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57

If your app loads instantly, then don't add it. Especially not when it creates (forces) an completely unnecessary delay. Splash screens just serve the same purpose as loading spinners: giving the user the reassurance that their action was seen and is having an effect, plus subjectively shortening the time it takes to load.


36

Management is principally seeking brand recognition. The same desire drive Coca-Cola to put their logo on everything they can buy. If the app, when running, has a visible logo of the product or company, then you should be able to make the case that brand recognition has been served. You could probably make the case that it's better served that way, since ...


27

There are situations in which adding a delay will help in building a 'trust factor'. While the conventional UX wisdom dictates that faster feedback is better, sometimes, it is better if you slow down the thing to a level at which the user can imagine the things happening. Here is a Hacker news thread touching upon the same conversation: Locksmith gets less ...


23

I am very surprised this comic hasn't been mentioned in an answer already. Admittedly, the question is asking about a short delay and these sources come from the era when every 'hip' website had a 'super-cool' animation which wasted 30+ seconds of your life (and bandwidth) for no good reason. Courtesy of The Oatmeal (crude humor warning) and idea inspired ...


13

Time is only one of the factors that affect whether an app feels responsive. However there are decent guidelines that give you a rough idea of how people perceive response. Jakob Nielsen has written a good article on Response times that I use as a rough guide. It states that: 0.1 second is about the limit for having the user feel that the system is ...


8

One idea would be to add an animated transition between the questions. Tapping an answer would slide the next question in view (or turn to new page?), and no touch events would be of course registered during the animation.


7

I believe the term is hover intent. The idea is that you want to try and predict the intended behavior, rather than perhaps the literal behavior. This is done by pausing slightly before committing to the hover. Your example is good. Another typical one is when nested fly-out menus were popular (or perhaps 'abused' is a better term) and a user may want to ...


6

Hide the Yes/No buttons or replace them with a "loading..." indicator/graphic until the next question and image have fully loaded. This way the user will know that they can't answer the question yet because something is happening (i.e. loading the question and image). It can also act as a feedback mechanism. Once the Yes/No buttons "vanish" for a couple of ...


5

I agree with other posters that you shouldn't have a splash screen for an instantaneous start-up. A splash screens is an admission that the program is frustratingly slow to load. However, if your management still insists on it, a suggestion is to load the splash screen over the initial window and immediately fade it out, taking no longer than two seconds to ...


5

The delay is due to the fact that since the flight information must be up to date both price-wise and availability-wise and not based on a cached database, as web search engines do, the server must contact multiple external services - those of all the flight companies to get up to date info, thus the delay. The chances that all of the results for your ...


4

Throbbers are also known as 'spinners' or 'loading indicators'. Throbbers can be used to indicate progress on long actions/waits which meet some or preferably all of these characteristics: The action/wait is blocking user flow. That is, it's difficult or impossible for the user to proceed with the flow she is on without waiting. e.g. The user asked a ...


3

Users are human and humans trust things they are used to and fear the unknown. 10 years ago it may have been the case that all apps start slow but the ones that do it with a splash screen felt better to the user so users were more comfortable with a splash screen that is shown for a few seconds rather than without it. Today a good portion of apps start ...


3

It's entirely possible that your correspondent has seen that many applications have a splash screen and thought that it's actually necessary, rather than thinking that users need to see something happening and that's the best way of loading the application (in the background, while they look at something prettier than a spinning hourglass or whatever). In ...


3

I would see it in the same light as any other animation that I might be using on an element. Be it a pulsating effect or a grow/shrink effect, or in this case a hide/show animation (coupled with a bounce effect). The advantage of a perfectly implemented animations are plenty and quite useful in UX, as pointed out in this Smashing mag article - A New Mobile ...


3

My 2 Cents: From a developer Point-of-view it is "plain stupid", But as a business decision, it is "Genius!". Consider this hypothetical situation: You go to a fortune teller, Ask: "when will i die?" It instantly answers: "5th, June 2049" No crystal ball, no humming, anything... ? what would you think ? Example of an instance of intentional delay: I know ...


3

I think the answer is YES. 2) This is because in the real world when you open a door or move an object everything happens immediately without delay. People are accustomed to interact with physical objects and get immediate feedback of the state of the object (if you pick up a rock you see immediately what below it). When people browse the internet they ...


3

Often, but not always. Actions that are meant to be taken multiple times, daily, are best to be as fast as possible. There are various situations where a delay might be beneficial in some way, like increasing trustworthiness of the output to the user, or even the value. Coinstar is a great example of this. The machine is able to calculate the total ...


2

Responsiveness is more than loading content or list items. Make sure you give the user feedback when interacting.. This can be the button looks 'pressed', a sound, animation, vibration. The important thing is to make sure the user knows what's going on(that it is loading) This will greatly increase their patience in waiting for your app..


2

Since you have no start-up issues to hide from the user, the splash screen is just marketing. Speak to your sales and marketing team and ask them which is better, a branded splash screen or an app that loads faster than all of the competition. Hopefully, they will see the value.


2

On one system I worked on, a predecessor had added a 500ms delay to an AJAX response. I asked why and learned it was because the results came back so fast the screen often just jumped and it felt strange. I added that to my bag of tricks and think it's a reasonable application of a forced delay. As a student of Dan Ariely, I learned that thinking rationally ...


2

In general, I think that splash screens are only necessary if the application actually takes some time to load (I'm thinking of programs like Adobe Photoshop). Because splash screens have been so commonplace, users might come to expect it. I could see the argument that splash screens make users feel "comfortable." What I think could help mitigate that, ...


2

When export is time consuming, it often is the output generation processing that takes time and not the data selection. You may be able to break the process into two steps: Snapshot the data: the system could quickly (order of 100ms) gather a consistent snapshot of the report data into temporary tables. You can then let user proceed. Generate the output: ...


2

(If the export is taking a minute or more, I would consider analyzing whether the method used to build the file is inefficient. This may be a good topic for you or one of your engineers to cross-post on Stack Overflow.) The export should contain the most-current content from the data set. I would implement a step in export: When they click [Start], perform ...


2

Don't solely rely on a delay! As you have already experienced, there isn't really a good value that makes the delay technique exhibit good UX. For some users, this delay will be too short, and for others, it will be too long. Break out your protractor Instead, you can use some simple math to calculate the coordinates at which you should perform a menu ...


2

Have you seen this in any production apps? (That is to say, I guess you'd have been on the development team - as you wouldn't necessarily know about it, I guess, as a user!) Yes, I think most of us have probably also done this because they like to see their clever little loader... but then move on. A loader should IMO only be used when something takes ...


2

Good idea, indeed. The whole idea of a Spinner is to have the user know, there's something happening in the background so they will need to wait until it's done. Especially in the case of a network connection, Spinners have been required since the reception of the network as well as the speed cannot be determined and is subject to change. Networks also ...


2

It is risky to say 'always' when it comes to user behaviour. I think the issue here is that the definition of instantaneous might vary depending on where the delay happens in an user interaction, because if you were simply navigation the user interface then the focus or hover over behaviour should be immediate. But if you were to click a button and some ...


2

It's proportional to the decision making time. when browsing through photos, one would expect no delay. The brain is super-efficient with images. when answering questions, one would expect a simple, short transition, mostly as a visual confirmation and acknowledgement. Same principle applies to how complex the question is. For simple "Yes" "No" ...


1

In the comments, @RedSirus led me to the following term: hysteresis the lagging of an effect behind its cause the dependence of the output of a system not only on its current input, but also on its history of past inputs a retardation of the effect when the forces acting upon a body are changed Wikipedia says: The field of user ...


1

Just keep the user's expectation in mind: In this case, the restart seems to be the user's choice. Therefore, he'll expect the server to be unavailable for a while. To make the current status transparent you should tell: What's happening right now ("We're restarting your system now.") How long this should take ("This usually takes 10 to 15 seconds.") If ...


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