123

Humanization is no different from any other design technique Like many other design approaches, humanizing an interface has advantages and disadvantages and as such, is correspondingly prone to overuse and misuse. I'm not a fan of humanizing as a goal. Websites are not humans, and trying to humanize a website is useful only if it actually improves user ...


79

I would say it's too humanized if it hinders the users in finding the information they visited the site for in the first place. I once visited the website of the local supermarket to find out their opening hours on a holiday. I entered every menu option i could see, but couldn't find the opening times. Instead, I found a lot of pictures of smiling employees,...


24

An experience is overly personal when it shares irrelevant details that get in the way of the message. Humanizing is just explaining things in terms of people rather than systems, not telling someone’s life story for no reason.


24

Think about what it means to be staring at that loading spinner: The user doesn’t want to do any of this. He has no interest in managing his utilities. It’s something he might have to do from time to time, but he’s hardly happy about it. This had better be a smooth experience. The system has failed. Few people go straight to support without a problem ...


9

When it begins to feel disingenuous, which is nearly always. In fact, most attempts at 'humanization' result in absurdities that people are so numb to by now they just ignore it. It's just noise at this point. Why generate more noise? Do something more productive. "Hello! Welcome to our site! What would you like to do today?" This is, for some reason, ...


9

If you ask this question, I suppose you're among the happy persons who have never read comments on YouTube or any social media. If: Users are encouraged to contribute (no matter how, would it be by gaining reputation/points, or receiving an e-mail “Hey, there is someone who needs your help on an article you purchased recently,” or anything else), They do ...


7

People are making a lot of sense from the software side, but I think we need to look deeper. You essentially don't want people to be an expense without providing revenue. In that case, what's to stop a user from going to the restaurant, checking in, and leaving without spending any money? The only way to ensure revenues exceed expenses is to tie them ...


5

As you stated in the latter part of the question, catching HTTP errors in a clean, meaningful page is good UX. A stack-trace dump of error messages is scary to most users, and is a potential security risk (as noted by Steve Jones). There are plenty of examples out there, I personally like Google's. As for multiple error messages, I don't think the page ...


4

Humanizing is OK as a design tool if used sparingly, though I think people are smart / cynical enough not to be fooled by it. What ever you do DO NOT ANIMATE. Sounds are even worse. This is extremely distracting to the user. The user has come to your website to perform a task and you are effectively trying to hijack their attention. All those who remember ...


4

Short answer is they compliment each other, but ACSI is not about usability, although the usability of something could influence the ACSI score, but I doubt anyone has found a correlation. There is clearly a small overlap between the ACSI approach and usability research approach, e.g. at a high level gathering qualitative and quantitative measures, but the ...


4

Experience Design is an emerging discipline that draws from many other disciplines including cognitive and perceptual psychology, architecture and environmental design, product design, interaction design, information design, service design, hazard analysis, linguistics, haptics, ethnography, and more. Perhaps more than other forms of design, [experience ...


4

What if a Temporary QR code is Randomly Generated in the Rewards App, and then scanned in the premises? So, here is the story - 1) When I want to check-in, I fire the rewards app, and it generates a random QR code. 2) At the counter, or say a mounted tablet device or something, the scanning app is available. I scan the random QR code and check-in. 3) The ...


4

A customer journey map is a subset of a customer experience map which includes many other information like opportunities, pain points, calls to action, qualitative insight, why does each touchpoint exist from an operations perspective, what department is responsible for each touchpoint, does each touchpoint enhance or weaken a customer’s experience etc. ...


4

The best way for an organization to get feedback on it's services - without just annoying its customers are Customer feedback bots which transforms the survey experience. What was once an act of filling out a boring form is now a conversation. A conversation you load with your brand personality. And users appreciate this shift! Leaving feedback through ...


3

When you got a bad review first apologies for you could't exceed their expectations. Then genuinely respond to resolve their issue. This can turn into your advantage because people will see how much you concern and willing to help. When it comes to people who deliberately seek to damage the reputation of their competitors; ask questions like, when you ...


3

I agree with comment by @jazZRo to your previous question that it is better to include price to first button. Thus you can avoid user frustration by clearly showing the options. However, the decision is yours. Possible wordings for the buttons: Save pure image ($00.00) Save pure ($00.00) Save clean image ($00.00) Save clean ($00.00) Save tagged image (free)...


3

This sounds like it only applies to websites that want to sell you something. I definitely wouldn't see this coming from websites that want you to use their free product. For example, I definitely wouldn't see it coming from a site that boasts a new Javascript framework, or a site that promotes community service, etc. It also relies heavily on whether or ...


3

You should consider a few strategies for helping users to focus their energy (attention and possibly frustration): Expectations Management Use a predictive system for the length of time until an agent might help them. This can be something you build, or a SaaS service you 'rent', or an extension of your existing software. You can outsource the work for ...


2

I don't have actual research, but from anecdotal cases, I think the answer is YES. It turns your service into a commodity, customers switch constantly to get the cheapest deal. Example - Telecomm (Cable & Internet Providers) Here in Canada, we do not have a large selection of cable/internet providers. The "Big 3": Bell, Telus, Shaw owning majority of ...


2

I submit that you can't go too far with humanization. Just look at the Ling's Cars website and how it goes crazy overboard with it...but it not only works, it has worked well. Take a look at their employees page. http://www.lingscars.com/meet-staff.php#models It's hard to be so masterfully tacky, tasteless, and make millions. But, the world's worst website....


2

You may want to consider an alternative solution entirely. Allow your users to edit > save seamlessly. Keep the UX enjoyable and decision free i.e. don't risk confusing or annoying the user when it comes to saving a photo every time they do so. What if a user doesn't understand what a watermark is for example? Instead, just allow them to save away ...


2

Obviously, you should always send it all the customers. Those who didn't complain doesn't mean they never noticed it, they are just avoiding the hassle of complaining or just ignoring it. It's always a nice gesture to send the correct version with a little note of apology in the previous one, or maybe offer them some kind of compensation or perk, if it's ...


2

From Wikipedia's Touchpoint Definition A touchpoint can be defined as any way a consumer can interact with a business, whether it be person-to-person, through a website, an app or any form of communication (“Touchpoint Glossary”, n.d.). When consumers come in contact with these touchpoints it gives them the opportunity to compare their prior ...


2

Here's a GoodUI design idea and A/B test report that indicates an 84% increase in clicks due to repeated calls to action: idea 5: Repeating Your Primary Action The idea here is that a soft call at the top and prominent call at the bottom, after the user has reviewed the content, are helpful, but to balance the number of repeated calls with the length of ...


2

You could try PRETOTYPING pretotyping is a way to test a product idea quickly and inexpensively by creating extremely simplified versions of that product to help validate the premise that “If we build it, they will use it.” Personally, I find it more a great idea than a valid scientific method (well, it doesn't pretend to be scientific), but we've ...


2

1. Decide what success means Decide on your metrics of success early. This is the product's soul, the guiding principals for everything you do. Kerry Rodden's HEART framework is a great structure for that. 2. Test incrementally When you're developing something new (most of my time), you have to test pieces. It's not an "overall" view, but it will guide ...


2

This problem appears to be more business oriented, so you need to gather information on the reasons behind the initial decisions for not combining these sites. For each site, try to ask the motivations behind their existence. Maybe there is a good reason behind one or maybe it is no longer applicable. Having the rationale will help you address the problem ...


2

As you mentioned, the ideal solution would be to provide a seamless experience for users. However, I can imagine how it must be next to impossible to convince all the stakeholders in this case. If you have enough resources, you could develop a prototype of the perfect solution and do some A/B testing. Compare time spent on site, success rate for each ...


2

A 5th website. It will provide an overview to this business, links to each department and subscription services. Nice solution for your client. Current websites will remain as they are. Good for visitors. They will be easily informed for the full system capabilities. And finally good for you. You won't mess so much with current websites, stakeholders and old ...


2

Keep in mind that a consistent or fluent user experience is not just about the look & feel, but that other elements are involved as well. In fact, even though the UI and the interactions might be the first thing that the user experiences, when the nature of the goal or task that they are trying to perform is not solely focused or dependent on visual cues ...


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