26

Personally speaking, lean UX is not a type of UX strategy, it is more like the business strategy which accommodates the fundamental UX principles. In UX Design you Design -> Prototype -> Validate as is, but when you do this in sync with other development units in the organization, it becomes lean UX. Anyways, here are some of the links/books/what-have-you. ...


23

You've somewhat discovered the answer to your own question. The best time to include development in the design process depends on the development team you are working with. Your initial intuition is correct...get the developers in sooner than later. Ideally, they are a part of the design process from the beginning. They have insights and ideas that can ...


20

First things first I don't think UX can succeed in this scenario. A sprint is too short to do both the design and execution of the same feature. You should be out in front of things with the Product Manager defining the work before it ever becomes an engineering request. If you take that approach seriously (which I've never been able to realize 100%), you ...


20

The Sharing Mockups stage is too late Assuming you want the developers fully engaged and understanding the reasoning behind the design and decisions made then you should have them in a UX Design Workshop - before mockups are done In my typical workshop I'd Explore related User Stories Itemise concepts user will be thinking about Do multiple UI ideas that ...


20

A portfolio is not simply a catalog of work you've done for previous companies. Here's a quick definition of a portfolio from Wikipedia: Career portfolios serve as proof of one's skills, abilities, and potential in the future. Does this include sample work for other companies? Of course. But there are issues with basing your entire portfolio on previous ...


14

The Fussy Logic of Infinite Wicked Problems Yes, it means all of what you say. There is no exact answer or way to know your solution is final. A wicked problem is a problem that's impossible or difficult to solve because of contradictory, incomplete and changing requirements that are difficult to recognize. The thing with design and Wicked Problems, is ...


11

A "Stopping Rule" is a mechanism for deciding whether to continue or stop a process on the basis of the present position and past events, and which will almost always lead to a decision to stop at some finite time. The most obvious example I can think of would be the winning condition for a card game. In the game "snap", the game continues until only one ...


9

I think there needs to be more clarification on this concept in general. Even reading some of the comments so far I’m getting confused when UX within Agile is equated with Lean UX. There's a gap there that isn't really addressed in most content on the subject. And I imagine that's just because it's a challenge in general for which I'm not sure there's a ...


9

Hiring a UX designer is great first move: you focus on the user aspect, on his needs, on his behavior, on his expectations, as a website user, and not merely as a website viewer. That's a good decision. You're definitely not back to square one. The UX designer showed you that you need to introduce a level of abstraction in your interface. Users don't care ...


9

I had very similar experiences to yours (and also been using JIRA for quite some time now). It goes: User stories are extremely limited It seems that every Agile team fails to understand or work with user stories. But for a good reason - a user story capture only a tiny fraction of the problem domain, here's just a couple of things user stories don't ...


9

A CRM appplication is usually a lot of dashboarding with many and sometimes all the information/action about your user on one screen. I've worked with CRM apps which need browser on fullHD screen I believe mobile first is wrong in that case for UI.But you should design all your backend API to be small and modular enough to be able to (query, request, change) ...


8

Storyboard A storyboard is used in UX to illustrate a sequence or flow of events. Usually this means a flow of screens (e.g. login, then home page, then create post page, then submit post, etc). But storyboards are also used to illustrate behavioral and business flows (e.g. for a restaurant app, a behavioral storyboard might include I want to go on a dinner ...


8

The main advantage of "mobile first" is that it forces you to narrow the app to its most essential features. You simplify the IA and the interactions. Then as you design the desktop version each additional feature has to earn its way in. You have to carefully scrutinize whether the desktop features really need to be included. Therefore, I'd say that a "...


7

There is a saying "don't listen to your users, watch them", perhaps first suggested by Jacob Nielsen here. To design an easy-to-use interface, pay attention to what users do, not what they say. Self-reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behavior. If you search for "don't listen to your users" you'll find other ...


7

Test it That's all there is to it. Every feature has to have a purpose. Clearly state the reason behind this terrible thing marketing did and identify a way to measure it's impact. If it fails the test, it has to go. That's just good business. Choose the right metrics Kerry Rodden at Google Ventures developed the HEART framework to assist in determining ...


6

Great question. I'll try and break it down into a couple of components of how to provide the holistic view and task management (and reference Jira documentation when I can). From what you have described, a user story to handle the 'bigger picture' thinking is called an Epic. An epic is essentially a large user story that can be broken down into a number of ...


6

According to Bill Buxton "We are NOT all designers", although "we are all potential participants in the design process", but design is "a profession as reach as math or medicine" that cannot be performed without experience and knowledge. Although the designer must process and evaluate all possible contributions, the final design is the designer's role and ...


6

The short answer Based on the definitions provided, the reason why a wicked problem has no stopping rule is because typically you can apply a stopping rule to a problem because there an acceptable or optimal solution exists which allows you to come to a point where there is no need to continue searching or iterating on a better solution. The long read I ...


5

When you wireframe first, you are defining a solution before you know what you are trying to resolve. You have to define the problem before you know how to design the solution. Hence, requirements state what a product needs, not the solution. Also are your wireframes literally ideation pieces for discussion, or are you striving towards fully functional ...


5

Nouns are Objects Most likely Nouns in this context are entities which exist in the task domain. I see direct parallels between Noun and Object in OOP terminology. An Object incapsulates attributes and methods. Noun contains Attributes and Actions. For visualization Noun use Views. So the Nouns are abstraction tool which is convient for analysis of some ...


5

Answering this question is hard because we are not you and we don't know what you do and how, so assuming that the steps you posted are the steps and order that you follow, then that is the right answer. But, less assume that you want to change that aspect of your communication with your clients, not necessarily change your steps, although a little change ...


5

straight away. For various reasons: they can give insight that you would never get from anyone else; can flag technical limitations very early; become emotionally attached to the project.


5

You need to elicit requirements for the web app you're planning to build. This is essential part of software development. Many projects fail because of incomplete requirements. According to this study where 8000 projects were surveyed 1/3 of the projects were never completed and half of them partially with considerable delays. The major source of problems ...


5

Implicitly what you are talking about is 2 things Corporate Commitment to UX If company serious about UX then they will commit to involve UX in early inception and evaluation extend any UI libraries used to support key UX rework inadequate UI solutions out of product Action: you need to have key coordinating managers understand this. They should ...


5

Every designer can empathise with alot of the problems you're having. Implementing the designs properly Problem "Developers create something that isn't quite how it was imagined by the team during our brainstorming session. Designers become frustrated when last-minute revisions muddy up their spotless layouts." Here are some activities to help ...


5

A wicked problem is so large and universal that it is presumed to be impossible to ever really solve; it's simple to define/describe, but exceeds human ability to scope. Homelessness is often considered a Wicked Problem, but it's really not (just... give people homes. It's difficult. Not impossible.) Cancer is probably a wicked problem. Pollution has become ...


4

There are many ways of collecting user feedback. Asking for opinions about the product is one way to get feedback, which is often called "self-reported usability feedback" (or "self-reported usability survey"). I understood that your question is related to that kind of feedback, which is not particularly bad as long as you analyze the results in context ...


4

The UX process needs lots of variables working in parallel for the best outcomes. The visual design can influence the interaction design, and the interaction design can influence the visual design. So as long as everyone is staying flexible and willing to go with the flow, it doesn't really matter where you start as long as everyone is willing to accept ...


4

You are blending two distinct concepts here: The development of ideas and the propagation of ideas. The examples you have listed were all developed through a great deal of user research over many decades of interaction design. "Swipe" and "double click" did not emerge out of the ether, they were developed by industry leaders through an iterative process of ...


4

Notes from chats with developers kov in irc://chat.freenode.net/#epiphany wrote: grahamperrin, it was based on personal preference and workflows, if I remember correctly; … and myself were explaining how we use page titles to quickly find a specific tab while cycling through them … … my recollection was … arguing with aday or mccan that we used it to ...


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