17

I've always found "standard resolution" to be clear when speaking to people, but that is likely to change with time. It is important to know that "retina" is an Apple trademark and not a technical term for a resolution, so I try to avoid the term. Android is more specific by using the terms hdpi (1.5x) and xhdpi (2x or retina equivalent), so when speaking ...


12

I love this question, and I love that you asked it. Points given. I also think it's fundamentally misunderstanding how we approach to adaptive/responsive design - which is really not surprising since we're on a UX board and not a product design board. UX designers, almost by definition, aren't front end engineers. Because there's a bounty on this, I'm ...


8

There are lots of alternative interfaces Thanks to the minaturization of technologies there are a lot of alternative interfaces to the high-power LED/LCD/OLED screen in the markeet already. Voice input and input. The Amazon Echo device has a voice input/output interface capable of performing a lot of different tasks for users in a hands-free manner. ...


7

Both are perfectly valid options, so a lot of it will come down to the feeling you want a user to have when being greeted by the site: You are right that just the first name is a very personal approach. This is the sort of thing you find with a lot of voice assistants on phones; not only do they simply refer to you by your first name, they can also be ...


6

Your friend is probably right Assuming you actually want people to view the content, that's one of the worst places in the room to place a TV display. You not only have a staircase with (presumably) two-way traffic, but also a blind hairpin turn where traffic coming in and out of the main doors rounds the corner to climb the stairs. Adding a visual ...


5

You could use your described system (hiding every entered character after input) but still showing every special symbol as in dots, slashes, underscores etc. giving the user the opportunity to check the length before and after those characters. Further I think it would be ok to show the TLD. Additionally - since you are using a touch screen - you could let ...


5

In my opinion, in your scenario, the brightness should change according to the environment light, which is not necessarily related to the time of the day. The use of an automatic toggle option lets the user decide if the device decides the best brightness for him. This is good and could be both Opt-in or Opt-out. Another option is to give the user 2 or 3 ...


5

I would do two things simultaneously: add "you" to username (e.g. "John Doe (you)") - which would allow them to easily know which one is them - however not having any distinction between the other ones. use avatars. Then, as some of Users may have avatars unset, I would assign them something like Google does in Google docs, differentiating just colour and ...


4

The terms that I have been consistently seeing for an industry whole (not using an Apple trademark or the hdpi developer term) is HiDpi and non-HiDpi (non all lower case). When referencing HiDpi 2 specifically then the term is Ultra HiDpi (which is Retina). Remember that Apple is not the only HiDpi device manufacturer. Microsoft and others have their own ...


4

Both have pros and cons so ideally, you want to be able to display both: Current Floor: ideally scrolling. That way the user knows where they are as the lift is travelling. If you just have this, the user has no idea where the lift will stop next, causing potential frustration / anxiety and likely leading towards errors and/or wasted effort pressing buttons ...


4

Firstly, and unfortunately for you, I don't think the client has unreasonable expectations. What failed is the conversation between you and the client that voices those expectations. Most likely the client didn't know what they needed to ask for, which is where your expertise is supposed to come in (as the provider of development services). I might be wrong ...


4

Is mandatory in any email? I don't think 'mandatory' is the right adjective here. Who may have the mandate? Is this a good practice? For: More users will be able to see the email correctly (good for your business). Against: An extra line. Consider: Do you know the portion of emails that do not render well? Can you do this the proper UX way: A/B ...


4

Because smartphones are used outdoors... I suspect it is mostly fashion and showing off, as Koen Lageveen suggests here. However, there is a potential usability benefit. Smartphones are more likely to be used outdoors in bright ambient light. Bright ambient light tends to wash out colors, all other things being equal. If the color saturation were lower, ...


4

Assuming that there is a legitimate reason for having timetables separated for buses that are running on time and those that are delayed (I would argue that having all buses on 1 timetable and showing them in order of expected arrival time with delayed buses highlighted would make more sense) if there are no delayed buses, perhaps show a message that says '...


3

To me this is depending on two factors: The target group: For older / more serious customers I would probably go for Hello [First Name] [Last Name]. For younger / less serious customers I would probably go for Hello [First Name]. The websites goals: For some sort of sales website I would probably go for Hello [First Name] [Last Name]. For some sort of ...


3

When you say signal I am assuming you mean something like a waveform? If that is the case then doing an interface that shows the waveform with sections highlighted that the user can hover over/click on to get more detailed information would be something that makes sense to me as a user.


3

Your situation is one most designers/developers have gone through once (at least some kind of disagreement with a client). So don’t worry! This is a typical example of what’s so important about good communication between you and your client. Not just to get clear what your client wants, but let them be aware of where their wishes come from and what other/...


3

I work for a large electronics manufacturer and the move to better displays for industrial equipment is happening, albeit slowly. As suggested above, it was often an engineer who was left to design the display too. This was usually of secondary importance to the function of the device itself. That's starting to change in our company where new products often ...


3

Terminology commonly used for TV display's is the "10-foot" Graphical User Interface (GUI) Some colour guidance in http://www.cmsbuffet.com/Designing-For-TV.php https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ee418274(v=vs.85).aspx Notable highest contrast using solid white may not be best approach. Reds & oranges can be problematic.


3

It makes a lot of sense to have auditory as well as visual cues as to when and where one has to exit, as some people cannot see that well, while others cannot hear that well. As to the sign on the opposite door: The view of the correct door might be blocked (especially when sitting (in a seat, wheelchair, etc)) People who are facing the closed door do not ...


3

To answer the question, why are TV bezels there: they are there for a technical reason. It depends on the actual technology used, but in most current TV sets, the bezel contains the LED lightning electronics, which they don't want to put behind the screen, because then it would make the TV thicker. See page 10 of this document. Manufacturers tend to make ...


2

Natural pixel displays. That is where css pixels are directly equivalent to the natural pixels, i.e. the actual display density of the device. In a HiDpi display the natural pixel density exceeds that of the css pixel value, typically by a ratio of 1.33:1, 1.5:1 or 2:1. It should also be noted, neither relate directly to the css reference pixel. What ...


2

Interesting concept, although I don't know if I like it. Here a couple of things to consider Confusion can occur. What happens if there are multiple floors pushed? Does it show the highest number? If it does, what happens to all the other floors? That could cause some confusion, especially those who see it for the first time; they could think that their ...


2

There are some stats and an approach to study this issue in this article http://css-tricks.com/screen-resolution-notequalto-browser-window/ older stats over time here http://mentalized.net/journal/2009/02/19/size_still_matters/ from his original argument challenging a Jacok Nielson suggestion http://mentalized.net/journal/2006/10/24/...


2

The Apple Watch interacts with its user via vibrations. And the user can interact with it via voice (though the screen is still active for voice input). What I find interesting about the Apple Watch's interface is how it takes advantage of multiple interaction types, including, but not exclusively, screen.


2

Sure. The Altair was programmed via switches, and the iPod shuffle also uses switches only. No screens in either case.


2

The main reason is not UX related. The "displays" you are referring to in fact are not just displays. They cover a very broad variety of hardware ranging from simple PLCs with matrix LCD screens to full blown industrial PCs. The industry chooses for these options for a number of reasons, including: communication requirements with external systems (...


2

Mostly because of costs, and the software/hardware platform the thing is running on. A lot of the displays you see on machines, parking meters or other electronics run on rather basic hardware and software where you sometimes only have a few kB of Storage to handle everything, and it's mostly programmed in C or some language that is very close to the ...


2

Seeing that bright and colourful display and might cause you to think "wow this is a great phone I'm going to buy it". That experience and the moment of purchase is actually a pretty strong part of the user experience of owning something and very important aspect of the customer journey. Also, properly calibrated colours are usually a bit dull. If you don'...


2

It doesn't take a great deal of thought to start with creating a common pattern. It the current player's name is always in the same place on the screen then it doesn't matter if their opponent has the same name because it won't appear in the current player space: Something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...


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