Hot answers tagged

57

Various hotels I have come across (though I remember that primarily from China) had simple lamps with the respective do not disturb and please clean room signs next to the door and accordingly labeled switches on the inside of the room to activate either of the exterior lights. It cannot be used by anyone other than the guest. It costs somewhat more than a ...


54

I have seen indicators that are inserted into the key card slot so that keys can't be inserted until the indicator is removed. These solve the problem of being accidentally changed, since they are anchored to the door. Pros: The user is almost always required to be looking directly at the tag when inserting it into the door lock, so it is unlikely to be ...


41

This is a classic door design problem. Don Norman, the author of the book "The Design of Everyday Things", is quite vocal about door problem faced by users throughout the world. Interactive product design should address five basic principles of interaction: Affordances, Signifiers, Mapping, Feedback, and Conceptual Models. I'll give a brief intro to all ...


34

There is something called Paperless Signs like below While a passerby can still switch the action. Here the mode of turning the light on should be only available with the guest. I guess punching the room card/keys. Whichever sign you'll punch your card on the light will glow.


20

Sliders attached to the doors can do the trick. The material used will determine the options to fix them, their appearance and their longevity. This solution seems to be consistent with your two first conditions. Here are examples : Original wordings can then check your two last conditions. For example : on the left under half : "Everything is just fine. ...


16

Question 1: not only for when is broken, but also to CLOSE the door (unless it uses sensors to detect movement inside). Most users will automatically try to close the door and they won’t like a door that takes its time to close, specially when it’s the toilet door. Question 2: put the electronic button in the handle itself. Its sole presence will transmit ...


11

“Affordance” is one of those terms that has come to be used for so many different things that I’ve recently just about given up using it in order to avoid confusion. Affordance as possible physical interactions In the original definition put forth by Donald Norman (1988) in The Design of Everyday Things: The term affordance refers to the perceived and ...


9

A solution that seems to meet the requirements, but still doesn't seem great: a stiff piece of plastic with a profile like this: __________________|___________________ Top down it looks like this: [ Clean | Do not disturb ] You slide it under the door, with the appropriate bit sticking out. The vertical tab in the middle stays inside the room,...


9

The vast majority of single-occupancy public toilets (not cubicles with a shared space outside for handwashing and drying, but a single room containing both toilet and sink) will have an indication for occupancy. I have seen this in restaurants, on trains, and in aeroplanes. Very few such toilets (none, in my experience) will have closing and locking the ...


9

Why is there an (obvious) door handle in the first place? As already said, it's needed in case of emergency. How can the door handle be designs less dominant, or how can the automatic character of the door made more obvious? Not at all. Anything like hiding the handle, putting it in a less prominent position, making it smaller or less dominant by ...


8

It gives the car more symmetry which has aesthetical, structural and usability benefits. Aside from the symmetry there are some other benefits too. Aesthetical: Humans like symmetry, it's that simple. With a top-swing you can put one hinge left, one right, and the handle in the middle. And when opened the (a)symmetry is even more noticeable. Usability: ...


7

Revolving door traditionally revolve in the direction based on the locations driving habits. That is, right-hand traffic or left-hand traffic. In countries where right-hand traffic is the standard, revolving doors tend to rotate counterclockwise. This coincides with user expectations of "keeping to the right" even when walking down a sidewalk. Thus they ...


6

You could have a long U-shaped plastic tab that fits over the latch portion of the door, with one side of it labeled 'Do Not Disturb' and the other side as 'Please Clean The Room'. The occupant puts this over the door latch before closing & then locking the door. This should meet all of your requirements: hard to misuse - the side of the plastic ...


6

For what I can see, I think that the handle in the picture is not useful to open the lock, but just for pull the door. It is unclear why you should pull if it is automatic. How do you open the door then, if it is locked? Anyway, In this particular case, we would "nudge" users to push the button rather than pull the handle. We would then enhance the ...


6

To answer your first question: Why is there an (obvious) door handle in the first place? One possibility is that the train only had a manual door to begin with, hence the handle. The train might have been upgraded to get the automatic door opening functionality, and during the upgrade, they didn't change the position/design of the door handle and kept it ...


5

This almost-locked state is certainly not user friendly when you're not driving. However, when you're in an accident that causes the car to flip over a couple of times, it may cause the first door lock state to fail. If there was no second lock state, you would fall out of the car while it's spinning. In short: the semi-closed state is a backup safety ...


4

It is simply more convenient to open upward as opposed of outward, it can pose as a physical barrier preventing loading from the side and can be impeded from fully opening. Which small SUVs have a back door that opens to the side? There are a few design characteristics that, in our opinion, make a swing-gate less desirable than the liftgate alternative, ...


3

All doors need a mechanism to keep it closed. Otherwise it will be opened by wind, air pressure changes, vibrations, animals, kids, leaning, and so on. The door knob or handle is just a mechanism to open it up. If left out, like in the "public building door" for reasons Ivan Venediktov explains in his answer, then that door needs some other mechanism to ...


3

I think the answer is easy. For those doors that have the mechanism that shows occupancy - they are or need to be kept closed by default. Mainly airplanes and portable johns in the US. On the flip side if I go into my work restroom and the door is all the way closed I know someone is in it. It is really that simple.


3

Very interesting question. I have seen doors like this outside airplanes enough that I know they do exist, usually at chain restaurants. These locks are only necessary when it is impossible for you to see if there is an occupant inside because you can't see under, over, or peak through the gap. Otherwise the extra cost in hardware and reduced durability ...


3

As stated earlier, I think the title of your question is incorrect. Most citations referring to knobs offering an affordance of rotation are typically referring to knobs other than the ones on doors. Such as the ones on a radio tuner...which tend to have a lot more physical (and visual) cues as to how to interact with it (knurled 'grippy' edge, a tick mark ...


3

It makes a lot of sense to have auditory as well as visual cues as to when and where one has to exit, as some people cannot see that well, while others cannot hear that well. As to the sign on the opposite door: The view of the correct door might be blocked (especially when sitting (in a seat, wheelchair, etc)) People who are facing the closed door do not ...


3

How about a 'fridge' magnet? Have the available options stuck to the inside of the door, or on a wall near the door. Let the user stick the appropriate one to the outside of the door. For non-metal doors, a metal panel would need to be installed.


3

The usual solution these days is not to have a "clean" sign at all. If "do not disturb" is not displayed, the maid may knock and ask if the room should be cleaned. Some hotels, as an "ecological" (and cost-saving) option, will let guests preregister as not wanting full room service, or use various conventions for indicating this. They still use the "clean ...


3

I've seen a lot of doors that are nominally manual but that have a button for automatic operation for people who use wheelchairs or other devices to get around. Most people use the handles, but the folks in wheelchairs will push the button. You said the button is blue, which, at least where I'm from, is typically used for signs highlighting accessibility ...


3

The handle isn't doing nothing! It communicates the fact that it's a door, and that it opens left-to-right. That is useful information that enhances the user experience. What is bad about the design, though, is that it encourages misuse. Presumably, the user is supposed to tap the light to activate the door. The fact that there are two separate ...


2

This is a great question! It's interesting because it represents a design tradeoff. First, it's not the case that revolving doors are never clockwise. Wikipedia notes that "in left hand traffic countries such as Australia and New Zealand, revolving doors revolve clockwise, but door rotations are mixed in Britain". So doors are typically arranged to mimic ...


2

They sometime don't afford twisting very well Your observation is a good and nuanced one. Door handles are used frequently as cases in design texts because they can represent: A ubiquitous interface A complex, compound interaction (the knob must be twisted in one or another direction, and then the door pulled, pushed, or slid) Therefore, twistable door ...


2

Interesting question. I think that with this type of arrow, the left end represents the initial position and the right end the direction of the movement. The door opens therefore from left to right. Adding a bit of context (e.g. the door, the floor) to the arrow symbol could make it more intuitive: However, I think that this symbol is still a bit ...


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