150

Tickers are like carousels, but worse. Since you're asking for disadvantages, tickers are an antipattern because: The content is unpredictable for users. Users don't know how large the content is, what order it appears in, where it starts or ends, and how long it will take to read all of it. It either scrolls too slow or too fast. If a reader is focused ...


58

I think the best and simple solution is to put the lowest score (winner) at the top, and the rest below. Since people tend to think that who is at the top of the list is the better one. Like a leaderboard. Also think and research about computers benchmarking. Some times they have graphics with a sub-title "Less is better". Hope I helped you out.


52

This is just my opinion, but it's an answer. Tickers, or marquees, where you see them, tend to inhabit small spaces. Whether that's across the front of a cinema, the back of a police car or on a train station sign. In the real world they offer an advantage in that they can display more information than the display can statically display, but in a smaller, ...


32

Your approach is not intuitive because you're presenting a score proportional to energy consumption but you score players according to the inverse of that. Calculate a score for participants which matches the intuitive mental model of an elementary school child (bigger/higher is better) and chart that value. In simple words...invert the score you use in your ...


30

One question to ask is: Is the user aware of the benefits of upgrading / activating? How am I improving their life? In the current state, you have a card list, other than the button label, I can't differentiate between the two. I also don't really see the benefits, and 'Activate' could mean a committment before I've learned what it's doing for my company. ...


28

Sort the chart by putting bar with smaller number (which is good) on the top, and bar with bigger number (which is bad) on the bottom. Set color for bar with smaller number as green (or any positive-representation color), and bar with bigger number (or any negative-representation color)


26

You need to show the account balance when it is zero. If a user is using the account balance feature then they're going to get really confused if it disappears entirely. They have no way of knowing that account balance is temporarily hidden just because it dropped to zero. They are going to spend some time hunting for their account balance and get ...


26

From a UXMovement.com article: Top or left menu, there is no absolute answer. When it comes to designing for users, context is king. A navigation that works well in one context may not fit well for another context. To conclude which navigation is best for your application, it's important to understand the different context where the top and left ...


24

I'd even increase the vertical space for your label. It needs a bit more breathing room. If you do this, you can move your filter options (or are they action buttons?) to the top. This will clean up your UI, position labels and buttons in a more logical position and also shorten the overall height of your application. See the images below. Current situation ...


24

Although I like your solution of naming the buttons differently (manage vs activate) but I did not noticed the difference in vocabulary right away. In my experience, I like ghosting the unavailable containers and perhaps a little snipe in the corner. Allow the entire box to be clickable.


21

Scrolling text can be a barrier to accessibility, so much so that WCAG requires that you provide a control that allows the user to pause, stop, or hide the moving content (SC 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide). Content that moves or auto-updates can be a barrier to anyone who has trouble reading stationary text quickly as well as anyone who has trouble tracking ...


15

Bend that bar into a circle! A donut chart is perfect for 'percent of total' visualizations. And using color to indicate account "health" adds another layer for the visual thinker. It makes for a fairly compact presentation that delivers the all the critical data. For smaller spaces, I would limit the displayed data to balance only and tap/click to ...


14

As a corollary to both @tohster and @Matt Obee's very nice answers, there is an additional consideration: Tickers remove control from the person viewing the information Someone who is trying to read content that is presented as a static list can scroll up or down at their own leisure, and are actively engaged in that act. Tickers force whoever is viewing ...


12

I think it's your markers that are causing confusion, I believe something like this would make it easier to read. The colours are from Lucid Chart Android elements, there's no reason not to change them to your design guidelines or for something more pleasing. You could also stick a label under the gray area with "Available to spend: 5800" Example of above:...


10

UX Horror: Making users think Here are some reasons why it's bad: Color is not helping: It's very hard to tell just by looking at the Contacts chart if blue/green portion matches the number, there isn't any clear sign to indicate this. I think that colors don't make a big difference in this kind of chart where they don't have a direct relationship with the ...


9

Show it if it's ever been nonzero. There are two competing considerations: don't hide valuable information from the user, but don't overwhelm new users with information that they are unlikely to understand. Putting these together reveals a third option: show the account balance if and only if it has ever been nonzero. This way, you progressively reveal ...


9

Put your navigation buttons in the bottom right of your panel. Consider the Gutenberg diagram; When the user reaches the lower right portion of the page there is a break in the reading or “page scan” process and the user will need to take an action. This is the perfect spot to insert call-to-action such as buttons, links, forms, video, etc. Source:...


9

Great question, Weblurk. There are an infinite number of solutions if this app allows custom coding. But if you can only slide blocks around, then perhaps a UX solution should be less design change and more text change. If you truly want that headline gone, then simply reword the card titles to include the word "office." Yes, it may be redundant to repeat ...


9

Probably the Fuel metaphor may work best for you. So, your race objective will be Given 100 KW of so called fuel complete the distance with minimum fuel loss. But you dont go negative. You can complete distance but if you used all your fuel – your problem, no points. At the end you count the amount of fuel left and can convert it to points (if ...


8

From the GUI Evolution point of view the navigation layer of commands is expected to be on the top, whether on sides of the screen you would commonly find the operational/contextual layer of commands. In the particular case of dashboards, where the navigation layer tends to merge with the operational one, it is probably more elegant to place the menu on the ...


8

Re-sizing elements in this UI may help. Firstly, those first numbers are huge and the ones that follow are way too small. It makes it difficult to read and you can't do so at a simple glance. There is nothing wrong with keeping them the same size and abbreviating them. Secondly, I would add a suffix for millions and remove it for thousands, it's easier ...


8

EDIT: For completeness and with Andrews comment I don't think there is "one name" for that section of the Dashboard apart from "Overview" I you are asking about the content of that element these are all various "Metrics". The Metrics of what - that depends on the content of your Dashboard. So if you are providing on overview of some data you are already ...


8

Increase the contrast so users can see the values at a glance. The progress bar can visually support the number without taking up additional visual space. By trying to keep the number in the bar, users are potentially getting information less quickly, which goes against what a dashboard seeks to achieve: Insight of status at a glance. You can get more ...


7

In general, "dashboards" that consist of lots of visual charts/graphs/dials/gauges: are something management LOVES are rarely all that useful At most, I'd suggest looking at color as a strong indicator of status. At least that has some typical relevance (uh oh, it's red! Who do I yell at!?) Beyond that, though, stick with communicating data rather than ...


7

What you're calling score is not score as it's usually understood - a bigger score is usually understood to be better. The word sounds positive, just like progress. It's nearly like higher speed means going faster, not slower. If you want to keep the energy per square foot value, then find a different word for it, something sounding negative, like "loss" or ...


7

Try to sequence it like a story. Describe a process in as few words as possible. Here's a very simplified version, but perhaps rather than have the look right away at the data at bottom, you could use some subtext under each step describe the sequence: Instead of 'actual' try 'exact', and explain what that meant in that phase. Then show the difference ...


7

Allow 2 views: Sequential view for displaying orders by sequential steps, and a production floor view to show bottlenecks and throughput. Since you can't have a strict order across all steps, have two ways to view the world: at the order level, and the production floor. They serve two different purposes. In either view, you can indicate on the left how many ...


6

I have been trying going through some discussions regarding when and how to implement navigation within a 'dashboard' like page, so here are some of the considerations we have taken into account, which will hopefully help you come up with the right answer: Length of page: this is where the top nav is good for long pages, as the side nav takes up room down ...


6

The first column should be a primary column by which the user can scan down the list of items in the table. Typically a table will be sorted and that could be by any of the columns but by default would typically be the first column - commonly a date or a name or an id that's meaningful to the user. The question here is what criteria are being used to sort ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible