27

I think Instagram relies on the concept of accidental discovery to try and get users to realize that double tap leads to Liking. IOS uses that extensively to show features and options to users which are often discovered accidentally . With example to why Instagram went for the option of double tap to like, I believe it is because the tap is the common ...


23

Affordance is related to the object itself. Eg: A button looks clickable. Discoverability is related to the product/solution. Eg: An image-manipulation toolbar shows all features it is possible to use when you want to work with an image. A physical example: If you walk down a corridor, then the affordance of the door-handles will "tell you" how it is ...


20

The problem lies in why the button was hidden in the first place. Presumably not for space-saving reasons, but for aesthetic reasons. This effectively rules out any visual representation on the device (otherwise, why not just put the button where people can see it?). The only options at that point are to draw attention to the button in other ways, of which ...


18

They're definitely different principles. Affordance aids discovery, but discovery isn't about the visual look and feel at all; it's not even about expressing what a single control does. Say you have a delete button, it's red clearly 3D, depresses when you press it, just begs to be touched, and has a big trash can icon on it with the word "DELETE" written ...


16

Fade out the edge that wraps (as well as leaving the button hanging over the edge so that it's clearer that there is more unseen content. Clearer because not only is what is off screen not visible but a little bit of what is on screen is not visible as well. Alternatively try and make out that it's like a conveyor belt or something that physically wraps ...


9

The press-and-hold (or long press) gesture on a mobile devices mimic the secondary button press on a computer mouse. It is supposed to give you the same alternative options as the secondary mouse click on a computer (even on Apple devices). From a UX perspective this behavior is kind of odd, since there are no clues that the long press exist on an object, ...


9

There are lots of ways to do this, but I would recommend against using an icon like the one you have chosen (which could be platform specific). The concept of more information is a bit abstract to represent with an icon that can easily translate across cultures. Option 1 If the information is to be shown in a overlay panel, then a downward arrow should be ...


7

For me, the approach you have used for having icons scroll along a UI item that looks like part of the keyboard (a real-world item) does not work. A keyboard in real life does not have a revolving panel, so the fact that you are trying to create something that looks like a real-world item, and then make it do something that wouldn’t happen in real life, will ...


6

I answered a similar question a while ago, here are some insights from the relevant part of the answer: The big challenge about keyboard shortcuts is to make them learnable and discoverable. The former can be addressed by following conventions and "mnemotechnics", ie. HJKL for navigation, F for "Favorite" and L for "Like" and for the latter I can ...


6

If the user is very likely to want see the more-info details you could find it worthwhile to go to a fixed master-child UI layout, similar to illustrated. This provides affordance and fixed positioning for data. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Note details area could be positioned at right hand side of screen, ...


5

If UI space is your issue, why not take inspiration from Jelly Bean's own minimal, and familiar, carousel indicator?


5

While writing the question, the obvious solution dawned on me: (from Design Downloader) A plus in a magnifying glass! But still, that just suggests zoom in, not out. This could be a problem if only one icon is used. Or what if it means "add search"?


5

I think the point is that this gesture is unobtrusive. It doesn't take up UI real estate or complicate the interface. Because there is general problem with discoverability (if that's a word) as there is no visual cue, it's best served for less frequent actions. Once a user learns this, it's like learning the right click. They never forget it and use it when ...


5

Add a discrete link in a secondary focus area (top right) This is how Gmail managed to remove the CC and BCC fields from their compose window. In your case it might look something like this: The location and wording communicate that this is not a critical element of the process, yet at the same time, if a user was to think "How can I add a subject/title ...


5

I have seen some apps use a brief animation that slides over, partly revealing the hidden feature, and then slides back to notify the user of the hidden features. This could be done upon first load or when a user taps on one of the list items. Previews like this avoid the interruption of a pop-up while telling the user that there are hidden features. As well,...


5

Interview / observe them, understand their behavior, then slowly uncover the commonalities. Use those to start uncovering their roles / groupings. Roles become apparent after the analysis of the data, not prior to interviewing.


4

According to CodeAcademy, potentials for interaction are collectively called the affordances of an object. The visual cues or other aspects of an object that a designer uses to indicate potential and intended affordances of the object are called signifiers. "The concept of 'affordance' has captured the imagination of designers. The term was originally ...


4

It isn't redundant. It's a function people already use on a regular basis. Don't over-think it. People are used to slide to the right, and people are used to see bullets on how far they have progressed. If you truly think it's redundant, than I would ditch the carousel, since I believe it's better suited for navigating to different destinations in your app ...


4

I think the suggestion @denislees offers makes sense. Also, by way of another example, below is how reddit (who require a title, but text in the message body is optional) does it:


3

I recommend to watch the video of UX9 about "The Story of the Ribbon" and download the slideshow. Its pretty interesting and you will gain some insights, that might match your creteria and furthermore you will get a lot of inspirations. They show an iterative design story and different prototypical UIs (menu+toolbar as well) A case study of context ...


3

I think option 2 will generally work best. People generally fill out forms sequentially so you'll run into fewer errors and you'll have an obvious field to flag with any errors. If you just don't like having redundant fields on the page, I recommend the pencil from 1 and a non-modal version of 5 (modals interrupt the workflow, take you out of the context ...


3

If we get out of the iOS setting, I'd suggest a scrollbar with a + inside a zoom icon where the ^ is and a minus inside a zoom icon where the V is. Just like google earth and google maps uses. as an added bonus, this also indicates the current zoom level. And it lets you instantly zoom to a required level by dragging the slider to a setting.


3

When your view first appears, flash the toolbar's scroll bar using flashScrollIndicators. This gives a visual indication to the user that the area is scrollable, without taking up any screen space. (This is a common iOS behavior and can be found in almost all apps, including Mail, Safari, etc.)


3

This is a really interesting question. It seems to me there are two contradictory alternatives here; which one applies to you will depend greatly on your product and business model. If there's no specific reason (e.g. aggressive introductory pricing) why those 80% of your users are generating such a disproportionately-poor conversion rate (especially if ...


3

I would personally use an edit icon like the following edit http://catalogus-professorum.org/extensions/themes/silverblue/images/icon-edit-grey.png This is your text By using an icon the users will know that there is an action associated with those contents, without having to interact with the mouse cursor. This solution works also on touch devices ...


3

From Wikipedia:, Gaver's named them hidden affordances : William Gaver divided affordances into three categories: perceptible, hidden, and false. A false affordance is an apparent affordance that does not have any real function, meaning that the actor perceives nonexistent possibilities for action. A good example of a false affordance is ...


3

Use multiple subtle cues to make the partnered stations look more important, e.g. not just color but maybe also a little bigger, with a slight glow effect, maybe a star shape or something special, etc. Don't put your logo on them. They already know they are using your service. Is there a way you can use the partner logos instead of or on the gas pump icons? ...


3

The Interview should be focused around deducting what roles the subjects fit into, rather than predefining it. However, if the is distinction in terms of the roles is important, you could screen the subjects based on multiple screening questions/survey derived from the desired roles you want to account for.


3

Working on similar thing The system ultimately needs to be used repeatedly in our service, so we are designing it with 'expert use' in mind. We know this will make orientation and learnability worse, but it's a trade off. If we introduce features to make it more learnable, we know from testing it makes it clunky for experts: slower! So what we did was ...


2

IOS made a clear choice to mimick a physical keyboard (or at least a discrete set of keyboard layouts). Notice that there isn't even animation when switching to numerical keypad eg. So either follow the behavior of the iOS keyboard: discrete fixed layouts with keys to switch to alternative layout with other keys. Or make your custom keys look ...


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