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32

No. Those are two fundamentally different jobs. Except in the scenario that the UX design is for a product the primary purpose of which is OOP development (e.g. an IDE). Otherwise, of course, there is no harm to knowing the "principles" of OOP. Further, knowing about a broad range of different things (including OOP) can certainly help you to think ...


17

I think your fellow developer is somehow correct. To be honest, as far as I know there's no "set in stone" rule for this, so nobody is right or wrong as an absolute. However, depending on implementation, you may end with browsers rendering your font as integer numbers. Which isn't a big deal on modern screens, but some older screens will start to add ...


14

Perhaps not so much learning the principles, but understanding the principles of Object Oriented Programming or the equivalent does help with some aspects of UX design. The short answer would be NO (i.e. it is not crucial), but the long answer would be YES because by developing a process that helps you articulate the relationship between different entities ...


7

Sans fonts, which are commonly used on screens, are mostly designed to have the same thickness of stems and bars. When the font size is quite small and is odd, like 17px, the font renders in a way that the bars are about 2 times thinner than stems. Such rendering badly represents the actual look of the font, and that's why there are recommended font sizes: ...


7

This is based more on a very psychological perspective (number psychology to be precise) than it has to do with designs or programming or any other thing. Even numbers sort of has the calmness and the 'I'm not doing something awkward or out of place' feeling and has over time been been employed as the standard font sizes across various devices and platforms ...


5

As someone who works as a designer and knows OOP languages, I think some of the philosophies of OO kinda help with understanding structure, particularly if you're getting into SCSS and modularizing your design to create reusable chunks of content. But that's not really OO, but more understanding of variables and basic programming concepts (like keeping it ...


5

I'm a web developer and darn good at what I do. I once applied to a mechanical engineering company to re-build their lousy web site which was originally created by a mechanical engineer part-time. To get the job, I had to take a mechanical test. Most of the things on the test I had never even heard of before much less knew how to answer. (It mostly tested on ...


4

There is utterly no (general) reason why even-number sizes will look "better" than odd-number sizes. How these numbers correspond to the degree to which stroke widths and positions line up naturally on a pixel grid (vs needing ugly hinting or subpixel positioning) is completely font-dependent, and in a modern web context where px sizes are not even ...


3

I feel like there are many valid reasons for this design decision. You already stated one by yourself: docks and other accessories wouldn't really work with the port being on top on the phone. Another thing that comes to mind, is that electrical sockets tend to be placed relatively low (As stated here: Example1, Example2 - might vary for certain regions, ...


3

Wow, a satisfying thread. There is often a debate in modern society - should a designer be able to programming? Personally, I think that knowledge of programming patterns or concepts (OOP) is necessary to become a high-class designer. Why do I think so? You can model the database in cooperation with a back-end developer. (Creating models) The design ...


2

The plane symbol is indeed a bit confusing. Keep in mind that symbols/icons are often interpreted differently by users, it is therefore good practice to combine it with a label. With regards to your questions. What about a green dot? You can even make it pulsating if that is not too distracting. Combine this with the text 'in progress' or 'active'.


1

I don't agree with the answers, especially with the one that has most votes. It is 2019 outside and the industry is developed enough to blur the borders between the roles. In short, UX Designer + Programmer = UX Engineer A role description from Google Jobs: As a UX Engineer, you’ll weave together strong design aesthetics with technical know-how. ...


1

Other answers have basically said "no, but there's no harm in knowing it". I'd like to challenge that and suggest that not only do UX designers not need to know OOP principles, but they should not do UX design from a perspective of having been freshly exposed to OOP principles or long-term infatuated with them. UX design has nothing to do with OOP, but it's ...


1

One thing I would add to this conversation is that UX designers should also understand how a webpage is marked up as well. Too many designers don't realize that divs are containers, that one can move containers around but one can't readily pull these containers apart. This lack of understanding often comes up when discussing media queries and break points. ...


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