry, you can't reply to our automatic emails. Please login and do your action online (example.com/do/action). If you have any questions ...


13

The hello@domain.com address simply implies that when someone is going to send an email to that address, there will likely be a human on the other end. It's a subtle and friendly way to market yourself as a personable company with a personality. I automatically think of Aaron Walter over at Mailchimp and his approach to designing for emotions. Little ...


13

Your question seems to assume that email senders have to either remember the email address of the intended recipient, or will have to accurately reverse-engineer the email address of the intended recipient. You also seem to assume that email addresses must be of a single form company-wide. I think that the answers over-engineer a solution because they ...


12

So, we settled on an approach that offers both "to yourself" and "to a friend," here's a mobile wireframe to get a concept of what we ended up with. If anyone has any additional thoughts or suggestions on how to improve this, would happily hear them:


12

The primary issue here is that people do not know and nor do they care that email is not an instant technology. Albeit very rare, email has been known to get caught up in retry cycles and delivered weeks or months after it was initially sent. Since you have zero control over what happens when the message leaves your server such as routing, spam filters, and ...


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