6

Sometimes, giving the user straight options won't help. For example - I could be a real-estate agent on a tour (making me both a tourist and a real-estate agent), so which one should I chose on your site? The "thing" you need here is a Natural language UI, give the user a short paragraph, let him fill in some blanks that best describes his visit to the ...


5

Some viruses replace AntiVirus software with fake duplicates that look the same way. That takes more effort when the AntiVirus software doesn't simply use the native skin.


4

Why not make the main page do the separation for you? Use nice big box/tiles/whatever to let the user decide why they are there on the site. Here is how codeacademy labs divides it language platforms: Here is how cydia lets you setup your environment based on your area of interest:


4

Let's split the problem: users can ask for design customization, and interface elements customization (like MS Word in the late nineties, see what I mean?). From my point of view, the former is one the most normal and legitimate needs of human beings. People like to have their own look, but this doesn't mean that you should give full customization power to ...


4

The business of AV companies is confidence. They sell you on the idea of auto-magic security, but have no actual way to show you that it works that way. Because, of course, it doesn't. So they rely on the a set of design and interaction cues not entirely dissimilar to what a slot-machine maker would do. The overly-designed shell is just part of that ...


4

Don't be ambiguous Either you offer the option to customize a view, either you don't. The whole "oh, yes, if you search everywhere and touch everything and pray to all gods and deities you'll eventually found a way to customize the app. A way we DELIBERATELY HID FROM YOU" approach makes absolutely no sense. There are no benefits at all, and you can ...


3

I don't understand why the user would be able to set a font specific to either X or Y - Surely you could place font control as a global variable: set the font once for all elements. - That way the user can only make a consistent choice. I find, when dealing with user customisation, it's best to stick to limited choices and mostly at a large scale: system ...


3

I propose to use colon symbol (:) for loops. It contains appropriate semantics: A colon is used to explain or start an enumeration. So, try {clients:} instead. The ending tag could be: {clients.} – save semantics, but maybe not very visible {:clients} – more consistent with starting tag


2

I think you are describing a check box : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I propose you to use your 50x28 room for a Plus button that delivers you the options in a drop down menu. download bmml source I do not know if I am or not respecting the following constraint : I can't change the dropdown box UI but your ...


2

Customization in consumer products has always been targeted at "making it yours". We're all unique so even if we all have an iPhone and we're all on Facebook, we like that unicity to shine through somewhere. Some services used to overdo that (ahem myspace ahem). Facebook and Twitter on the other hand have a nice balance of offering customization, allowing ...


2

I'd say the "handedness" of a user is only of limited information. Many other factors affect the way a user interacts with the touch screen of a hand held device. You could be lying on your side, or perhaps you put your smartphone down on a table. While a gesture (say a sideways swipe) might have a different curvature when performed with either hand, it will ...


2

In addition to Michael's answer, I'd also like to add that there exist guidelines for product customization which are based on user research and put together by the Nielsen Norman group. Quoted from the report: Web technology allows organizations to move beyond one-size-fits-all interfaces and products — allowing users to define and design their own ...


2

I think you don't need to change any existing principles or guidelines. The only thing you need to do is to be more thorough with the mapping of user mental models and customer journeys to work out where the similarities and differences are. This is the starting point for any customization decisions that you need or may not need to make. I would also ...


2

I have encountered similar psychology. It seems users have a natural propensity to jump right into designing and customizing to their "needs," without regard to solving the problem or meeting goals. In my experience with doing microsites for internal groups in large organizations, users tend to think they are part of designing a website. However, this is ...


2

Show common options / Hide complex ones Users should rarely interact with customization options. There are times when one user needs a slightly different configuration than another but if the initial defaults are done right this won't happen a lot. It's okay to make configuration options hidden behind a tiny gear icon or edit link. If you find that most ...


2

It sounds like a bit of contradiction to me, but if you give total control over the appearance to the user then how can you also then restrict them to make consistent choices? I think one common strategy is to give users a 'theme', such as what windows and other operation systems do, that applies a set of styles to the user interface, then allow users to ...


2

You'll normally want to avoid having different things perform the same function because users are likely to expect different results from different elements. In your case, though, it sounds like you're treating the fancy button as a shortcut to a feature. It's not uncommon to see calls to action on a homepage that link to internal pages that you could get ...


2

You should take a look to most CMS that include this kind of feature. What they usually do is to offer pre-defined layout sets with fonts, colors and some choice of structure (columns, full width vs boxed and such). Personally, I also offer a way to modify things further with extra HTML and CSS coding. Since this will only be used by advanced users, they can ...


2

Why do you want to define what the user should do? What if i want to have my logo displayed on a white (or any other color) background? Stop forcing your aesthetic perceptions onto the user and allow them to upload whatever they want as their logo. What you can do is educate the user about the option to upload a logo with a transparent background and guide ...


2

My thinking is: if you restrict it, you will face the outcry from existing customers. Let's remember that they created these statuses to make them fit their needs. Besides, there is some data from the past they would need to keep a at least comparable with the future data. And finally, people got used to using them after all. On the other side, giving ...


2

A few points as to why I have used them in the past: As you say, a good vibe and feel using customisation. Personalisation. It lets the user add a sprinkle of character to their information/profile, it lets them have their own little imprint on it. Which in turn...(point 3). It makes us feel good. Users are able to put the photos of their kids or partners ...


2

Hick's Law is a principle that would apply here: The time it takes to make a decision increases with the number and complexity of choices. Generally, users want a system to make intelligent choices for them, so they can spend their time doing their core job functions. A lot of non-designers might find the icon-selection task to be beyond their abilities, ...


2

It looks like this flow is: User clicks on the phrase to see options User is presented with options that have a difference in tone User clicks on an option to select it, and then clicks OK to apply it The selected option replaces the original phrase I think you don't need the OK button to confirm the option selection. The selection should trigger the ...


1

Once a user creates a custom workflow, allow them to save it as a template for reuse. If the potential for large amount that they may need access to, but use infrequently, allow the to pin or favorite a common workflow. Tests that are outside a workflow It sounds like tests are also a separate object. You could have a landing page that separates them into 2 ...


1

You don't need to do anything If I get an article customized (physical, virtual, software, etc), I don't expect to know which features were customized for me. By adding these customization, I know the whole item has changed and it's unique for me. Adding a notice about differences will make me expect different behaviors or wonder about differences with ...


1

There's a chapter in About Face regarding customisability, which explains that in sovereign applications (which tend to have many features and are used for long periods of time by a user) customisability is important in making the space more likeable and familiar. However, mobile apps are almost always transient in posture, and the movement of objects will ...


1

Just provide a "Recently used" section for each type of design choice. For example when changing the font have a recently used font like provided in MS word: For colors, use recently used color: etc. If you want you can add under it a label saying where it is used but unless the user is using way too many fonts or colors they should be able to determine ...


1

While providing font customizations may seem like an eye candy feature, you might want to pose a limitation on the number of choices. It becomes difficult for people other than designers to make font choices if they are given more choices to decide from. Choose in such a way that the fonts are from different families to help making the decision easier. Ideal ...


1

If I understand your question correctly, you're trying to learn the user's inbound search terms and tailor your content accordingly, correct? You used to be able to do this by looking at inbound search terms from Google, but as of 2013, Google encrypted almost all searches so that it's no longer possible. It's a boon for privacy, but a defeat of a large ...


1

Allowing users to customise their site is a great thing. However, they are probably not designers and you should keep control over that. You could offer them to choose between several layout and then set it up by choosing a pair of fonts and a swatch. They would feel in control, customise their site as they want to with a nice result. Marjan's comment is ...


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