115

Should there ever be visible scroll bars (and why)? Yes there should. Visible scroll bars are an affordance "this page is scrollable". Without visual hints such as this the functionality might be missed.


103

Some modern design guidelines certainly disprefer persistently-visible scrollbars, but not all. For example, in the Material Design guide, for menus, if a menu is scrollable, it should show a scrollbar. In any case, if your content is scrollable, it should be clear from looking at it that it affords scrolling. It's up to an individual designer or guideline ...


62

As a mouse user, I abhor scrollable content that doesn't give me a view of and access to scroll bars. The scroll bar is a control. It allows me to quickly navigate large pages no amount of finger-scrolling, scroll-wheeling, etc. can compare with. It also gives me more precision for most pages than my scroll-wheel. The scroll bar gives me information. It ...


26

This viewpoint comes primarily from the Mac environment, where scrollbars are typically displayed briefly when content first appears, then fade out. When scrolling occurs (user triggered or otherwise), the scroll bar reappears. Only the handle is visible (as a semi-transparent rounded black bar); no arrows or gutter. If the cursor is over the scroll bar when ...


11

The removal of scroll bars in my view is another example of the idiotic and shallow ideology of putting style over functionality. This is back to front to how it should be and is indicative of the dumbing down of society to me. Scroll bars serve an important functional purpose that other alternative methods cannot always replicate. I think the change is ...


8

As a mixed point of view... Horizontal scroll bars are usually a bad thing. It may mean you've optimised for the screen width of a PC monitor, which doesn't translate well to mobile devices. When scrolling down, reading the entire page needs lots of left-right scrolls each screen of content. And conversely those sites will have wasted space on larger ...


7

Yes, scrollbars should be visible, if for no other reason than for the sake of accessibility. There are many instances where hiding a scroll bar makes your site/program anywhere between frustrating and borderline unusable: Using assistive hardware/software to access your page Using a mouse that doesn't have a scroll wheel Using a remote desktop system that ...


6

The general pattern is referred to as a "typeahead search". Typeahead is a feature of computers and software (and some typewriters) that enables users to continue typing regardless of program or computer operation—the user may type in whatever speed is desired, and if the receiving software is busy at the time it will be called to handle this later. ...


3

I think that's the right place to put a help button. You should either have the help button left-aligned Or move it to the top, next to the close button. Use the question icon. It used to be a standard


3

I'm so glad, somebody raises that question. It's Microsoft's fault that you have to write such a long question, because they created that inconsistent mess. Everything started with Microsoft making cross platform + touch input the top priority for Windows 8 and future Windows releases. That brang us a Windows experience that was consistent with Windows ...


3

A scroll bar is extremely useful it shows the user that page is scrollable it shows the user where they are currently on the scrollable page You have no idea how many times I was pissed and lost because some crappy designer thought that deleting the scroll bar is a good idea.


2

To add to MichaelS’ answer, On tablets and iPads, a non grabable scrollbar, that hides when not scrolling, is preferable. As he said, scrolling on touch devices is much more precise, and visible, grabbable, scroll bars are clunky and annoying. However, depending on the page length, a back to top button would be welcome. Also, whilst writing this on ...


2

To me, greyed-out list items mean those that are "of little interest" - in context that would mean references that are currently unused. You already have padlocks to indicate non-actionable items, whether or not they're used. Unlocked references should be removable. Consider how modern VS handles this - references are removable, regardless of whether or not ...


2

Reducing the opacity on hover, when done carefully, can deliver good UX. I believe the intention behind reducing opacity on hover is to make the buttons appear brighter. But changing only the background color signals disabled state. This can be corrected by making text and/or border darker at the same time. We're essentially increasing the overall contrast ...


2

You are correct that reducing opacity conveys a disabled state. Hovering should make a button appear more clickable, not less. If you want to convey a hover state with color, try the opposite -- aim for slightly increasing intensity. The normal-state button should look normal (not disabled) and its hover should be slightly more saturated and darker. It can ...


2

Changes involve frustration because users would have to repeat the learning process. Designing a more modern solution (without so much dialogue screen) Including interface operation via the keyboard If the company has the option, then maybe quantitative research might be useful? Is interaction required in each of the 7 columns? (e.g. Discount is not ...


2

Primary action to the right Some best practices recommend the primary action (default) put to the right. This also was a result of a survey by MeasuringUX. So when reading (from left to right) the last focussed spot allows clicking. The right alignment is also associated with "next" or "forward" movement, whereas cancel button put before ok suggests "...


2

In VS Code they refer to it as the Command Palette.


1

Digital buttons in UI are representations of their real world counterparts. Even tho the days are skeuomorphism are past(but neumorphism is making a come back), i find digital buttons should mimik real world buttons. Except there are no hover states in the real world. But we could use our imagination for what that would look like. what could be used ...


1

I normally take the approach of increasing the opacity of hovered buttons, my theory being hovering over the button is almost like pressing, and pressing would make my button go inward and have more shadow. Alternative justification would be that the cursor by being over the button causes a shadow itself. I've also seen the counter argument that the opacity ...


1

We have different types of buttons with a different language that they communicate. These actions are the CTA, primary, secondary and tertiary. On the other hand, we have common styles of buttons. This style is just an aesthetic point of view and not how this button should be used. These styles are solid, line and ghost, rounded, text link, floating action,...


1

Changing how apps function is usually a UX nightmare. The older the app, the worse it gets. Age is the defining factor of this issue and your sounds very old. This change could be a truly deep negative experience for a major portion of your users. If you have users that don't use computers elsewhere, this could be a life changer for them because it's their ...


1

To account for good User experience, you can indicate the references that are in use or not (the difference can be colour) and indicate those that cannot be tampered with (use of padlock icons as you've mentioned). However, you could also tweak the arrangement just like you have it in the sample picture that all unactionable elements, references in use and ...


1

The scenario that you have described can be considered as an event, which is not very critical (dis-allowing the user to use the application), but requires action (update database). Since it is not a critical event, you may have to allow the user to dismiss the alert box and access it again from somewhere. A very common, and well-established pattern of ...


1

I would suggest an in-app popup information [which is not a full screen modal] Many web applications use this method. Here are 2 examples:


1

An interesting question, my 2c coming from a developer but UX lead and also having designed interfaces with several internal scrollable areas. A few points: Visible scrollbars should exist if the content is large enough to require a scroll, as the presence of a scrollbar signifies and affords that the content can be scrolled. Infinite scroll is my ...


1

IMHO, choice 1 is bad. I work in IDE which does not reinstall the executable on remote server if it knows it's already there. If that file is deleted, any attempt to run/debug the executable fails even right after explicit "installing". Please don't do this. Edit: I mean that if your saved data is somehow deleted or changed outside your program. If I don't ...


1

TL;DR: Functionally, there should be little-or-no difference between top-level containers1 ("groups") and lower-level ones. However, it may be useful to allow users to give semantic labels2 to different containers, and – ultimately – to use those labels to affect how the UI displays containers and their contents. I think part of the problem is that notebook ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible