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6

Borders are only one way of showing that tables are "tables". Shading Another way, which I often use, is shading. This is quite common for rows - either two alternate background colors (one white, one non-white; or any two colors with sufficient contrast) or a series of colors (I often use 5 shades of one primary color as this makes it easy to ...


6

Does it fail any WCAG criteria? I don't think it would be a violation of any WCAG rules (surprisingly, I did run through them all in my head trying to think if one applied), but that doesn't mean you should do it. Tables without borders (as you have already indicated) are harder to read and consume the data from, it may also introduce accessibility issues ...


4

the easiest way to identify critical issues is to conduct a heuristic evaluation of your product, it can be done inhouse, a short article from the leader NN group on 10 principles of heuristic can be found at https://www.nngroup.com/articles/ten-usability-heuristics/ You could give each team member 1 or two principles of heuristics to test against and ...


3

First of all, do you really need to make it that clear? Even when people try to unselect the selected item, they only have to do that once to understand it is not possible. But if it is a real problem then a solution is to remove the selected item from the list and set it separate. Give it a prominent position opposed to the other options like so for example:...


3

This element is a vertical stepper Here's a Material UI reference as well.


3

Engineers tend to assess design solutions from the perspective of whether the product can be built or not based on project, technology and team constrains and what future work they will be performing so as to not get any surprises. Try the following: Setting the right expectations Maybe the engineers are going into the meeting with a "can this be built&...


3

If issues have arose in previous designs, it is best to perform a post mortem analysis to determine whether any involved parties had knowledge that could have prevented those issues, and then determine why they did not bring up those concerns. It is often the case that constraints are discovered as a project is being worked on, especially when there are more ...


2

It is all about how you can bring a better experience to everyone regardless of ability, context, or situation. How can you arrange and visualize the data in a better format that is easily accessible regardless of ability? The first step is to understand how people with disabilities use digital content. Many people believe that “accessibility” is just a ...


2

Whilst it probably won't tick the "fun" box, if you're looking primarily at the interface you could conduct an interface audit/inventory. https://bradfrost.com/blog/post/interface-inventory/ The goal is to identify and document the various components used in the interface and then assess whether they are used consistently and effectively. E.g. Is ...


2

"The goal is to identify critical UX issues, mostly by looking at the UI, and improve the overall look and feel of the product in the future." This sounds to me then as a case for Qualitative UX testing rather than UX audit. You could find couple of people that didn't worked on this product, and create them small assignment to test how clear design ...


2

I would make it a 2-step form: first username + password, then full name & e-mail ('To get to know you!'). This resource might also be of help: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/checklist-registration-login/


2

I checked in the Google Forms code but it's not really helping ha ha :D Some research I would go for a mix between utilites and the way it display. It seems to be an "Editor Toolbar" that floats and which is sticky to a certain position. I tried so search about "Sticky Floating Tool Bar Editor" by got a lot of noise in the result. Adding &...


1

I would recommend designing view mode fields as option #3 (remove border and background color). Keep the value/data as a simple text. Option 1 and 2 provide less visual contrast and may cause the misunderstanding of the difference between editable fields and not editable. Useful article: How to Properly Design Inline Edit Feature in Web Applications Related ...


1

I'm working The setup you describe requires two types of user feedback: "I've read your key" "Key OK" The former also signifies "I'm connected to the electricity and operational." First and foremost - consider accessibility. The visually impaired - or people whose attention is buried in TikTok on their mobile phone - would ...


1

I'll echo jazZRo and state that it can't really be answered for you. A simple way to test which would sit better with your target audience would be to design out both concepts–one zen and one exciting–and test those with people who fit your demographic. The test should be focused on the feel and perceived fit of the design to the content. This is largely ...


1

This is a general question so it's hard to provide specific answers. Many blogs and websites talk about the Feynman Learning Technique and I think it is a principle that applies when designers are communicating with non-designers (or for that matter, any type of communication between two people from different domain knowledge areas). In essence, it involves ...


1

I would start with a 2-step version and then a/b test different registration flows in the live product. Hypothesis to start with: By splitting the flow into two steps, with each step having a more specific purpose, the completion rate will be higher. Step 1: Essentials (email + password) Step 2: Welcome (enter name + pick username) Rationale for starting ...


1

Horizontal scrolling has accessibility problems. Infinite scrolling has accessibility problems. Combined, this could become inaccessible to a lot of people. However, there are accessibility-minded companies that are using this pattern in specific circumstances. Social media ads have employed carousels for a long time. They're ubiquitous on Facebook, and now ...


1

Given any type of design, there is usually at least one suitable use case, and I suppose this would be no exception. However, I cannot recall seeing infinite scrolling combined with horizontal-scrolling at section level except in enterprise level applications that have multiple large tables on the same page. This type of design probably breaks a lot of the ...


1

If you are thinking about doing a workshop with more people maybe you could use a miro board with screenshots of the screens you want to discuss. Attaching comments (for instance: user feedback) to each screenshot could help identify critical UX issues. As you mention you want to see the product in a fresh way I would also suggest having a look at the data ...


1

If you use the Material Design documentation as a reference, I think a navigation rail or a floating action button group would be closest to what you are looking for, but there are always new interpretations and adaptations to the core components described. Therefore, you will find that often Material Design requires some interpretation and adaptation ...


1

depending by your kind of project and the brand you are designing, here there are some: Ionicons (Free) https://ionicons.com/ Font Awesome (Both free and paid version) https://fontawesome.com/ Material Icons (Free) https://material.io/resources/icons/ Feather (Free) https://feathericons.com/ Open Iconic (Free) https://useiconic.com/open Streamline icons (...


1

Here's the thing: From my experience, if you get too attached to a fixed process and number of steps, you might start to feel frustrated because one of the steps might not fit what you're trying to achieve next and this might even hinder your creativity. It's good to have a process but also a lot of flexibility as to what should you do next to get something ...


1

I happens exactly the opposite way. User goals, and not components, drives the flows and screens. Start by researching what your user is trying to do, what do they need, what they are looking for, what pain points they have, user journeys, etc. Those behavior trends and product goals will drive your task flow and screen needs. Without this, there is no UX. ...


1

Let the user add an option to the menu, by defining the label (what the user sees) and value (what the system sees). Then, I think the most user-friendly pattern is to let them drag and drop the item into its appropriate place in the listing. In "edit mode", it doesn't have to be an actual dropdown menu. It might be a list of labels with drag ...


1

it's good to hear that you are putting in effort to gather as much feedback as possible on the designs at the beginning and also in the process. Good designs save time, cost and everyone's efforts in building products. However, engineers do not do critic designs. They are trained to make things work, and not deciding the manner which things will work. As an ...


1

I assume that selecting galleries is much more likely to be the main use case. And editing the selector is just a secondary use case. Therefore it is crucial not to compromise the main use case in order to provide a secondary functionality. Therefor I would suggest to have an edit mode. In edit mode the reanamig an reordering (by drag drop) would be the main ...


1

Most design systems or development frameworks have built-in notification or messaging elements, but often they are not configured or simply set to default values that may or may not be appropriate for individual contexts. A simple way to think about what 'best practice' should you, you can consider these different types of common messages that are generated ...


1

Popups are a poor UX choice in most cases, and even more so for capturing user input beyond a binary button press (Yes|NO, CANCEL|OK, etc). "Popup Pyramids" get created by careless design that doesn't think beyond immediate needs, doesn't consider the wider ecosystem within which the app will exist. Popups demand the user re-orient their ...


1

I have various devices where the screw is an ADDITIONAL securing method. In an all adult household you then just leave the screw out.


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