8

If there's some usage statistics available for your users, something like the 80/20 rule or Pareto Principle is a general indicator of where you should be focusing your efforts. It is a more objective way to show the stakeholders that perhaps only 80% of the users (or whatever the figure might be) ever view or edit 20% of the fields, and therefore spending ...


8

Is it worth it to add some gamification? Yes, but do some research first. Gamification done poorly can backfire. In the links below, each one describes successes AND failures. I don't think you'd ask this question if you had already dug deep into gamification, so let me share a few of the resources I enjoyed: Online Classes The online classes I've ...


7

Imagine you were shopping and whenever you tried to leave a store, one of the sales people blocked your way until you had told them that you weren't interested in what the store had to offer and were sure that you wanted to leave. That is the real world equivalent of popping anything up when a user tries to leave a site. The one exception is if the person ...


6

Interesting question! I have always (absentmindedly :P) emphasized the labels and this finally made me look into the matter as I am UX Engineer myself. This is what I could gather and these are purely based on my research and hence might not be credible. But as a user, here's why I felt labels need emphasis: Need for focus Every screen needs to have focus ...


5

This is indeed a matter of phrasing. What you need to know is biological sex, not gender. Gender is personal, a sort of sense of self. Biological sex is what others have assigned you when you were born as a method of classification. Since this would be for medical purposes, use biological sex. Gender at birth would be confusing to some, as there are people ...


5

I agree that option A makes the most sense. It provides a clear path focused on a single user at a time. After the main cardholder completes their information, a notification of some kind could request similar information for the extra cardholders. This way the user experience of entering information would be the same whether it is the main or extra ...


4

It is hard to answer your question without having more details. However, when it comes to the approach to this task, I think that Maeda's SHE may be a good principle. As Maeda says, "the simplest way to achieve simplicity is through thoughtful reduction". SHE is one of the ways to get there (even though there may be various interpretations): Shrinking ...


3

The following are worthy readings about this matter. (1) A good article to start digging and understanding gamification for business: The Evolution of Gamification in the Workplace, by Sharlyn Lauby http://mashable.com/2012/06/15/gamification-business-evolution/#48Neotarzsqb (2) For those looking for a deep knowledge about gamification at working places, ...


3

Here are two great starting points on GDPR, UX & Marketing that i have found helpful myself: GDPR: 10 examples of best practice UX for obtaining marketing consent This article contains key UX focus points, inlcuding UI suggestions. Giving detailed insight into how to present the 'information management' options to users: Unbundled: Consent requests ...


3

I was reading through the regulation itself and opinions on it. I was thinking that by the end of my inquiry I can come up with UX guidelines. Nope, did not happened. Here's are my takeaways: You need a lawyer You should listen to legal people of your organization on this issue. They should be accountable for interpretation of the regulation. The fine ...


3

I guess from DB perspective, normalization will come to your help, and you will certainly have guidelines which are focused on performance and other tangible factors. I would instead draw your attention to the target users. When you mention that users are demanding for many fields vs stakeholders are demanding. You'd want to make an educated decision in ...


3

To build on Michael Lai's answer, here's some additional info on the 80/20 rule from Universal Principles of Design: 80/20 Rule - A high percentage of effects in any large system are caused by a low percentage of variables. The 80/20 rule asserts that approximately 80 percent of the effects generated by any large system are caused by 20 percent ...


3

There's always ambiguity to a numeric scale, e.g. is DEFCON 1 or DEFCON 5 the most heightened state of readiness for the military? (Hollywood often gets this wrong, by the way) A class 1 cleanroom is cleaner than a class 10 clean room, but a BSL 4 lab has more safeguards than a BSL 3 lab. Outside of cases where the numbers correspond to a very specific ...


3

I think this is a case where user research would be of valuable information where you should actually have a discussion with the different user groups and see what is the exact information are they looking for and what the cases where they want to dig down to the granularity of data. I have in my experience generally found that users usually want access to ...


3

Labels have more weight because people don't read information, they scan information. If you would scan, what would you scan for: a) Pasta Alfredo, Spaghetti Carbonara, Spaghetti Bolognese b) Noodle dishes You would go for option b if you would want to find your desired option as soon as possible. When designing forms its exactly like that, you scan ...


3

Labels are emphasised because they are more important to users than the value itself. Users are scanning for words in labels that tell them what the form is for and what action is expected of them. They are mostly interested in simply completing the form as quickly and effort-free as possible. In order to do that, they scan - not read - for anything ...


3

A very similar question can be found here: Handling gender in statistical test data. Unfortunately, by asking for someone's biological sex and not the gender, you cannot avoid causing discomfort for some people. However, if you explain your reasoning on why you need to know what was assigned, rather than what a person feels their gender is, you can get the ...


2

I agree with all of the answers here. I want to add another option you can consider based on option 2: Build modular content/data blocks. As the pain-point seems to be on the creation of assigned custom dashboards, can this not be dictated by the user? I recommend providing universal access to all content to start, then create a way for each person to ...


2

According to both earlier answers I suggest that using a combination of color patterns and numbers may be a right solution. As @Peter said: Additionally you can use colors for the different states. Colors are perceived faster than text. You can use a traffic lights color state to indicate the high, medium and low states of the corresponding value of ...


2

Does registering add value to the user? Personally, my recommended path for apps is: Provide immediate value to user, even if the value is limited Add more value when a user registers Make sure registering is as simple as possible (username/pwd or social login) If you want to collect more information about users (such as asking them to complete an account ...


2

Users in shopping mode tend to be rather passive, so I wouldn't require more than 1 click. A simple, small textlink saying something like "This listing is missing information" in a corner of the product view would probably not alienate your third parties, but it would get you the data you need to point you to the content you may want to review. Clicking ...


2

I think your next step here should be focusing on the improvement of the current features. If you have already discovered that "most calls point to issues that could be solved by improving current features, rather than introducing new ones," then adding new features doesn't make much sense here from a UX standpoint. Instead of wasting your, designers, and ...


2

My take on this problem would be: Provide a list to select one/multiple test cases. Provide "data-info" filters: what do you want to see mainly in the graph (in order to avoid an unreadable graph with thousands of lines) Provide a date filter: you rarely want to views years and years of data Then, display: A graph with the "data-info" for all the test ...


2

In your case I agree with you, A is more logical. And it's ok to take more time; nobody's collecting efficiency data on your users (I assume). If your users were business users who had data collected in spreadsheets, then entering that data all at once would probably be better.


2

I think the answer to your question is the same as the answer to the following question: Which one of the following groups of data points is the most closely related? ************** * Option A * ************** [John's Phone Number] [John's Email] [John's Address] OR ************** * Option B * ************** [John's Phone Number] [Mary's Phone ...


2

In my opinion the "Null" would be confusing for the most of people. I would used the "Empty" text.


2

The best way for an organization to get feedback on its services - without just annoying its customers are Customer feedback bots which transform the survey experience. You can check my yesterdays' reply Customer feedback bots Its a way to collect feelings, thoughts, and impressions and turn them into actionable data – a much better way than online surveys &...


2

Totally! Even though some people practitioners accuse this practice of being "ux theater" a common usage of personas is using them to have non-users perform testing while pretending to be different user personas. Many, many times I have done non-user testing with stakeholders playing as users to build awareness and grow the understanding of UX within ...


2

The short answer is: It is fine for the scenario you described, assuming that the term usability testing was used consciously. Quoting from Wikipeda: [Usability Testing] is more concerned with the design intuitiveness of the product and tested with users who have no prior exposure to it. Usability testing is best used to answer the question Is this ...


1

I'd expect the behaviour to be the opposite of what you're saying... When I press back I'd expect some kind of warning about my data being "reset". When I press home I expect the form to stay as it is. I might need to switch between app to look up some values you're asking, so that won't be possible then?


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