15

I would rather go with actual workers than models. If you are asking this question on UX Q&A site, I would give you the UCD approach rather than the cogsci approach to marketing. By using actual workers in actual working conditions, you run the advantage of being transparent and conveying much more information through the image than what you could have ...


13

I would start with different (and larger) icons for the notes in the table/grid e.g. an icon of a note with a padlock for internal notes and icon of a chat symbol for external notes Then I'd consider moving the icons closer together, to make the differences between them more noticeable (to prevent user from only noticing one). Make sure they are not too ...


12

It's quite an age old question in UX/Universal Design. But, with time I feel the importance diminishing. Some reasons maybe true globalization of products/brands/english language/etc. I know companies still have to rebrand their products based on the country the are launching in, but those cases are getting fewer. Once again, just a personal observation. ...


7

I would say you should explicitly label them as such: Maybe even do a bootstrap-like popover notification when they hover the green, Client Notes, icon which explicitly states that These notes are visible to the client! Update After reading your comment I would like to update the answer to mention that adding alerts, confirmations, Captchas, etc...are ...


6

The almost six year old study performed by Ying Dong and Kun-Pyo Lee at the Industrial Design Department, KAIST, Daejeon, Korea named A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study of Users' Perceptions of a Webpage: With a Focus on the Cognitive Styles of Chinese, Koreans and Americans compares different cognitive styles based on Nisbetts' research. The study object is ...


6

In western culture, red has a negative connotation (however for Japan this is the opposite). It is used as a warning or error, so using it as the primary option is a violation of the consistency principle (at least for most users). While cultural meaning might not be as important as it used to be, having consistent user interfaces is. Since most ...


5

Here is a list of biases you should avoid. These biases may result in bias in emotional responses from the subject of the pictures or from the subject of the test. Facial Expressions: The faces should have the same facial expressions (neutral, smiling, etc.), or they should be distributed evenly. Gender: the ratio should be the same in both groups. ...


5

It makes no sense to consider a single color. You have to consider the color in its context. No one was ever stopped from drinking Coca-Cola because of the red in the logo. So long as the context and the surroundings are unknown, it is impossible to give an informed opinion on a choice of color.


4

It's a complex question, as there are a lot of conditions both flashing (hue, frequency, luminosity, etc.) and human (psychophysiological state, color blindnes, etc.). I've read this topic in Engineering Psychology books (this is the name of the field in ex-USSR), there were a lot of experiments. Unfortunately, the books are on Russian. Still short and ...


4

First of all, never count on users to read anything. Not. At. All. They won't, and by the time you are explaining to them that the label was Right! There! On! Their! Screen!, the damage has already been done. Consider making the micro-interaction for composing a customer-visible note strikingly different — and slightly more difficult — than writing an ...


4

I would probably try using an analogy like alphabetic fridge magnets vs. a photograph of said fridge magnets to define a real world situation which mimics the difference. They could look at a fridge with a word spelled on it and a photo of that fridge and the concept of being able to interact with the text on one and not the other may become clearer. If you ...


4

A user really needs some kind of incentive to continue with a rather tedious task. Incentives can be anything and brought in various forms: A score meter for password strength; or even an animation to reward you The value they gain from doing so (e.g. an e-book, an extended evaluation version, sneak previews, ...) A tangible incentive (probably nobody that ...


4

I imagine that the reason behind having two separate themes for these browsing modes is to better reinforce communication to the user about which mode they are browsing in. The difference in visual style is a subtle yet distinct visual cue to the user about which mode they are in. It wouldn't be a nice experience if you wanted to browse 'incognito mode' ...


3

NN/G Has a really good article about credibility in web design that I feel is applicable to your situation. However I will add some points from my own experience as well. 1) Content: Are you explaining to the users succinctly what should they expect from the app? Does your messaging follow good grammar rules and has zero spelling mistakes? (Think how ...


3

Request Tracker (a trouble ticket system) handles this quite well. It has both comments (which are internal messages) and correspondence (which is sent to end users). When composing a message, the background of the textarea is white for comments, and light red (#fcc) for correspondence. The red background color makes you stop for a moment and consider who ...


3

As a designer, red is considered to provoke the most response amongst users. However depending on how the color is used it can have positive or negative effects. Within my workplace the use of a navy blue color as a primary action button and a light grey color as a secondary button are practiced. These colors provide a balance to forms located throughout ...


2

There is no right color for your primary and secondary buttons. What does matter is how much contrast there is between the two. I believe that the color does have a huge significance in what you are trying to display to the user, however I do not believe that the exact hue or shade has an enormous significance as long as your UI is consistent throughout ...


2

The visual system has evolved to respond to movement in peripheral vision. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peripheral_vision Flicker fusion threshold is higher for peripheral than foveal vision. Peripheral vision is good at detecting motion (a feature of rod cells). This is I believe some evolutionary hard wired thing that bypasses some of the 'thinking' (ie ...


2

I think the most simple and effective solution would be to change the labels and the interface of both modals. So there is a contextual and visual difference between the two functions. Because now the two different functions are almost the same in terms of Look & Feel, so people are likely to think it will work the same and will confuse the output of the ...


2

In my opinion this can have a couple of different reasons – here's just some thoughts: Moderation of comments can be a lot of work – especially if you have a popular blog and you're writing all by yourself. For a high quality, high traffic blog I would estimate that moderating incoming comments may take as much time as writing the actual articles. If the ...


2

Our brains have evolved specifically to process movement in 3D space - being able to spot the sabre toothed tiger leaping at you would be the difference between being around to pass on your genes rather than becoming lunch. This book by Gibson is worth a read: The Ecological Approach To Visual Perception This is a book about how we see: the environment ...


2

The horizontal ellipsis was borrowed from typography where it is used to denote that there is more content that isn't shown in the current view. This is often used at the end of news story teaser text to show that there is more to read. It is also sometimes used in the context of a menu or toolbar to show that there are more options available. The vertical ...


2

It might be helpful to select a UI or feature that use anti-patterns (patterns/interactions that have unexpected results) along with UI/features using typically successful patterns. Have the users perform a task, such as to click on something, or to try to find something in a website/application, and then rate that task as soon as they're finished. For ...


2

I think I would consider cognitive friction as anything which gets in the way of a user completing their goal. In terms of the goal and application that's for you to decide, but beyond that, there are many different areas you could look at. For example, workflow / process could be a sensible start point. How many steps must the user complete to achieve ...


2

Cognitive friction happens when the application doesn't follow the correct mental model. In general, it's hard to fail in obvious/de facto solutions (e.g. back button sends you previous page/state all the time, hamburger button opens the main menu). For these problems, doing research is unnecessary but the ones that swim in grey waters can be applicable to ...


2

The semantic issue you're encountering is bullshit (as a technical term), or euphemism. Euphemism is the most gentle means to describe ”cognitive friction" as used to describe any mobile application user experiences. In any truthful discussion, it's going to be called what it is, it's bullshit. The presumptions that lead to the use of this term (and lay ...


1

It's a way to remind users what mode they're in. Kinda moot for the visually impaired user who relies on accessibility features and not color. A better option would be to allow the user to assign their own color to incognito (or private mode) mode, reflecting personalization and cultural preferences on color. Switching into this mode comes and announcing ...


1

I'd like some clarification There isn't any. There is no such thing as 'ideal' line lengths. There's a handful of small studies but they are all flawed in that they can't isolate line length very well as a single factor. What makes type legible, readable, and just plain comfortable depends on a whole range of criteria: the typeface design leading (line ...


1

Here is a completely different approach then mentioned so far. If we consider the idea that notes to the user submitting them are always the same thing, so it's a matter of where they are submitting to. Here is an example from popular agile program JIRA When writing a comment on the side of the submit button is a "target audience" drop down, set by the ...


1

Use fundamental design principles to create visual distinction between the elements. Using color, layout, typography, and scale, you can indicate to the user on a fundamental level that there are two different kinds of notes. Most of the other commenters have stressed one of these concepts (layout), but have not addressed the other design fundamentals in ...


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