182

As soon as the user hovers over the image add an overlay which enables him to hit the download button. This is just an example, you can make this more subtle but I think it will work good with your users current behavior. Since they will hover over the image to start their "right-click-workaround" and will see the download option. You should still have a ...


73

Do not do anything to the right-click. It's an expected behavior on the browser level. You know you shouldn't "hijack" the right-click or you wouldn't call it hijacking. Provide users with a better tool. If your users are essentially saving images themselves outside your app, your app must not be helping them save those images. Nobody wants to save ...


46

There is a reason why your user is not selecting download button and usability testing is the best way to determine why. However in case it's a matter of positioning the download button in a place a user might look vs hidden some where in the UI, the following options/examples may help: You could add a download button overlay image (in bottom right corner) ...


36

This task is already done through all major browsers. If you start throwing these messages into your web app your users will be frustrated. Imagine you're at a restaurant, the waiter takes your order, then 5 seconds later he comes back to take your order again. You'd be annoyed that he didn't act on your first answer. You'd probably get up and walk out. ...


31

Placing those icons upfront will create confusion and users might take wrong action (clicking on unintended row) because of the repetition. Think of using the vertical three dots approach and place the actions inside a dropdown. Keep the destructive action (delete) as last option.


29

Yes. Just speaking as a user, please provide me with a clue as to what to expect. I don't mind the extra 3 letters. Just speaking on my personal experience, I'm tired of pdfs opening in the browser unexpectedly. I want to know if it's a word doc or pdf. We are in the business of clarity and context, and providing users with clues about what to expect as ...


26

As a dedicated right-click-save user, I can say that I wouldn't bother with a download button normally, and I'd assume I saved the full version (and be mildly annoyed at the website if I found I hadn't). There are two issues here. The first is, your image isn't labelled (or doesn't identify itself) as a thumbnail. If it isn't, then I'm going to expect it is ...


22

I'd like to point out how Wikipedia does it. When you enlarge a photo by clicking on it on Wikipedia, you're presented with the photo, some details on it, and an unobtrusive "download" button. When you right click on the displayed photo, the "download" button is pressed for you, showing "Download original file". Though this isn't the best way to do it, ...


21

I would recommend not to put them directly next to each other at all to prevent mistakes. Downloading and deleting are two very different actions, happening with different frequency. I would make the click area for the more common download larger by including the file name in a link:


18

I spent some time exploring how other sites deal with downloads, and liked how Google Drive handles them. Here is a screen shot of two downloads simultaneously happening on Google Drive: What I like about this method: While this message box is similar to the Toast idea mentioned in Idea 5, the box is positioned on the bottom of the page, rather than the ...


17

There is no hard rule for this and it would be different in every case but I would recommend putting the task that you want your users to perform, or the task they they are likely to perform most, at the right-hand end of the row. 'Reading Gravity' suggests that this is the most likely place for the reader's eye to skip to after reading the file name at the ...


15

The User: Spends half an hour searching for the product. Finally finds it. Downloads it. Low bandwidth: it takes 10 minutes. Installs/starts it. ("Oh! I downloaded a downloader, not the application! Where is the difference anyway?") The downloader downloads. Low bandwidth: it takes another 40 minutes. The application installs itself. Result: The user ...


14

The question you should be asking is what is so different about your PDF's that they should be treated differently than other PDF's? Since a PDF can be anything, yours are not special. What is breaking the user experience of browsing the web these days, is that many websites treat links differently. There is nothing for the user to learn, there is no mental ...


11

Make deletion possible only on a selection basis I would suggest adding a checkbox for each row and an Action Bar on the top with the Delete button. This makes deletion possible on a per-selection basis, like so (my mockup of the changes): Edit this mockup on CodePen.io Pros, Cons and Other considerations Pros Deletion, which is a dangerous and ...


9

Android has an official guide from Google. And iTunes too So, to avoid Copyrights issues and all kind of related stuff I suggest to follow their guidelines.


8

Taken from the NielsonNorman website: It seems that if you have a PDF you want the user to see, make it downloadable - Don't make them view it in the brower, especially if it's a large size. Forcing users to browse PDF files makes usability approximately 300% worse compared to HTML pages. Only use PDF for documents that users are likely to print. ...


8

download [name of data] as [format] has many advantages. Here is why : Taking the user's perspective can help choosing between download and export : download is a word that focuses about the user's benefit because there is no ambiguity about the destination (the user's platform) and it will then be theirs. Moreover, virtually all Internet users have become ...


8

There are two important things I could read through: 1) 99% users do not have trouble 2) Explicit warning message is needed So considering both cases, you could go with Option 4, but additionally have a check box in the modal pop-up, that could say "I am aware of this. Do not show me this warning next time" or something of the likes. A regular user could ...


8

Idea 2: Small message banner next to button row is good for users not being interrupted with continuing their work if the download will take some time. If the download does take time (I've worked on apps with this same issue), having the message in close proximity to the action they just initiated allows them to see the system status w/o focusing elsewhere. ...


7

If possible, I would try to completely avoid showing the user the difference between server side and client side filtering. Will your users care where the filtering is done? Unlikely. So don't give them this unnecessary info. Better is to construct you UI in such a way that the first filter is always automaticaly server side then all subsequent filters ...


7

Lots of good answers but here is a KISS answer. You get the best of both worlds - fast load and render times and expected behavior. <div style='background-image:url("/path/01-thumb.jpg");display:inline-block;'> <img width=99 height=99 onmousedown='load(this,"/path/01.jpg")' ontouchstart='load(this,"/path/01.jpg")'> </div> <noscript&...


6

This is pretty common (from experience) - and there are a few common reasons: couldn't identify the download link didn't realise they needed to click the link but expected some magic to provide the file browser/user failed to click the link user got distracted "Oooh - look, a youtube video of cats" user found an alternative in another tab and downloaded it ...


6

It's difficult to answer this without a visual context of what the flow looks like at the moment, but one way to maybe work around this is to provide a zoom-in function on your image. When the user hovers the image, display the zoom-in cursor to invoke the user to view the full resolution image (in an overlay, load in a new page, or a new tab, maybe test ...


6

One option is to size a div to the same size as the thumbnail and use the CSS property background-image to supply the image instead of using the traditional <img> tag. This will make right-clicking impossible without hi-jacking anything. Additionally, make the download button prominent and easily click-able. After a few bouts of "Whoops, guess I need ...


6

You could try simply renaming the download button to something that lets the user know they will get a better version: "Download Hi-Res" "Download HD image" "Download full resolution image" "Download full size image" "Download original image" (though this one may have a negative connotation, they may think it's the image before adjustments). You may add ...


5

When sales gets in the way of good UX, you know you're in trouble! It's a common problem the digital world over. UX can't rule the roost entirely, as Marketing have probably already sold the idea with the expectation of bringing in extra revenue. Which, to be fair to them - from a purely sales point of view - is pretty opportunistic, and fair play. From ...


5

Downloading a file really doesn't need to be an obstructive action, so they've ditched the old dialog box. The old version was pretty obtrusive even though immediate action isn't strictly required: Really you only need to take action after the file is downloaded, there's no pressure. Particularly when downloading multiple files, the old IE's dialog got very ...


5

The same user may experience different cognitive loads depending on their goal When the goal is just to understand how long a download will take, a general sense of size is fine. "0.08 MB" will be understood as "a small faction of a MB, something quick to download" and this is low cognitive load. However in cases where people need to accurately understand ...


5

Imagine you have designed a music player and the play button icon represented the format of the song that will play when you click it, i.e. instead of the "play arrow" it had an icon representing the "mp3" format of the file. Would that make sense? If a button triggers an action then it usually makes much more sense to have the icon reflect the action. The ...


5

There are a number of reasons behind it Initial buy in : The small app size allows users to quickly buy into the experience of the app while downloading additional information in the background. If the user was required to download a large app to completely experience it, the chances of him installing or downloading the whole app drop significantly. I ...


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