62

That is exactly how it is done. What usually happens is that the description of the company itself, the open position and the candidate requirements alone are more than enough to fill a screen. Sometimes there's legal lingo – equal opportunity etc – or a map showing the location of the office. If you place non-sticky buttons top and bottom, people won't ...


43

Be a voter > Vote now Christopher Bryan and Gregory Walton (2011) conducted a study for understanding if using a noun or verb statement have an influence on user motivation. According to the results of their study, participants in noun group expressed significantly more interest, 62.5%, in registering vote than participants in the verb group, 38.9%. ...


21

Stripe.com (a payments processor) offers an even more "immediate" sign-up process - they allow you to skip it all together. Any guest can begin using their dashboard and begin customising settings, testing mock transactions and making customer profiles before entering any sign-up information. No username, password or email. It's only when you want to go live ...


14

A lot depends on the visual design of the screen. If there is enough visual distance between their placement it might be useful to the user. They won't have to scroll to use the button, nor remember its existance. But if they are visible at the same time, it can become confusing.


8

This question is really easy: conversion improvement is based on UX, because it's based on testing, research, analysis, auditing and deployment based on all of these techniques (between others) in which Marketing is just one of those techniques. And I have a Marketing degree, so believe me I'm not putting down marketing, just considering everything on ...


6

The ecommerce company I work for uses modals (pop-ups) to show a quick view of products. Google Analytics doesn't detect this interaction (no trigger was set on it either) so I don't have any data of people who click on the quickview vs. people who navigate to the products detail page. After implementation the effect of it (on conversion rates or something ...


6

This is pretty common (from experience) - and there are a few common reasons: couldn't identify the download link didn't realise they needed to click the link but expected some magic to provide the file browser/user failed to click the link user got distracted "Oooh - look, a youtube video of cats" user found an alternative in another tab and downloaded it ...


6

Guess a lot I know that sounds kind of silly, but that's what it comes down to. You can analyze Sales figures Seasonal volume spikes Site analytics Customer service feedback Related case studies and so on But none of that will tell you the why behind the behavior you're seeing. So you're left with one option: make smart, experience-informed guesses. ...


5

here is my feedback to the all three options: The message in the red box states that something is wrong, however, it isn't. The button "+Add products" doesn't represent the actual action, because no products will be added when the user hits it. The dummy items below add visual complexity to the page, which is confusing. The message about the empty cart is ...


4

I've drawn the diagram which could give you some insights. So your task is to design flow, that leads user to a decision point. Some acquired value and good experience before asking to Sign Up could create relation to a product or service and loss aversion effect. Still, if it isn't gained yet, user has a second chance. The moment of decision making can be ...


4

Here's a great article from Baymard on Quick Views Baymard writes in their article that quick views often lead to small increases in conversion. However... Though quick views may slightly increase conversions at times, there is an overall poor design on the product listing page leading users to rely on quick views. We are simply optimizing something that ...


4

If the CEO is someone I can relate to, think is funny or important figure who make substantial contributions to help organizations, then yes. If the CEO is a family member or a friend, then yes, but she would probably not be friend or family member to the majority of others. If the CEO is funny, like Conan O'Brian or Will Ferrel. If the CEO acts like Bill ...


4

The $300 Million Button So you want a case of "so-and-so changed the button and sales went through the roof"? Well I think this is as close as you'll get, it comes with a snazzy title and all. The $300 Million Button Backstory It's hard to imagine a form that could be simpler: two fields, two buttons, and one link. Yet, it turns out this form was ...


4

Your goal is a good one. In the e-comm space, it's generally accepted that more page loads will result in less customers at the end of the funnel. The funnel is a cruel master. But there's a catch Your question hints at the fact that a shorter solution must also be a good one. You can't just cram a page full of info and declare "look, there's less pages ...


3

Generally, pick speed over image quality. But if you're willing to invest, you may be able to get both. The tradeoff here is image quality vs load time, and I don't think studies are going to help you particularly because the results really depend on how your site uses images. For example, if you are displaying products in a grid, users tend to be much ...


3

In my opinion, I will break this down into 3 part. First form will require the person's personal info such as the name and contacts. After the user complete the form, then prompt the other 2. This will effectively reduce the cluttering on the screen. The choice of using a list over a drop down as it's easier to view all. You might want to add in Location ...


3

In a B2B environment (in which captive audiences are more common) one of the biggest hurdles is that the buyers are not the users. Purchasing is often done through committee, assessing the needs of the business and then considers the solutions from qualified vendors. Although user considerations are often part of the decision process, prioritization is more ...


3

I recommend looking at this article which talks about a A\B test that was done on seeing the conversion rates while using a solid call to action vs a ghost button in emails. To quote the article Test A used our baseline newsletter template, which includes ghost buttons. Test B replaced these ghost CTAs with solid blue buttons. Everything else about ...


3

I think buttons are better as well because it gives the user a full understanding of what sizes are available and how the garment is sized just at a glance. For example, a dress can be sized with letters (XS, S, M...) or numbers (00, 0, 2, 4), and all sizes might not be offered (XS, 00). Even if your sizing is generally consistent, it's still helpful to ...


3

tl;dr Horizontal nav is good for overviews. Vertical nav is good when you need persistent deep-dive controls. Landing pages are an immersive experience worthy of experimentation. E-comm has been around a while now. We have some solid, generalized patterns for shopping experiences. Top / horizontal nav is a good pattern for exposing high-level ...


3

There are many possible reasons, but without seeing your site or that specific page, it’s just a bunch of wild guesses: You have restrictions on where you ship (e.g. only to the US when you have a global audience). Check your traffic per location, and check conversion rates (and exits on that page) per location. You have unreasonable restrictions, like ...


2

I agree with BrianN's answer: skip the registration-first step. Here is an extended explanation of why this works best, which I feel complements his answer. You defined one of your goals as "get them signed up". But as a normal, white-hat business, this is not really your goal. Your goal is to get them to become regular users, whatever the definition of "...


2

OAuth With OAuth (facebook, twitter, Gmail intergration) you can grab the user's email address from whatever service you used to sign them up from and allow them to change it of they want and then they press save. That way, if the OAuth service provider decides to charge or discontinues the service you still have an email address that the user account is ...


2

I looked around the site and saw that you have a huge selection. Unfortunately, you only have one information hierarchy to help customers find a particular costume. A "Search" box will go a long way to helping people stay on the site searching for costumes. In addition, another set of links at the bottom of the page might be helpful with options like "Maybe ...


2

That real estate on the website is not as valuable as you think it is. Users expect navigation at the top so they can explore the site. Users eyes tend to go down the left side and across the middle, which is why most sites use a promo image slider just below the top navigation. This is an interesting article about the f-layout and zigzag ( http://www....


2

In addition to some great links provided by Devin, I would also like to point out this 45 minute video by Leah Buley about modern UX organization. She has discussed many important points like: Conversion rates and UX Role of UX in driving valuations of companies like Slack and AirBnB Different kinds of UX design processes and how they affect revenues, ...


2

It's hard to say if an icon will increase conversions! It highly depends on the audience, the site, and how/when someone sees the button. Even a case study from another company won't be very helpful because it will only tell you what worked for them. Try a Simple A/B Test A: Product page with "add to cart" button (no icon) B: Product page with "add to ...


2

One of the most widely used statements in the industry us "PCI Compliant". Most educated merchants look for this statement before even calling about a product or service. Some other suggestions Ive pulled from some big name players in the industry; "We've been a trusted partner for payments since 1996." (authorize.net) End-to-end encrypting card reader, ...


2

Best practice for "download" buttons is don't make them flashy or look like spam. We're all used to fake download buttons. Make it clean. I'd recommend you use flat design for it so that it stands out from all of the 90's era buttons that are still all over the web to get you to download trojans.


2

yes, the footer. or at least a lot of the seo content on it can be removed after cart and thru ought the checkout. The header should be minimised or removed as well to avoid the user from getting distracted and navigating away from the checkout process.


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