30

A combo box has a specific interaction which has not changed for decades. Its interaction is aligned with a simple user goal - to select one or more items. Most users will expect this interaction. Note: A combo box does not have a pop-up - it is an expandable/collapsible list. A tooltip has a completely different user goal - it is to provide additional ...


25

I think it is a great idea to use right click to context menu. It is a norm in desktop application and I see no reason for it not to be the case in web interfaces. And many if not all tools from Google and Microsoft now use right click actions to offer content related actions. And right click can be nicely replaced with long tap on touch-enabled devices, ...


17

A tooltip without a close button lacks affordance on how to close it. Therefore, users would want to close the tooltip but may not know exactly how. It's not evident that clicking anywhere else on the page will close it. This can cause confusion and even some novice users might leave the current website/app because they might change or mess something. ...


16

The biggest advantage of radial or pie menus is their speed. To quote this article. Radial Menus Are Fast Radial menus are faster to access than list-based menus in every kind of pointer-based UI, including cursor, stylus, and touch. One big part of that is because every option is spaced at the same distance from the pointer. That’s classic ...


13

It would be good UX for a general UI, but it is bad UX on the web. Your custom right click menu will block the regular one, what is against the principle of least surprise and possibly against what the user wants to do. Maybe he likes to use the browser's context menu, e.g. for copy, select all or even some more advanced options of current browsers, like ...


12

There's a third option similar to the one used on this page: the message tray icon that is only activated when it has some content with the corresponding number. Advantage: The message tray can contain any type of message or alert: not just a type but any It doesn't disappear when there is no any alert, it simply occupies the same place, it's a way of ...


10

To add to the answers already given, let me say that if the two ComboBox mockups you show are intended to be equivalent, at least one of them is confusing/misleading. Having a "Save" button implies that changes will not be saved unless you click it. If the changes are saved automatically even if you click away or close the window, without clicking "Save," ...


7

On standard Windows, icons and checkboxes share in the same column. Thant means you cannot have both a checkmark and an icon at the same time. The following image is from a Delphi 32bit EXE, wrapping the standard Windows API - images seem to take precedence to checkmarks: I have seen (rarely) programs with two such columns, showing checkmarks to the left of ...


6

Google's guidelines explicitly mention something about the order of the items in a menu: Menus with static content should have the most frequently used menu items placed at the top of the menu. Menus with dynamic content may have other behavior, such as placing previously used fonts at the top of the menu. The order can change based on user ...


6

I'm not familiar with the Amiga Workbench UI that you describe, and from what I understand the idea is that there's no menu that's visible at all times, and you need to right-click anywhere and hold, which makes the menu appear, and then while holding the mouse button down you need to operate the menu. This is a screenshot that I found. I can see a few ...


6

In general, when designing menus, you should optimize for speed. A well-designed menu reduces the time a user needs to find a particular menu item. A couple of helpful strategies, in descending order of preference: Put frequently used options at the front. E.g., 'Open' in your case seems a logical option to put on top. Group related items. Both 'new' menu ...


6

One problem with your first example is in deciding which message to summarize. In your example, there appear to be two messages (one informative: there's an update available; one error/warning: connection issue). By showing an summary of the informative message, you are actively hiding the presence of the warning message (the user might not want to update ...


5

A couple of things: Additional actions should go on the right since users will scan the information before making a decision on the action. (so not option 2 or 3) I like the concept of the hamburger menu since you have quite a few options available, but I would change the icon though to either say 'Actions' and include all of the options or maybe a '...' to ...


5

I've actually tried to right click on some cells to see if I could add more rows or columns (and sometimes it doesn't happen at all and I have to look for another tool). So, from my experience/opinion as a user, it's a good idea I would like to see more often. From a UX designer perspective I would tell you to test it in some way, asking the user which ...


5

This post I will answer like a web user. I have a confession: I'm always trying to use right-click on the web tools (web applications that work like a tool, like Google Drive) and nobody care with this. Rarely I saw someone using it. Otherwise, I will feel strange, maybe unhappy, if you do it on a website or e-commerce. Congratulations for your idea. ...


4

Here are a couple of good blog posts to look at that have a great explanation of why radial menus can be a good way of displaying options to your user. Usability of Radial Menus Touch Means Renaissance for Touch Devices Basically they explain that radial menus can be a great way to display a right click type of contextual menu in touch devices. Once a user ...


4

In Windows menus can have either commands (Print) or options (View => Large Icons). This is what Windows Design Guidelines for menus says about using bullets and checkmarks: Menu items that are options may use bullets and checkmarks. Commands may not. And on using icons: Consider providing menu item icons for: The most commonly used menu ...


4

Color was already suggested, but is simple iconography an option? A tiny "lock" icon, or even a box or shaded area with a faint lock image as a background perhaps? Super quick example


4

Because the system will take some time to figure out if there are actions available, you can't just remove the contextual menu. This will just confuse users and it will look like the systems is not functioning correctly. I suggest you go with a menu with a message that says "no actions available for this object". "No actions available" on its own could ...


3

From the Windows Guidelines: Context menu: Do the following conditions apply: Is there a small set of contextual commands and options that apply to the selected object or window region? Are these menu items redundant? Are the target users familiar with context menus? If so, consider providing context menus for the objects and ...


3

My impression is that Android intends to provide the same interface for both mobiles that have a menu button and for those that don't. Since you wouldn't know if your user has a menu button, you shouldn't depend on it. However, maybe they do have a menu button. And if they tap it, the expected behaviour should occur. That is, my reading of the article is ...


3

No, disabling the context menu does not constitute bad practice. This is a common behavior. Real world references: Try right-clicking in Gmail or Google Docs. Obviously, these are highly successful services that have been thoroughly user tested. In general, I would venture to say that if what you are building resembles an application (a utility that ...


3

I would suggest not using the chevron at all. A natural way for mobile users of scanning through large amounts of menu items is to allow them to scroll through or swipe items. The perfect example is Google, if you visit the mobile version, the menu options beneath the search bar are swipeable/scrollable left and right. See how there is a fade on the right ...


3

When it comes to popping up a contextual menu, the overflow icon is now widely used for that purpose. If the majority of websites your users visit already use this convention, It makes sense to leverage on this learned mental model already. So to answer your question: use an overflow icon (horizontal or vertical is fine). You may even add a border to it on ...


2

@hidrees is on the correct and what I do varies slightly. I combine the two suggestions. I use a Group Action combobox in the header whose selected action will be applied to all selected rows. I use a single Action combobox per row to apply the selected action to that row. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups As you can ...


2

You could group together actions near the top so that the user has to click the checkbox next to a row and then hit Edit/Delete/Show/Stats. This should work for mobile as well: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Alternatively, you could do something like this: download bmml source And for mobile users, default to how ...


2

I would say use both. When it is easy to use both do it. The worst thing would be to get in a situation where a person goes to hit the physical button that they are used to and nothing happens, that to them would appear that something doesn't work right. They have this physical button that from their knowledge should do something but it doesn't. This is ...


2

Using words like "star" or "favorite" usually imply some sort of bookmarking or tagging, which in this use case would not communicate to the user the true meaning of the interaction. The three examples below are similar in that they explicitly label the action using words that are unambiguous. Any variation on the wording below would be acceptable so long ...


2

If you don't want anything to clutter your rows all the time with icons (like a drop down menu arrow, a hamburger menu, 3 vertical dots or similar) I think your option here is to show one of those icons when the row is clicked. You will at some point need to tell the user that the row has options, and that is really the standard way of doing that. You can ...


2

Staying consistent with menus is a rule of thumb for keeping users happy. In your example, you can simply add a horizontal menu for the 'Recipe' page, giving the user the contextual menu for that particular page. The sidebar should always display the same menus as replacing them loses the entire context and flow of the links and their hierarchy.


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