4

Hovering should be a "safe" action Hovering, or simply moving the mouse is normally a purely passive action, and doesn't typically get treated as decisively as other user input (except, perhaps, for detecting inactivity). Hovering is an exploratory action, and should be guarded as a safe way for the user to gain additional contextual information, ...


4

Design for the most common screen resolution in your userbase. If it's an internal company application then you can hopefully find out the various devices being used boy contacting the internal IT department. If it's an external application then you'll have to go by statistics available in that location. Sites like https://gs.statcounter.com/screen-...


3

From an UX perspective, having the file available with two clicks would be preferable than hiding it in a submenu a click further away. However, such menu doesn't get filled in a vacuum, and it may make sense to require an explicit action from the user to use those entries. Hiding them in a submenu lets the program to defer calculating them until the user ...


3

It depends on the visual awareness of 'profile completeness' to be useful to the users needs. I don't know the exact business domain you're dealing with, but there are some cases where there are useful attributes that aren't required, but are helpful to know (or at least understand what's not complete). Things like 'mobile phone' might be good to see blank, ...


2

Why not just use three input fields w/ a total? It requires the least physical dexterity, unlike a slider. It also affords the most precise input. You can use tab index so the user doesn't have to use a mouse if they are on desktop. It's a fairly common pattern (you often see this on budgeting and financial sites, when allocating adjustments to a portfolio)...


2

The 'best' practice in UI/UX design is to understand the user requirements and to support it through the interface that you present to them. But in general design tends to favour simplicity over putting too much information on the screen. One simple alternative is to introduce a user interface element that allows the user to switch between the different GUI ...


1

Don't know what tools or ui framework you are using but you can use collapsible areas like in the picture to show both version on same area without tabbed interface. Provided it is achievable in your ui framework.


1

Word merge the two styles, but the dropdown is a additional menu. When the selected option has few options, they use a dropdown, when has a lot they open a modal with the options. I think this type of design tries to reduce the learning curve for users. Using both menus can offer many paths to the user and become confusing. But if you want, you can perform ...


1

Your example shows the problem very well. If you put the filenames directly into the File menu, the File menu expands and shrinks. This may be confusing, as at first glance all of the File menu seems to have changed. The solution: indirection or fix the menu width and use ellipses (...) where there's not enough space for the whole filename.


1

Once suggestion is use the inspect too to look at a few buttons on different websites to compare the timing and easing in them. Normally for animation i'd follow the following When ui elements are entering the screen, use Ease-out animations For ui elements that are exiting, use Ease-in animations which are accelations The case you mention can be a bit ...


1

There actually is a really, really simple solution to this: adjust the location of the menu to ensure that it doesn't extend beyond the viewport. Here are three screenshots from macOS, showing a Finder window on the Desktop, which contains a single folder. I right-clicked on the folder icon to bring up the context menu. Note how macOS adjusts the menu's ...


1

Interesting approach is what Azure is taking, so based on that you should identify if user does a right click, and if so, the screen can be shifted left, on the right a full height side a panel might appear (with menu), which might then be closed. But pop-up can also be applied, which is normal on mobiles - but the basic web usually uses these context menus. ...


1

This is a very good question for which I have spent a lot of time researching. From my experience, it all comes down to immersiveness . I usually recommend and even insist on using the guidelines of the platforms we are designing for (e.g. Material for Android apps). I do this because the app will fit better with the rest of the system. Of course, you don't ...


1

Personally I think the other answer with input is a good option as it's more accurate and still pretty fast once the user gets used to tabbing (and shift-tabbing). Although I would set them out horizontally to allow for more sets on screen at a time. But as you don't like it, and you may have a valid reason not to (for example, no keyboard input), then my ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible