5

The cart should mimic the physical world. In the physical world, 2 hats and 3 shoes are 5 items in total. Therefore the cart icon should show as 5. If those hats come as a set of 2, they count as 1 item.


3

Would it not be useful for the user to have some sort of extra possibility to see more info about a product he or she is interested in? This really depends on what you are selling and what the user expects to know before going into the product details to purchase it. So for example, this would be useful to see available colors. Clothes/shoe sizes for ...


3

I've experienced ecommerce sites where after adding an item, a modal pops up that gives me the option to checkout or continue shopping. It's not entirely annoying since I typically don't add a ton of items but can imagine how it could be. Dictating a user's experience for them (i.e., forcing checkout) is a surefire way to get people to abandon. You could ...


3

If it is the cart they oppose, don´t give them one. What you do need tho is a way for the user to see everything they have selected, delete stuff, edit quantities or add stuff. That is in fact a cart, but you don´t have to call it that. Call it pre-checkout, or even just put the functionality in the checkout page. What you do need is a way for the user to ...


2

A blend between option A and B works. The pricings can just act as the subheaders for the time column. The visual representation using the different rectangles to give the calender is very nice and A can be tweaked further.


2

First of all, the two options you suggest don't offer the exact same information: with option A it is not clear that the prices are controlled exclusively by the length of the delivery slot. For example, one could reasonably assume that the pricing is based on the demand for the particular slot, which would also explain why each slot has its own price ...


2

Given the fact that picture sizes will then vary 4 or 5 times, this will make your design not so nice, as you will break some basic design rules as symmetry and order (list view), and visual height will be not levelled on detail view (as picture will take too much visual height / attention on different product pages). Another Contra argument can be that ...


2

Very good work from what I can see. Here are three suggestions with examples (examples are not 100% to the point) Suggestion 1: Instead of connecting the two separate the other third There are 3 steps now (and generally 3 is a good number) but you could translate that into 2 steps + summary. In that way, you could either change the colour of the card ...


2

Short answer Grey out is probably better than hiding, but only doing the one or the other is not going to solve the customer problem. Why are customers confused? Customers usually have preferred payment and delivery methods. They don't like if a shop doesn't offer their preferred methods (but still might want to buy). What confuses them is if a method is ...


2

There are numerous options: consider all these as different product, with different prizes consider them as a single product, but then, when it comes to prizing, you might get things more complex. Keep in mind that this is a B2B scenario, where the single piece won't make much sense. In case of the 2nd option you would need to have a price range on the ...


1

There's a fourth option: Shopping cart Modal Window It's an optimal solution for both desktop and mobile By having an independent scroll bar allows to view the total amount of items in the purchase keeping the same window height It doesn't leave the current purchase page Allows to include all the possible actions of a shopping cart in the window itself: ...


1

I think @Davbog has already provided a fairly comprehensive answer here, and I think the emphasis is really on the exact details you want to show. Based on the example shown here, I don't think it is actually necessary to show the details as additional information when it can be included in a filter option, since details like size applies to all the items ...


1

The answer here is : Test, test, test! However, as a standard, both Apple's and Material's guidelines recommend the search bar be on top, and this is what most users will expect.


1

Your lead question specifically asks if cancellation is a success or an error. It's neither one. Cancellation is simply something you should notify the user of in a neutral way. I didn't see it at first, but way at the bottom you mentioned there is a neutral "notice" option. It is the one you should use. With that, here are the 3 types of ...


1

When you mean shipping estimate there's 2 factors to consider. How soon and how much? (Also consider that free shipping is actually common among regional e-commerce stores) Some websites show these as USPs e.g. Free shipping above 40$, shipping within 3 days. While these are generic rules, they give customers assurance early in their journey on the online ...


1

Option 2 is better in every way... It looks nicer It allows for multiple item lines (with only 1 checkout button at bottom) It works better for desktop users who want to click with mouse It works better for mobile users who don't want an annoying keyboard to popup It keeps the "checkout" button out of the way, to avoid miss-clicks People know how ...


1

Personally I don't see a problem in navigation or interactivity, but in the design. Mainly the lack of contrast between the elements to be selected and the rest of the content makes them seem part of the same kind of information. I would clearly differentiate the info areas from those of interactivity, enhancing the second.


1

Here is an example from Walgreens. You could expand this approach and offer an expandable drawer for users to see the items they have currently added to the comparison list, before opening the comparison page. An additional consideration for mobile is the treatment of the comparison table in limited screen real estate. There are a few articles regarding ...


1

Q1) Would it be a nice user experience to add the global search button the top navigation bar of the product page? A1) It would be perfectly okay and necessary to place the global search button at the top navigation bar of the product page. It would provide a quick way for the user to go back to home page, especially for a first time user. Q2) Would it ...


1

How do you get measurable results? Run a usability test and measure the results. That said, I wasn’t positive from the question if it was the development product manager, the client you’re providing the page to, or your development colleagues who were opposed to UX testing. If it’s the paying customer, you do what he or she wants. One way to steer the ...


1

I'm not sure I'd agree with the "psychological comforts and conventions in having the security blanket of a cart." Users are used to it as it's the norm when shopping online, and it does have value to confirm all the items before receiving shipping info if that's being calculated on the fly. I'm more concern with: When a users selects an item to they go ...


1

I recommend going with the second approach or taking the user to the shopping cart page. Tooltips/ drop-downs might not be a good idea when a user has added multiple items to their shopping cart. A side flyout/ page gives more real estate space for displaying their cart contents. Also agreed with Martyn about tablet users. Here are two examples of platforms ...


1

Are bad UX and legitimate policy mutually exclusive? From a user standpoint I consider it part mildly frustrating and part extra typing practice, lol. I know it bothers others a good deal more than me but considering it's a one time* "nuisance" that takes only ~2-10 seconds I wouldn't even be thinking "bad UX" if you didn't use that term. Reactions will vary;...


1

Display on hover, in my opinion, works with scenarios where there's just one or a few previews on the page, not on a page where there are tons of preview links. There are a lot of subcategories and the user's mouse will hover over them on a frequent basis, there will be a lot of pop ups on the screen as the user move their mouse and that can get annoying. ...


1

I've seen this before, and personally I hate it. In my personal experience, I tend not to complete the trip or just leave the page. But maybe it's just me. However, no matter the reasons, you are cheating the user to do something she did not ask. Basically, you are denying one of the 8 golden rules of interface design 7 Supports the internal control locus. ...


1

It is important to keep the user where he is expected to be. Not all websites work like this but pages that go the extra step and allows the user to return to his initial state are a big plus.


1

On comparing A and B, I would choose option 'B' because of the better arrangement, good structure and concrete details. As much as I want the interface to be interactive, I also want it to be simple, detailed, and easy/quick to grasp.


1

For the "pack shot", you probably want to use "full-frame" images throughout (so both the 50ml product-shot and the 200ml product-shot would both be 500px x 500px images). This keeps things like a grid-layout looking consistent, and allows the customer to see all available detail (if the 50ml container was shown to scale, it would be a quarter of the size of ...


1

You don't always need to show the full-size image, but just having something that can be used as a reference should be enough. So instead of a full person, you can just use a hand or other references that have a reasonably well-known size. I think the issue is really having a clean product shot that you can manipulate graphically so it is not as much of a ...


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