19

In this question you can see several answers about when to use text vs icons. I would go for all text as icons are not always understandable by everyone in the same way and some of them depend on the user's context. What I would advice in your case is what Google Material says not to do in this note: Don't. Do not combine text labels with icons. Use either ...


14

If it's a single column, it's debatable and depends on how clearly you label the header, and what sort of data is in neighbouring columns for example, but I would generally advise including the % symbol for clarity. However, if it affects the whole table, and the table is more than a few rows or columns then the visual clutter would be overwhelming, for ...


12

I would take into consideration 3 factors: 1. The Icons How Obvious are the icons? Are they commonly known and used for a single purpose? or you are developing your own icons? 2. The Users Would you say the users are "power users"? Or they come from an average technical background? Maybe their skills are even weak? 3.The Usage / The Context How often ...


11

Columns of figures should be tabular and right aligned if they share the same unit, and the headings should match. Guidelines, via Morten Hjerde (IXDA thread): All text left aligned All numbers right aligned Single characters are centered Numbers that are not values, like product codes for example, are treated like text and left aligned. ...


8

Table headers The header in tables is a complementary element that provides a contextual help to what's in the actual columns - but it's the data itself that interest users. Ideally, only new users will use the header at the first few usage instances (unless the columns are very similar in nature, in which case the header will be used much more often - I ...


8

If you want to stick with a table, you could try to rotate the column titles (either by 45° or 90°) If the five columns are exclusive (An Administrator is never also something else), you could replace those columns with a single one. If they are non-exclusive, you might try if something like a tag-system works (look at how tags are handled here on SE)


7

If a term is wrong, even from a big company such as Microsoft, you should use the one recognized by your users. Your users are the ones who are going to use this feature, and they just want an unambiguous name as possible, instead of a trademark name. But be careful, your users are not the same as your co-workers. You need to test this on actual users – and ...


6

Users will prefer to use a term that means something to them. Imagine a conversation between a user and support center staff. "How do I only show rows of information with a certain item from column A?" "You can use the AutoFilter for that." "OK, great. Where is that?" "They are at the top of each column." "Oh - there's more than one ...


5

You can abbreviate the column headers, such as: Adm, Rep, Ed, Adv, ad Own. And add a tool-tip to each header which contains the full name.


4

Numerical data is right-aligned. Textual data is left-aligned because is read from left-to-right. Headers are aligned with their data and center alignment is not recommended. I know that this question is from 5 years ago, but I saw it has no answer and I found this article, "Design Better Data Tables" very detailed and complete as an answer. Numerical ...


4

I wonder whether it might be possible to transpose the rows and columns, so that instead of something like this: you have something like this instead: but I suppose it rather depends on how many users you think you might have....


4

The column headers aren't part of the data, therefore it's good if these are visually distinguishable from the cell data. This can be achieved by font style, tile background and alignment. So, using center alignment for your column header but not for your cell content is no violation against best practices, on the contrary.


4

In this case you're saving exactly one character ("IPv4" vs "-/-") which isn't worth the extra effort that your users need to expend in order to figure out what you meant. Also this symbol of repetition/substitution is highly localized and I wouldn't expect too many users to be familiar with it. A better way to handle it would be to take the repeating ...


4

I detest the iTunes UX, so I'm a fan of any competition :-) The 'conventional' way to sort is by clicking on the column headers. So I think any solution should attempt to be compatible with this behavior. For multi-column sort, things become more difficult. Columns can quickly get cluttered with tiny arrows or badges. The tiny directional arrows can be ...


3

I guess that comment is an answer Don't make the user guess with vague, systems-centric labels like "state". If the switch represents turning policy enforcement on or off: Enforce policy


3

One advantage of using letters for columns is that it makes it easy to refer cells, rows and columns. If you refer in Excel to A12, it's very clear that you mean "Column A, Row 12". If both rows and columns used numbers, you couldn't write it that shortly - 112 can be "Column 1, Row 12" or it could be "Column 11, Row 2". So you have to separate them - 1-12. ...


3

I think it's pretty much an accepted standard to use [i] (or similar) icons beside each item you want to display help - changing the industry standard instantly gives your customers another thing to think about. A good book to read on this kind of thing is Steve Krug's "Don't Make Me Think" Example - everyone expects a front door handle to be at hand ...


3

This is allowed and there are ways to structure your markup to aid accessibility. In general, you provide unique IDs for each <th> and then each <td> lists which headers apply to itself. This prevents the extra headers from being read by the assistive tool. <th id="th1" headers="blank">Header 1</th> <td headers="th1">Data 1&...


2

You could do the sorted column highlight not in the the header but in the column itself. You could also use a flat color for sorted, and another shade of that color for hover.


2

I recently had a similar problem where there were two different names in common use for the same object. There really isn't right and wrong answer, but what we did was: Ask a number of our users what word they would use to describe that object. You have to be careful not to use any of the candidate words though, so that you get their most natural response....


2

Don't try to include different information in the same column in a table. It will confuse people and will generally not be very useful. Possible options are: Include new columns for the new types of data. If that column can be filled for the existing data, they should. So using your example, you should include "Total hours" in a new column, and maybe "...


2

This is an old question but I recall a professors' advice years ago that I use: if it would/could be summed up or added or is currency or quantity, right align if it's text or sentences or words, generally left align if the cells are compared between rows or typically scanned for differences, center align it (like part numbers, warehouse numbers, codes, ...


2

Processing Date, or perhaps Process Date? "Last Active" might also work. I'm assuming you have another column indicating completeness?


2

I'd recommend going with the first, and placing the stress on the nouns. This is more natural for English speakers, from your name I suspect you might be French-speaking and inclined to reverse the order of adjectives and nouns? For guidance, check out Google Images with some samples, you will see clearly the stress on nouns: https://www.google.com/search?...


2

I would go for Last changed or Date added. The user knows he is seeing a date and a time. You don't have to tell him. The user wants to know what this date means that he is seeing. That's not clear when you just write Date.


1

If you give this table a title called "IP4 Addresses" and now your column headings can just be: Wanted Used Wasted This is a different way to remove the repetition.


1

The Title ( and maybe subtitle ) should convey this information. I took the liberty of freeing your data from it's cells, pivoting the table,adding some breathing room and other niceties, this is not part of your question, but I think the whole table should strive for muted unbiased clarity.


1

If the element is clickable, make it noticeable and get rid of any uncertainty about the affordance of the given element. In order to achieve this, you can try different options: use a floating button action as trigger: this is the Google Material approach, so it's meant for Android, and it visually helps the user to clearly understand what is a header and ...


1

As a background, this way of column/row labelling (or cell referencing) is called the A1 referencing style. It uses one or two letters on refer to a column (up to 256 columns) and a number (from 1 to 65536) to refer to a row. Another cell referencing style in spreadsheets is the R1C1 style. This style uses numbers to refer to both columns and rows. It ...


1

I definitely wouldn't think to mouse-over table headers to get tooltips. Since you don't want to show a tooltip cue after each header, could you instead add a single help button on the screen that explains the different columns?


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