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My thinking is: if you restrict it, you will face the outcry from existing customers. Let's remember that they created these statuses to make them fit their needs. Besides, there is some data from the past they would need to keep a at least comparable with the future data. And finally, people got used to using them after all. On the other side, giving ...


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A lot of people aren’t really in the habit of making their beds every day, and I can’t be the only person who didn’t want to show a messy bedroom this week. I thought the prank would appeal to a lot of people, but I’ve thought that about many projects in the past that never got much attention, like my music videos and a video effect I made that delays darker ...


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I'm dealing with this at the moment on quite a large scale (large areas of an older complex system being evaluated and updated). Relevantly, I also recently attended an Atlassian Design Talk/Panel where they said (paraphrased)... "Think very carefully about each feature you put into your applications, because once they go in, they are very difficult to ...


1

It's a fundamental question and it touches every aspect of design: flexibility vs. rigidity, freedom vs. order. As designers we want to please the users and give them the tools they need and want. However, being too liberal and compromising can result in "committee design", which in turn results in a very mediocre product in the end. Users come in different ...


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I think your first focus needs to be on limiting the options shown in the UI, not those available in the settings. If you show every attendance status from every customer's customization, no wonder things became a mess. In this case, the customizability isn't the primary cause of the mess, other factors are. Now, if one customer decides that they want 30 ...


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