32

I quite like Foursquare's method for this - they use coloured badges for achieved, grey ones for unachieved, and add a 'Retired' banner to those that are no longer available:


29

All the answers here are glass half empty. Good news is, the glass is actually 90% full for you. World of Warcraft (clearly what you should emulate if you're talking gamification) has this exact 'problem', and turns it into an opportunity. Many of their in game achievements become unattainable, due to a variety of reasons. Do they delete people's ...


19

Your assumption is correct, items ordered in a vertical list rather than a horizontal list or as a grid is a lot easier on the eyes to scan. The reason is quite straight forward, horizontal lists need to span a larger area and therefore the user has to move their focus larger distances which is tiring on the eyes. Same thing with grids, here the user has ...


16

Try to explain it in terms of reverse searching. Basically, "if you needed to find this database entry later, but you forgot its name, what would you type in the search box?"


10

Instead of a password, how about a passphrase? Kind of like needing to know the secret phrase to enter the club house. Passphrases tend to be less hackable by the nature of its length. http://xkcd.com/936/


9

You'll want to convey the benefits of proper tagging to her. What's in it for her? Show her that, demonstrate how it works, and you'll get buy-in. Your user sounds like a scientist. She'll get it. I'm guessing that you're absolutely right about this being a mental model mismatch. She seemed to think you were looking for alt text, based on the sample you ...


6

An interesting clue in your question is: "this might be potentially de-motivating to people who have 'lost' a lot of previously acheived badges." How can you avoid disappointment? I think you need to re-frame the issue of "lost" or "depreciated" badges in to be more phrased in a positive way. Instead of presenting the old badges like "You've lost these ...


5

A couple of slightly "hacky" solutions: Turn every single word into keywords; I'm imagining there's a search box somewhere (as opposed to a list of all keywords) and the client won't search for "the" anyway. If I'm wrong, and you do have a list of all keywords, perhaps that's not the right move. Try naming them something other than ...


5

I'm sure there are a LOT of studies on standardized testing that you'd probably be able to find by searching something like Google Scholar, but my first hunch is that it may be a bit distracting and may divide the users' attention to focus on information not directly relevant to successfully completing the quiz to the best of their ability. Users' attention ...


4

Yes, there are studies that show that having a mascot increases engagement etc. East Tennessee State University has published an Undergraduate Honours Thesis entitled: Analyzing the effects of brand mascots on social media: Johnson City Power Board case study. The research in this paper found that customers of Johnson City Power Board were more engaged ...


3

I have two alternative suggestions. To get her working along the right lines, get her to use two nouns (or noun phrases) for each animal. Only two. No more. Should focus her mind. (I'm assuming her anti-talent doesn't prevent her from identifying noun phrases.) No verbs allowed. This will probably be wildly off, potentially missing several nouns and ...


3

If the current badges make use of colour, presenting the deprecated badges in greyscale might work in this situation. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

So here is my take on how I would do it without knowing how your UI looks like. Use abbreviations with the status to differentiate Put them to the left of the table to allow for better scanning


2

I think you have to tailor your education/training to the type of job and organization you are looking to join. As far as I can see, there are three essential elements: Ability - if they are paying you to do a job, then they need to be confident that you have the skills and knowledge Experience - if you are not working on a standard project or just carrying ...


2

On top of the quantitative data capture proposed above, you may want to gently ask some users in those villages to let you observe them. You could for instance just set up a camera to record the room they use and leave them alone with the web portal. Watching their reactions might help to tell you when they're frustrated, not finding what they want, and ...


2

Reverse the roles; give the person (Person Y) a top-down look, as if floating above the person searching, or looking over the person searching's shoulder. In this process, you can explain that Person X is a first year computer science student, and Person Y, the administrator, is their lecturer. As a first year student, Person X might start to recognise ...


2

A possibility would be to mark the 'old' badges with a 'retired' label, as others have suggested, but maybe also include a new 'current' badge signifying accomplishment of the old badges. Maybe levels of a badge based on number of historic badges. 'badge buddy' 'badge all-star' 'look at the piles and piles of badges!' Still see the old badges, get a new ...


2

What about if you think of it from a Google search perspective? A search typically brings a resultset of millions, in pages of 30 or so...but one typically never goes past page 3 before trying to refine the search. Google has certain key techniques to refine the search, which quickly become very easy to use.


2

I think you should show a usual password field at first. Those users that come up with a secure enough (according to your rules) password shouldn’t be bothered with additional reading or even a password choosing wizard. You could show a password strength checker. Users that initially decided to use a password that’s not secure enough might reconsider when ...


2

Yes, it's possible. However, having prior work experience really helps especially if it's related to UX. I was in a similar situation to you, but because I had relevant work experience for 5 years, I was accepted to https://uclic.ucl.ac.uk which is regarded as one of the best HCI programs.


2

Percent of video completion would probably be most accurate way to track this but you won't avoid legit edge cases (like in your example :users skipping irrelevant videos). Why not let your user decide of what they completed ? If most of your users watch the whole content, it's easy to tag it as "completed" when video completion is more than the ...


2

You can get the right answer only by conducting user research and domain research. Domain research It's simple. If all of your competitors have a feature, you'll need it too. Because for the user, the lack of a feature can be critical to the non-use of your product. User research User research should aim to find out the user's reaction and willingness to use ...


1

I would lean to the xkcd.com "correct horse battery staple" example. You will bring in the concept of entropy; of calculation time and kids will have a fun time linking words together: "chocolate booger factory"; "mets rule yankees drool"; "teachers leave those kids alone"; and whatever else middle school kids can think of.


1

This is a very difficult task no doubt and I would agree most schools don't do a great job of presenting the wealth of options a student has to choose from. Here's my thought degrees vs majors doesn't really matter as much. You can do either one. What would help prospective students may involve creating similar categories to lump similar things together. I ...


1

If webpage is interactive then it drags user towards it. I recommend using words that interacts with users.


1

Currently working on "True/False" and "multiple selections" layouts for an elearning app & ran into this issue as well. The trouble with using "Check" and "X" is exactly as you stated, that you risk confusing the "correctness" of what the user selected with the "truthiness" of the chosen statement. You need to separately display 3 concepts: which ...


1

Working on something similar, we have found through analytics that an open course is primarily completed chronologically. If you tell a user they can't do something a certain way they will be discouraged. But if you allow them freedom they will by habit follow the same model that a set of rules would have imposed. Also, if content is created in a way so that ...


1

I like the grayscaling approach mentioned in some of the other answers. Here's an alternative approach for your consideration: Be up front about the change and explain to the users what is happening. Make a clear transition from the old system to the new system together. The implementation details of this approach may be: Show a screen at first launch ...


1

I'd totally agree with Scott's answer. You shouldn't use "deprecated" or similar, it sounds like those achievements are demoted and lost their value. You should "upgrade/promote" them as they will become unattainable. They shouldn't be hidden, but maybe another section for them should be created. It's like e.g. football(soccer) world champion of the past - ...


1

Don't show them. To keep deprecated features in a live product means to find solutions to justify their integration -as you are now doing-, to document them internally, to maintain something that is essentially useless. You are actually moving forward in time the act of planning and executing a final retirement of these features. Since the national ...


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